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Scott E. Ingram

Name

[Ingram, Scott E.]

Biography

Please click here to visit my website.    

Professional Preparation

    • 2010 Ph.D. in AnthropologyArizona State University
    • 1984 M.A. in Political ScienceOklahoma State University
    • 1978 B.A. with honors in Political ScienceOklahoma State University
    • 2004 M.A. in AnthropologyArizona State University

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Aug 2002 to Present Society for American Archaeology

Awards and Honors

Research and Expertise

  • Scott Ingram

    My research considers human and environmental interactions with an emphasis on using insights from archaeological research to address contemporary problems such as human responses to climate change. Research interests also include social transformations, sustainability, resilience, climate change, dendroclimatology, and ecological anthropology.

    Please see my website: www.scottingram.net

Publications

      Journal Article In-press
      • Ingram, Scott E. 

        2015 Human Sensitivity to Dry Periods in Central Arizona, 1200 to 1450 CE. Journal of Arizona Archaeology. 

        {Journal Article }
      In-press
      • Ingram, Scott E.  Climate, Human Behavior, and Historical Trajectories in the American Southwest.  In The Oxford Handbook of Southwestern Archaeology, edited by B. J. Mills and S. Fowles.  Oxford University Press.  

        {Journal Article }
      Under Review
      • M. Nelson, S. Ingram, A. Dugmore, R. Streeter, M. Peeples, T. McGovern, M. Hegmon, J. Arneborg, K. Kintigh, O. Vesteinsson, S. Brewington, K. Spielmann, I. Simpson, C. Strawhacker, L. Comeau, A. Torvinen, C. Madsen, G. Hambrecht

        (2015, in review) Climate Challenges, Vulnerability, and Food Security.  Submitted to the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences. 

        {Journal Article }
      Under Review
      • Ingram, Scott E. and Dennis Gilpin.  Southwestern Archaeology beyond Archaeology: Past, Present, and Future.  Invited article submitted to Kiva: The Journal of Southwestern Anthropology and History

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter Accepted
      • Ingram, Scott E. 

        2015 Climate, Human Behavior, and Historical Trajectories in the American Southwest. In The Oxford Handbook of Southwestern Archaeology.  Edited by B. J. Mills and S. Fowles.

        {Book Chapter }

      Conference Proceeding Published
      • Hegmon, M., J. Arneborg, A. Dugmore, G. Hambrecht, S. Ingram, K. Kintigh, T. McGovern, M. Nelson, M. Peeples, I. Simpson, K. Spielmann, R. Streeter, O. Vesteinsson. 
        2014  The Human Experience of Social Change and Continuity: The Southwest and North Atlantic in "Interesting Times" ca. 1300.  In Climates of Change: The Shifting Environments of Archaeology.  Proceedings of the 44th Annual Chacmool Conferences.  Edited by Sheila Lacey, Cara Tremain, and Madeleine Sawyer.  University of Calgary Press. 

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Conference Proceeding 2014
      • Hegmon, M., J. Arneborg, A. Dugmore, G. Hambrecht, S. Ingram, K. Kintigh, T. McGovern, M.  Nelson, M. Peeples, I. Simpson, K. Spielmann, R. Streeter, and O. Vésteinsson. The Human Experience of Social Change and Continuity: The Southwest and the North Atlantic in "Interesting Times" ca. 1300. In Climates of Change: The Shifting Environments of Archaeology. Proceedings of the 44th Annual Chacmool Conference, edited by S. Lacey, C. Tremain, and M. Sawyer. Pp 53-67. University of Calgary.

        {Conference Proceeding }
      2014
      • Hegmon, Michelle, Jette Arneborg, Laura Comeau, Andrew J. Dugmore, George Hambrecht, Scott Ingram, Keith Kintigh, Thomas H. McGovern, Margaret C. Nelson, Matthew A. Peeples, Ian Simpson, Katherine Spielmann, Richard Streeter, Orri Vésteinsson

        2014    The Human Experience of Social Change and Continuity: The Southwest and North Atlantic in “Interesting Times” ca. 1300.  In Climates of Change: The Shifting Environments of Archaeology, edited by Sheila Kulyk, Cara Tremain, and Madeleine Sawyer, pp. 53-68. Proceedings of the 44th Annual Chacmool Conference, University of Calgary.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2014
      • Hunt, Robert c. and Scott E. Ingram

        2014  Plant and Animal Production Calendar for the Middle Gila River: Pima and Hohokam. Kiva: The Journal of Southwestern Anthropology and History

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2014
      • Ingram, Scott E. 

        2014 Climatic, Demographic, and Environmental Influences on Central Arizona Settlement Patterns.  In Alliance and Landscape on Perry Mesa in the Fourteenth Century, edited by D. Abbott and K. Spielmann. University of Utah Press. Salt Lake City. 

        {Book Chapter }

      Book Chapter 2013
      • Nelson, Margaret C., Michelle Hegmon, Keith W. Kintigh, Ann P. Kinzig, Ben A. Nelson, John Marty Anderies, David A. Abbott, Katherine A. Spielmann, Scott E. Ingram, Matthew A. Peeples, Colleen A. Strawhacker, and Cathryn Meegan. "長期的脆弱性與恢復力: 美國西南部與墨西哥北部考古學研究 的實例" In 考古學與永續發展研究. Edited by 邱斯嘉 and 臧振華, pp. 93-117. 台北: 中央研究院人 文社會科學研究中心考古學研究專題中心. (Long-term Vulnerability and Resilience: Three Examples from Archaeological Study in the Southwestern US and Northern Mexico, Research Center for the Humanities and Social Science, Center for Archaeological Research: Taipei)

        {Book Chapter }

      Book Chapter 2012
      • Nelson, M.C., M. Hegmon, K.W. Kintigh, A.P. Kinzig, B.A. Nelson, J.M. Anderies, D.A. Abbott, K.A. Spielmann, S.E. Ingram, M.A. Peeples, S. Kulow, C.A. Strawhacker, C. Meegan.  Long-Term Vulnerability and Resilience: Three Examples from Archaeological Study in the Southwestern U.S. and Northern Mexico.  In Surviving Sudden Environmental Change: Answers from Archaeology, edited by Jago Cooper and Payson Sheets, pp. 197-221. University Press of Colorado, Boulder.  

        {Book Chapter }
      2012
      • M.C. Nelson, M. Hegmon, K.W. Kintigh, A.P. Kinzig, B.A. Nelson, J.M. Anderies, D.A. Abbott, K.A. Spielmann, S.E. Ingram, M.A. Peeples, S. Kulow, C.A. Strawhacker, C. Meegan.      

        2012  Long-term Vulnerability and Resilience: Three Examples from Archaeological Study in the Southwestern U.S. and Northern Mexico. In Surviving Sudden Environmental Change: Answers from Archaeology, edited by Jago Cooper and Payson Sheets, pp. 197-221. University Press of Colorado, Boulder.  

        {Book Chapter }

      Conference Proceeding 2012
      • Ingram, Scott E.  
        2012 Climatic and Demographic Influences on Perry Mesa Settlement. Proceedings of the Perry
        Mesa Symposium.  Friends of the Agua Fria National Monument. 

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2011
      • Spielmann, Katherine A., Margaret Nelson, Scott Ingram, and Matthew A. Peeples. Sustainable Small-Scale Agriculture in Semi-Arid Environments. Ecology and Society 16(1): 26.  

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2011
      • Katherine A. Spielmann, Margaret Nelson, Scott Ingram, and Matthew A. Peeples
        2011  Mitigating Environmental Risk in the U.S. Southwest. In Sustainable Lifeways: Cultural Persistence in an Ever-Changing Environment, edited by Naomi F. Miller, Katherine M. Moore and Kathleen Ryan. University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia.

        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 2010
      • Ingram, Scott E., and Douglas B. Craig.  
        2010  Streamflow and Population Dynamics Along the Middle Gila River.  Journal of Arizona Archaeology 1:33-45. 

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2009
      • Ingram, Scott E.  
        2009  Salinas Paleoclimate, A.D. 1100 to 1700.  In Salinas Contributions to the Study of Long-term Coupled Socioecological Change in the Southwest and Northern Mexico, by Katherine A. Spielmann, Scott Ingram, Stephanie Kulow, Matthew Peeples, and Cathryn Meegan.  Report submitted to the Western National Parks Association and Salinas Pueblo Missions National Monument, August 16, 2009.   

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2008
      • Ingram, Scott E. 
        2008  Streamflow and Population Change in the Lower Salt River Valley of Arizona, ca. A.D. 775 to 1450. American Antiquity 73:136-165.

        {Journal Article }

      Technical Report 2008
      • Jacobs, David, and Scott E. Ingram 
        2008  Vegetation Map of Phoenix, Arizona, 1867–1868. Central Arizona – Phoenix Long-Term Ecological  Research Contribution No. 3, Center for Environmental Studies, Arizona State University, Tempe.

        {Technical Report }

      Conference Proceeding 2008
      • Abbott, David R., Scott E. Ingram, and Katherine A. Spielmann 
        2008  Warfare and Farming: National Science Foundation Research on the Late Prehistoric Occupation of Perry Mesa. In Prescott to Perry Mesa: 4,000 Years of Adaptation, Innovation, and Change in Central Arizona, edited by Christine K. Robinson, Cory Breternitz, and Douglas R. Mitchell, pp. 20.1- 20.11. Sharlot Hall Museum Press, Prescott.

        {Conference Proceeding }
      2008
      • Abbott, David R., Scott E. Ingram, and Katherine A. Spielmann 
        2008  Warfare and Farming: National Science Foundation Research on the Late Prehistoric Occupation of Perry Mesa. In Prescott to Perry Mesa: 4,000 Years of Adaptation, Innovation, and Change in Central Arizona, edited by Christine K. Robinson, Cory Breternitz, and Douglas R. Mitchell, pp. 20.1- 20.11. Sharlot Hall Museum Press, Prescott.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2007
      • Biggs, R., C. Raudsepp-Hearne, C. Atkinson-Palombo, E. Bohensky, E. Boyd, G. Cundill, H. Fox, S. Ingram, K. Kok, S. Spehar, M. Tengö, D. Timmer, and M. Zurek
        2007  Linking Futures Across Scales: a Dialog on Multiscale Scenarios. Ecology and Society 12(1): 17. 

        {Journal Article }
      2007
      • Biggs, R., C. Raudsepp-Hearne, C. Atkinson-Palombo, E. Bohensky, E. Boyd, G. Cundill, H. Fox, S. Ingram, K. Kok, S. Spehar, M. Tengö, D. Timmer, and M. Zurek
        2007  Linking Futures Across Scales: a Dialog on Multiscale Scenarios. Ecology and Society 12(1): 17. 

        {Journal Article }

      Newsletter Article 2006
      • Minnis, Paul E. 
        2006  Answering the Skeptic’s Question SAA Archaeological Record 6 (5):17-20, contributions by Barbara J. Little, Robert Kelly, Scott E. Ingram, Dean Snow, Lynn Sebastian, and Katherine A. Spielmann. 

        {Newsletter Article }

      Journal Article 2006
      • Abbott, David R., Scott E. Ingram, and Brent G. Kober 
        2006  Hohokam Exchange and Early Classic Period Organization in Central Arizona: Focal Villages or Linear Communities?  Journal of Field Archaeology 31:285-305.  

        {Journal Article }
      2006
      • Abbott, David R., Scott E. Ingram, and Brent G. Kober 
        2006  Hohokam Exchange and Early Classic Period Organization in Central Arizona: Focal Villages or Linear Communities?  Journal of Field Archaeology 31:285-305.  

        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • April  2015
      Farmers’ Responses to Climate Variation in the US Southwest

      Paper presented at the 80th Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, San Francisco, California. 

    • April  2014
      Archaeological Methods for Vulnerability Assessment

      Paper presented at the Society for American Archaeology Annual Meeting. 

    • April  2013
      Taking Insights not Lessons from the Past

      TEDx Talk at the University of Texas at Arlington, 22 April 2013.

    • April  2013
      Completed Long Term Experiments? Mobilizing Archaeology in the Anthropocene

      Paper presented at the XIII Nordic TAG meeting, Reykjavik, Iceland.  Presented by Thomas H. McGovern.

    • February  2012
      Climatic Hazards and Human Responses in the North Atlantic and U.S. Southwest

      Paper presented at the AAAS Annual Meeting in the symposium titled "Climate Change and the Long-Term     Sustainability of Human Societies,"  Presented by Andrew Dugmore. 

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Aug 2009 to May 2010 Graduate College Dissertation Writing Fellowship sponsored by  - $12000
    • Aug 2003 to May 2010 Fellow, National Science Foundation, Integrated Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT) sponsored by  - $72000
    • May 2006 to June 2006 Agnese N. Haury Visiting Scholar and Trainee Fellowship sponsored by  - $1

Courses

      • ANTH 3357-001 Collapse and Sustainability of Past Societies

        This course investigates social and environmental collapse and sustainability in the past and future. We will examine if and how we can employ human (pre)history in our efforts to understand and achieve sustainability. Modern sustainability studies often rely on data representing recent time periods of short duration. Using archaeological case studies from around the world (e.g., Anasazi, Rapa Nui, Greenland) we consider periods of social and environmental stability and change and ask, “What can be learned; can the past inform the future?”
        Learning activities emphasize methods of creating new knowledge, how to make a scientific argument, and interdisciplinary collaboration among students. No prerequisites.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 1310-001 Great Discoveries in Archaeology

        King Tutankhamun's tomb in Egypt and Machu Picchu in Peru continue to thrill the world a century after their discovery. Magnificent ancient ruins always in plain sight (Stonehenge, Giza, Mesa Verde, Persepolis, Cahokia, the Athenian Acropolis) also have their stories to tell. Such sites will serve as an entree into an understanding of the deep and recent past of our species in this history of archaeology from the Stone Age to the past millennium. This unique course will be taught by two archaeologists: one specializing in the Old World and the other the New World. Join the argument to consider how you know what you know. No prerequisites.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 1306-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

        Anthropology is the study of humanity, past and present, and around the world. In this overview of the discipline you will learn about archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics. Anthropology imparts invaluable core knowledge about human cultural and biological history, lending itself flexibly as a tool to refine your interests and expand the curiosity you bring to higher education. The goal of this course is to build anthropological knowledge you can use for the rest of your life. This course fulfills the core curriculum requirement in social and behavioral sciences.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4191-002 Conference Course: Career Workshop for Anthropology Majors

        This workshop is designed to prepare Anthropology majors for the job market or graduate school.  During the course you will develop a resume and a professional website, prepare for a job interview, practice professional communication skills, identify resources for finding jobs, and evaluate graduate schools and prepare a personal statement (if needed).  Opportunities in all sub-disciplines will be discussed during guest presentations by members of the Anthropology faculty.  

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 3350-001 NORTH AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY

        Exciting new research shows that much of what we think about the Americas before Columbus is wrong. Learn what we now know about the first peoples of North America and some of those in South America.This is not a world prehistory course where learning dates and specific events are the emphasis. Instead, our anthropological approach will lead us to consider questions about why and how human history and social change proceeded the way it did. The course will strengthen your understanding of how we know about the past in the absence of written records. No prerequisites.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2339-001 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY

        How do we know what happened in the past when we don’t have any written or oral records of what occurred? The answer is archaeology--the scientific study of the past through the material remains of past human activity. In this course you will learn about the changing social, cultural, and environmental dimensions of the human past and the methods and theories archaeologists use to uncover this past. No prerequisites.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 1306-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

        Anthropology is the study of humanity, past and present, and around the world. In this overview of the discipline you will learn about archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics. Anthropology imparts invaluable core knowledge about human cultural and biological history, lending itself flexibly as a tool to refine your interests and expand the curiosity you bring to higher education. The goal of this course is to build anthropological knowledge you can use for the rest of your life.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 4358-001 Collapse and Sustainability

        This course investigates the collapse of past societies.  Understanding why and how archaeologically-known societies collapsed may provide insights to help us understand contemporary social and environmental sustainability problems, such as climate change.  Archaeology offers an opportunity to study long-term and completed experiments in social organization and human-environmental interactions.  Class topics range from resilience and complex adaptive systems approaches to traditional archaeological case studies of collapse. No course prerequisites.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2339-001 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHAEOLOGY

        How do we know what happened in the past when we don't have any written or oral records of what occurred?  The answer is archaeology---the scientific study of the past through the material remains of past human activity.  In this course you will learn about the changing social, cultural, and environmental dimensions of the human past and the methods and theories archaeologists use to uncover this past.  You will consider a variety of fascinating questions, such as:  How were societies organized, what did people eat, why did things change?  This course is also designed to help you develop your critical thinking skills and understanding of the scientific method through the study of archaeology.  These are essential skills you can use in any academic discipline, career, and in life.
         

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 1306-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

        Anthropology is the study of humanity and the only discipline that can access evidence about the entire human experience on this planet. In this overview of the discipline you will learn about archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics.  Anthropology imparts invaluable core knowledge about human cultural and biological history, lending itself flexibly as a tool to refine your interests and expand the curiosity you bring to higher education.  See http://www.ingramanthropology.com for more information about this course. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 3351-001 Archaeology of the American Southwest

        The secluded cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde and the stunning architecture of Chaco Canyon beg the questions: “Who built and lived in these places? What were their lives like? Why did they vanish—or did they?” This course investigates the peoples and places of the American Southwest—one of the most archaeologically studied places on earth.  The focus of our investigations is the period of dramatically increasing settlement, diversity, movement, and change from 500 to 1500 C.E.  In addition to close attention to the archaeological record, we will rely on ethnographies and comparative research to enrich our understanding of the past and present peoples of the Southwest. The region includes Arizona, New Mexico, southern Colorado, southern Utah, and much of Sonora and Chihuahua in northwest Mexico.  See http://www.ingramanthropology.com for more information about this course. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2339-001 Principles of Archaeology

        How do we know what happened in the past when we don't have any written or oral records of what occurred?  The answer is archaeology---the scientific study of the past through the material remains of past human activity.  In this course you will learn and practice some of the methods and theories archaeologists use to reconstruct the past.  You will consider a variety of fascinating questions about the past, such as:  How were societies organized, what was the environment, what did people eat, why did things change?  This course is also designed to help you develop your critical thinking skills and understanding of the scientific method through the study of archaeology.  These are essential skills you can use in any academic discipline, career, and in life. See http://www.ingramanthropology.com for more information about this course. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 1306-001 Introduction to Anthropology

        Anthropology is the study of humanity and the only discipline that can access evidence about the entire human experience on this planet. In this overview of the discipline you will learn about archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics.  Anthropology imparts invaluable core knowledge about human cultural and biological history, lending itself flexibly as a tool to refine your interests and expand the curiosity you bring to higher education.  See http://www.ingramanthropology.com for more information about this course. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 3350-001 North American Archaeology

        Exciting new research shows that much of what we think about the Americas before Columbus is wrong.  Learn what we now know about the prehistoric cultures of North America (from the Moundbuilders of the Eastern Woodlands to the Thule culture of the Arctic) and some of those in South America (Aztecs, Incas). The course is a blend of anthropological and archaeological approaches to understanding the past and human behavior.  It is not a world prehistory course where learning dates and specific events are the emphasis.  Instead, our anthropological approach will lead us to consider questions about why/how prehistory and human social evolution proceeded the way it did.  We will also focus on how cultures adapt to their environments.  We will always question how we know what we know about the past.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • ANTH 2339-001 Principles of Archaeology

        How do we know what happened in the past when we don't have any written or oral records of what occurred?  The answer is archaeology---the scientific study of the past through the material remains of past human activity.  In this course you will learn and practice some of the methods and theories archaeologists use to reconstruct the past.  You will consider a variety of fascinating questions about the past, such as:  How were societies organized, what was the environment, what did people eat, why did things change?  This course is also designed to help you develop your critical thinking skills and understanding of the scientific method through the study of archaeology. These are essential skills you can use in any academic discipline, career, and in life.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ANTH 2339-002 Principles of Archaeology

        How do we know what happened in the past when we don't have any written or oral records of what occurred?  The answer is archaeology---the scientific study of the past through the material remains of past human activity.  In this course you will learn and practice some of the methods and theories archaeologists use to reconstruct the past.  You will consider a variety of fascinating questions about the past, such as:  How were societies organized, what was the environment, what did people eat, why did things change?  This course is also designed to help you develop your critical thinking skills and understanding of the scientific method through the study of archaeology. These are essential skills you can use in any academic discipline, career, and in life.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • ANTH 4358-001 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY, Sustainability and Collapse

        We have all been challenged by the message that we must achieve "sustainability" or society may "collapse."  What must be sustained, for whom, and for how long?  What does it mean for a society to collapse?  Have past societies collapsed or transformed? 

        In this course we investigate the concept of social and environmental sustainability and collapse by considering potential examples of both in prehistory (e.g., Rapa Nui, Norse Greenland, Puebloan U.S. Southwest).  Our examination ranges across a diverse intellectual landscape: from the interdisciplinary concepts of resilience and complex adaptive systems to traditional archaeological considerations of the influence of climate change and warfare on human populations.  

        The impacts of a changing climate on human events (past and future) will receive specific attention in this course.  There is also a strong emphasis on research methods, creating new knowledge, and interdisciplinary collaboration among students.  

        The central question you will consider throughout the course is:  "Can an understanding of the past inform the future?"  The course neither begins nor ends with an answer; you must come to your own thoughtful (evidence-based) conclusion.  A primary learning activity in this course is the development of a public website focused on evaluating the past for insights into present concerns.  Websites will be developed by interdisciplinary teams of students(see a few from the Spring 2013 class).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • ANTH 3355-001 THE RISE OF CIVILIZATION

        This course considers the transformation of early hunters and gatherers to "modern" humans living in the first cities.  We will investigate the origins of agriculture and the factors that influenced the rise, development, and collapse of early cities and civilizations around the world. Understanding how we know what we know about the past will be a continual theme in the course. We will also use the comparative method and eHRAF to gain insights from analyzing data. The course is a blend of anthropological and archaeological approaches to understanding the past and human behavior. It is not a world (pre)history course; rather, we will consider questions about why/how prehistory and human social evolution proceeded the way it did. Students are active participants in the process of knowledge creation in this course. 

        This course is open to students in any major; no prerequisites are required. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • ANTH 2302-001 Principles of Archaeology

        How do we know what happened in the past when we don't have any written or oral records of what occurred?  The answer is archaeology---the scientific study of the past through the material remains of past human activity.  In this course you will learn and practice some of the methods and theories archaeologists use to reconstruct the past.  You will consider a variety of fascinating questions about the past, such as:  How were societies organized, what was the environment, what did people eat, why did things change?  This course is also designed to help you develop your critical thinking skills and understanding of the scientific method through the study of archaeology.  These are essential skills you can use in any academic discipline, career, and in life.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • ANTH 4358-001 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY
        We have all been challenged by the message that we must achieve "sustainability" or society may "collapse." This message stimulates consideration and evaluation. What must be sustained, for whom, and for how long? What does it mean for a society to collapse? In this course we investigate the concept of social and environmental sustainability and collapse by considering examples of both in prehistory (e.g., Greenland, Iceland, Maya, Anasazi). Our examination ranges across a diverse intellectual landscape: from the interdisciplinary concepts of resilience and complex adaptive systems to traditional archaeological considerations of the influence of climate change and warfare on human populations. The central question you will consider throughout the course is: "Can an understanding of the past inform the future?" The course neither begins nor ends with an answer; you must come to your own thoughtful conclusion.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus 1 Link
      • ANTH 2339-001 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHAEOLOGY
        How do we know what happened in the past when we don't have any written or oral records of what occurred? The answer is archaeology---the scientific study of the past through the material remains of past human activity. In this course you will learn and practice some of the methods and theories archaeologists use to reconstruct the past. You will consider a variety of fascinating questions about the past, such as: How were societies organized, what was the environment, what did people eat, why did things change? This course is also designed to help you develop your critical thinking skills and understanding of the scientific method through the study of archaeology. These are essential skills you can use in any academic discipline, career, and in life.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus 1 Link
      • ANTH 2339-002 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHAEOLOGY
        How do we know what happened in the past when we don't have any written or oral records of what occurred? The answer is archaeology---the scientific study of the past through the material remains of past human activity. In this course you will learn and practice some of the methods and theories archaeologists use to reconstruct the past. You will consider a variety of fascinating questions about the past, such as: How were societies organized, what was the environment, what did people eat, why did things change? This course is also designed to help you develop your critical thinking skills and understanding of the scientific method through the study of archaeology. These are essential skills you can use in any academic discipline, career, and in life.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus 1 Link
      • ANTH 4358-001 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY, Prehistory of the North American Southwest

        The secluded cliff dwellings of Mesa Verde and the stunning architecture of Chaco Canyon beg the questions: "Who built and lived in these places? What were their lives like? Why did they vanish”or did they? In this course you will investigate the peoples and places of the prehistoric Southwest, one of the most archaeologically studied places on earth. Our examination includes the initial settlement of the region about 12,000 years ago and concludes with the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 C.E. This course is also designed to help you develop your critical thinking, scientific-style writing, and oral presentation skills through the study of archaeology. These are essential skills you can use in any academic discipline, career, and in life.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • ANTH 5349-001 Topics in Archaeology

        In this course we investigate the concept of social and environmental sustainability. We examine if and how we can employ thousands of years of human (pre)history in our efforts to understand and achieve sustainability. Modern sustainability studies often rely on data representing recent time periods of short duration. Using archaeological case studies from around the world we consider periods of social and environmental stability and change in our exploration of sustainability and ask, "What can be learned; can the past inform the future?

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Link
      • ANTH 2339-001 PRINCIPLES OF ARCHAEOLOGY
        How do we know what happened in the past when we don't have any written or oral records of what occurred? The answer is archaeology---the scientific study of the past through the material remains of past human activity. In this course you will learn and practice some of the methods and theories archaeologists use to reconstruct the past. You will consider a variety of fascinating questions about the past, such as: How were societies organized, what was the environment, what did people eat, why did things change? This course is also designed to help you develop your critical thinking skills and understanding of the scientific method through the study of archaeology. These are essential skills you can use in any academic discipline, career, and in life.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus 1 Link
      • ANTH 4358-002 TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY
        In this course we investigate the concept of social and environmental sustainability. We will examine if and how we can employ human (pre)history in our efforts to understand and achieve sustainability. Modern sustainability studies often rely on data representing recent time periods of short duration. Using archaeological case studies from around the world we consider periods of social and environmental stability and change and ask, “What can be learned; can the past inform the future?â€
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus 1 Link