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Sarah Alice Shelton

Name

[Shelton, Sarah Alice]
  • POST DOCTORAL RESEARCH ASSOCIA, English
  • Lecturer
  • https://sarahashelton.com/

Biography

This past August (2018), Sarah successfully defended her dissertation and earned her PhD from UTA. Before coming back to UTA as a fulltime student, Sarah taught high school English in the Mansfield ISD. She specialized in junior English—American Literature and AP Language and Composition. She is currently a Lecturer in the English department, teaching Literature, Composition, and  writing in Engineering. She received her B.A. in English from UT Austin and her Masters of Education in Teaching from UTA. Using posthumanism, composition studies, rhetorical theory, reading theory, critical theory, and post-qualitative teacher-research, her main research explores strategies for tuning into the posthuman possibility of the college English classroom. She also works extensively in fat studies, popular cutlure, YA literature, and fantasy and science fiction.

Professional Preparation

    • 2018 PhD in EnglishUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • 2008 M.Ed.T. in Secondary Education (Literacy Studies), 
    • 2003 Bachelor of Arts in English (Rhetoric & Composition),  University of Texas at Austin

Appointments

    • Aug 2017 to Present Lecturer
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2017 to May 2017 Grader (Engineering Problem Solving / Writng)
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2014 to Dec 2016 Enhanced Graduate Teaching Assistant
      University of Texas at Arlington   University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2014 to May 2016 Assistant Director of First Year Writing
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2013 to May 2014 Graduate Teaching Assistant
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2009 to June 2013 Secondary English Teacher (Junior/Sophomore English, AP Lang & Comp, Creative Writing)
      University of Texas at Arlington   Mansfield Independent School District (MISD)

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Aug 2015 to Present South Central Modern Language Association
    • Aug 2015 to Present The Modern Language Association
    • Aug 2013 to Present Popular/American Culture Association

Awards and Honors

    • May  2016 O’Neill Academic Excellence Award sponsored by UTA English Department
    • Nov  2015 Philip Cohen and Elaina McMillan Graduate Fellowship Award sponsored by Philip Cohen and Elaina McMillan
    • May  2013 Distinguished Educator Award sponsored by Mansfield Education Foundation

Publications

      Book Review 2017
      • Book Review: Dumplin’: Go Big or Go Home by Julie Murphy, Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society 6:2 (2017).

        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2016
      • “‘As Their Waistlines Recede’: Tracing and Challenging the Fat Quest in Young Adult Literature.” Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society 5:2 (2016). Edited by Natalie Boero.

        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • October  2017
      “Agential Composition: Intra-Active Pedagogy and Writing as an Onto-Epistemological Act”
      “Agential Composition: Intra-Active Pedagogy and Writing as an Onto-Epistemological Act.” SCMLA, October5, 2017.
    • October  2017
      “The Agential Classroom: Tuning to a Posthuman Pedagogy"
      “The Agential Classroom: Tuning to a Posthuman Pedagogy.” The Center for Theory, UTA, October 18, 2017.
    • January  2017
      “English Remix: Curating and Enacting a Posthuman Classroom”
      “English Remix: Curating and Enacting a Posthuman Classroom.” Teaching as Theoretical Practice Panel, MLA, January 6, 2017.
    • April  2016
      “These Aren’t the Robots You’re Hoping For: Imagining and Implementing the Posthuman English Classroom”
      “These Aren’t the Robots You’re Hoping For: Imagining and Implementing the Posthuman English Classroom.” UTA English Graduate Conference, April 8, 2016.
    • March  2016
      “Reengineering Writing: How Classroom Materiality Determines Rhetorical Reality”
      “Reengineering Writing: How Classroom Materiality Determines Rhetorical Reality.” CCTE, March 5, 2016.
    • November  2015
      “Enduring Silence: The Impossible Sound of Stolen and Sacred Names in Fantasy Fiction”
      “Enduring Silence: The Impossible Sound of Stolen and Sacred Names in Fantasy Fiction.” SCMLA, November 3, 2015.“Enduring Silence: The Impossible Sound of Stolen and Sacred Names in Fantasy Fiction.” SCMLA, November 3, 2015.
    • November  2015
      “Exodic Impulse and Edenic Nostalgia: The Fantasy of Immunitary Logic and the Reality of the Anthropocene in YA Dystopian Series”
      “Exodic Impulse and Edenic Nostalgia: The Fantasy of Immunitary Logic and the Reality of the Anthropocene in YA Dystopian Series.” SLSA, November 12-15, 2015.
    • April  2015
      “No Still Blues, Only Dust Lands: Environmental Fantasies versus Anthropocene Realities in YA Dystopian Series”
      “No Still Blues, Only Dust Lands: Environmental Fantasies versus Anthropocene Realities in YA Dystopian Series.” UTA English Graduate Conference, April 3, 2015.
    • April  2015
      "Erased and Replaced: The Absence of Fat Bodies on the Covers of Young Adult Novels”
      "Erased and Replaced: The Absence of Fat Bodies on the Covers of Young Adult Novels.” Cultural Constructions 2015:  Image/Text/Meaning, April 23, 2015.
    • August  2014
      “C is the New A: Grade Consistency and Transparency”
      “C is the New A: Grade Consistency and Transparency.” Presented and led grade norming workshop at the FYW Fall Faculty Orientation. August 19, 2014.
    • April  2014
      “In the Flesh: Theory Through Fiction in Miéville’s The Scar”
      “In the Flesh: Theory Through Fiction in Miéville’s The Scar.” UTA English Graduate Conference, April 5, 2014.
    • April  2014
      “Realizing Space and Reconstituting Silence: Rozema’s Mansfield Park as a Postcolonial Text"
      “Realizing Space and Reconstituting Silence: Rozema’s Mansfield Park as a Postcolonial Text.” Popular/American Culture Association National Conference, April 16-19, 2014.
    • February  2014
      “Three Covers, One Message: Fat Bias and the Repackaging of Young Adult Literature”
      “Three Covers, One Message: Fat Bias and the Repackaging of Young Adult Literature.” Southwest Popular/American Culture Association Conference, February 19-22, 2014.
    • April  2013

      'Between the Mirror and Society's Gaze: The Fat Teen Protagonist's Struggle to Break Free'

    • February  2013

      "From Fat Princess to Savior Queen: The Quest for Worth in Rae Carson"s The Girl of Fire and Thorns"

      Presenter and Session Chair

Live Performances

  • 2015
    • Nov 2015 "Shake the Bones"

      “Shake the Bones.” SCMLA, November 1, 2015.

      [Non-refereed/non-juried ]

Courses

      • ENGL 1302-075 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        English 1302: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing II is a course that builds on the skills learned in English 1301 by providing a more extensive introduction to rhetorical and argument theories. Students learn to identify a controversial issue independently, research that issue by navigating library databases, compile a bibliography of relevant sources, map the conversation surrounding the issue, and advocate their own position by developing claims supported by good reasons and evidence.  Students continue to practice recursive reading and writing processes and develop a more sophisticated awareness of context and audience. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-042 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        English 1302: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing II is a course that builds on the skills learned in English 1301 by providing a more extensive introduction to rhetorical and argument theories. Students learn to identify a controversial issue independently, research that issue by navigating library databases, compile a bibliography of relevant sources, map the conversation surrounding the issue, and advocate their own position by developing claims supported by good reasons and evidence.  Students continue to practice recursive reading and writing processes and develop a more sophisticated awareness of context and audience. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-039 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        English 1302: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing II is a course that builds on the skills learned in English 1301 by providing a more extensive introduction to rhetorical and argument theories. Students learn to identify a controversial issue independently, research that issue by navigating library databases, compile a bibliography of relevant sources, map the conversation surrounding the issue, and advocate their own position by developing claims supported by good reasons and evidence.  Students continue to practice recursive reading and writing processes and develop a more sophisticated awareness of context and audience. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENG 2329-002 American Literature

        In this section, we’ll focus on the idea of “the” American story. What is it? Who gets to tell it? Is there only one? Is it stable? Etc. In doing so, we’ll also work to define and challenge our notions of the words “American” and “story.” This is a low-lecture class that depends on student participation and student-driven research as we also question how we make meaning and what roles both reading and writing play in our learning and our general being. Not a survey course (which would aim to give you an understanding of the “American Literature” cannon and timeline), this section relies on a curation of “texts” tailored to the students’/class’ overall needs and interests as we work together to explore “American literature.”

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-075 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        English 1302: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing II is a course that builds on the skills learned in English 1301 by providing a more extensive introduction to rhetorical and argument theories. Students learn to identify a controversial issue independently, research that issue by navigating library databases, compile a bibliography of relevant sources, map the conversation surrounding the issue, and advocate their own position by developing claims supported by good reasons and evidence.  Students continue to practice recursive reading and writing processes and develop a more sophisticated awareness of context and audience. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-006 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        In this section, we’ll focus on the idea of “the” American story. What is it? Who gets to tell it? Is there only one? Is it stable? Etc. In doing so, we’ll also work to define and challenge our notions of the words “American” and “story.” This is a low-lecture class that depends on student participation and student-driven research as we also question how we make meaning and what roles both reading and writing play in our learning and our general being. Not a survey course (which would aim to give you an understanding of the “American Literature” cannon and timeline), this section relies on a curation of “texts” tailored to the students’/class’ overall needs and interests as we work together to explore “American literature.”

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-102 Engineering Problem Solving

        The Engineering Communication writing component of the larger Engineering Problem Solving Class: Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-011 Reuse.Remix.Rewrite.

        In Reuse.Remix.Rewrite. we’ll talk about how we get from Carroll’s to TeeLamb’s Alice or how we go from Wonderland to the Matrix. About why the theory of intertextuality (don’t worry–learning what this term means is part of the class) matters–not just in academia, but in our everyday lives. We’ll talk about adaptation and appropriation. We’ll debate copyright and fair use. I’ll argue that stories are alive and you’ll get to decide if I’m crazy or brilliant (although the idea wasn’t originally mine…which begs the question, “Are there any original ideas left?” We’ll wrangle with that one as well). We’ll deal with the “traditional” text-based work of an English class (see the preliminary reading and assignment lists below) but also interact and learn through technology as well via blogging, social media, video and sound, photography, drawing, and more.

        The class and its projects will encourage all modes of creativity and expression. Artists will have chances to produce art; engineers can decide to design/build projects. Reading and writing are central to the class, but they should mix with students’ strengths, lives, and passions, not “replace” them while you’re in this classroom for this hour or working on our assignments outside of class. We won’t always stay within the four walls the university assigns us–you should be willing to work outside, to move to different locations, to participate in an active classroom where we work and interact as a community.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-102 Engineering Problem Solving

        The Engineering Communication writing component of the larger Engineering Problem Solving Class: Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-007 ENGR 1300 Engineering Problem Solving: Engineering Communication

        The Engineering Communication writing component of the larger Engineering Problem Solving Class: Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-001 English 1302: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing II

        English 1302: Introduction to Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing II is a course that builds on the skills learned in English 1301 by providing a more extensive introduction to rhetorical and argument theories. Students learn to identify a controversial issue independently, research that issue by navigating library databases, compile a bibliography of relevant sources, map the conversation surrounding the issue, and advocate their own position by developing claims supported by good reasons and evidence.  Students continue to practice recursive reading and writing processes and develop a more sophisticated awareness of context and audience. 

        Summer - 11 Weeks - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENG 1301-001 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENG 1301-005 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-022 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-023 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours

Service to the University

  • Other
    • Feb 2018 to  Present Departmental Service

      Chair, Duncan Robinson Essay Contest Committee, 2016

      Associate Professor of Digital Humanities Search Committee, 2016

      Director of First Year Writing Search Committee, 2016

      Chair, Duncan Robinson Essay Contest Committee, 2015

      Summer Curriculum Committee, 2014

      Duncan Robinson Essay Contest Committee, 2014

    • Feb 2018 to  Present University Service

      Assistant Leader for Scoring Day for the Communication Core Objective with Institutional Effectiveness and Reporting. May 20, 2015.

      ACES Judge for Undergraduate Posters. March 25, 2015.

      Pilot Scoring Day with Institutional Effectiveness and Reporting. July 23, 2014.

  • Elected
    • Feb 2018 to  Present Enlgish Graduate Student Association

      Professional Development Chair, 2015-2016

      Abstract Committee, English Graduate Student Conference, 2015

      Treasurer, 2013-2014, 2014-2015

      Editorial Committee, {stet} literary magazine, 2013-2014

Administrative Appointment

  • 2014
    • Aug 2014 to May 2016 - Assistant Director of First Year Writing, University of Texas at Arlington