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Sean Farrell

Name

[Farrell, Sean]
  • Lecturer, English

Biography

Sean Farrell earned his M.A. in English from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2014, after which he spent a year teaching English in Japan. He is currently working on an M.A. in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at UT Arlington while working full-time in the Department of English, where he teaches Developmental English, Freshman Composition, Technical Writing, and Structure of Modern English. His areas of research interest include New Materialism, Posthumanism, Second Language Acquisition, Language Assessment, and Curriculum Design.

Professional Preparation

    • 2012 B.A., Honors in EnglishUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • 2014 M.A. in EnglishUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • In Progress M.A. TESOL University of Texas at Arlington  Department of Linguistics and TESOL

Appointments

    • Aug 2012 to Present Graduate Teaching Assistant
      University of Texas at Arlington, Department of English

Awards and Honors

    • May  2014 O'Neill GTA Award for Academic Excellence sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington Department of English

Research and Expertise

  • New materialism, second language acquisition, queer theory, feminist political and literary theory, science studies, TESOL

    My M.A. thesis involved an investigation into the ethical and political dimensions of "bioart," a complex kind of artwork that utilizes living organisms as part of its artistic materials.  The primary lens through which I view bioart is new materialist theory, particularly that of Alaimo, Barad, and Haraway, which takes objects, things, and matter seriously outside of purely discursive (structuralist and poststructuralist) paradigms of interpretation and representation.  I have used these theories to investigate such issues as the limits of life, the material dimensions of history in Japanese anime and manga, and the relationship between discursive representations of self and materially lived existences in queer life writing.

    More recently, I have become interested in Second Language Acquisition, Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages, and developmental English. I am especially interested in English language education in Japan, and the particular institutional, educational, and linguistic challenges faced by Japanese students on English.

Presentations

  • Past
    •  
      "Animating Art: Toward a New Materialist Understanding of Bioart and Agency." Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment, Spring 2013.
  • Past
    •  
      "Metonymic Reflection and Agential Diffraction: Observing Genetic Bioart." North Texas Graduate English Conference, Spring 2013.
  • Past
    •  
      "'It's in the Genes, Right?': Material Memory and Regressive Apocalypse in Katsuhiro Otomo's Akira." Far West Popular and American Culture Associations Conference, Spring 2013.
  • Past
    •  
      "Hir-Story: Sites of Transsexual Identity and Community Construction in Jennifer Finney Boylan's She's Not There and Jamison Green's Becoming a Visible Man." HURCA Conference, Spring 2012.
  • Past
    •  
      "Capitalist Transformations in the Wake of Apocalypse: Akira and The Last of the O-Forms." The Annual Celebration of Excellence by Students, Spring 2012.

Courses

      • ENGL 1302-009 Rhetoric and Composition II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-014 Rhetoric and Composition II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-023 Rhetoric and Composition II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-066 Rhetoric and Composition II

        ENGL 1302 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-003 Structure of Modern English

        This course is an introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for teaching effective writing. In this course, we will examine English grammar not to teach you “proper” English, but to discover how English is used and what is unique about this particular language. We will then apply this knowledge to the teaching of English, either in ESL or first language contexts, with the understanding that a side benefit of such knowledge is that it can improve your writing.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-003 Structure of Modern English

        This course is an introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for teaching effective writing. In this course, we will examine English grammar not to teach you “proper” English, but to discover how English is used and what is unique about this particular language. We will then apply this knowledge to the teaching of English, either in ESL or first language contexts, with the understanding that a side benefit of such knowledge is that it can improve your writing.

        In other words, in this class we will focus on three main questions: First, what are the grammatical features of English in use, especially at the level of the phrase and clause? Second, how are these features often presented to native and nonnative students of English? And third, how can we use our answers to the first two questions to design effective lesson plans?

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 300-003 Introduction to Critical Reading and Writing

        English 0300 is a reading and writing course designed to enhance critical reading skills and academic essay writing.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 301-009 Integrated Reading and Writing Fundamentals

        Pairs with ENGL1301-CO9. Introduction, review, and workshop of key skills introduce in 1301.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-009 TECHNICAL WRITING

        This course introduces students to the fundamentals of technical writing. Students are introduced to the types of documents frequently created in professional settings including project proposals, informational reports, formal letters, and emails. Students identify and perform critical steps required of professional communication including audience analysis, research, drafting, and revising. By working independently as well as collaboratively, students develop the skills required of communicators in today’s fast-paced, information driven, and collaborative workplace.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-004 STRUCTURE OF MODERN ENGLISH

        This course is an introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for teaching effective writing. In this course, we will examine English grammar not to teach you “proper” English, but to discover how English is used and what is unique about this particular language. We will then apply this knowledge to the teaching of English, either in ESL or first language contexts, with the understanding that a side benefit of such knowledge is that it can improve your writing.

        In other words, in this class we will focus on three main questions: First, what are the grammatical features of English in use, especially at the level of the phrase and clause? Second, how are these features often presented to native and nonnative students of English? And third, how can we use our answers to the first two questions to design effective lesson plans?

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-001 Integrated Reading and Writing Workshop

        By the end of ENGL 0100,  students should be able to Develop long-term reading and writing strategies  for college level courses; Summarize, analyze, and respond to texts; Produce texts with a focus, thesis, and controlling idea, and identify these elements in others’ texts; and Demonstrate knowledge of and ability to use the writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revising, and editing— to write persuasively in multiple genres.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-004 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course is an introduction to college reading and writing. It emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-103 Engineering Problem Solving (Lab)

        The Engineering Communication writing component of the larger Engineering Problem Solving Class, which is a broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines. In the writing portion, students will practice producing texts that are succinct, thorough, and correct, qualities that are vital to writing in the profession.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-002 Structure of Modern English

        This course is an introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for teaching effective writing. In this course, we will examine English grammar not to teach you “proper” English, but to discover how English is used and what is unique about this particular language. We will then apply this knowledge to the teaching of English, either in ESL or K-12 contexts, with the understanding that a side benefit of such knowledge is that it can improve your writing.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2338-013 Technical Writing

        This course introduces students to the fundamentals of technical writing. Students are introduced to the types of documents frequently created in professional settings including project proposals, informational reports, formal letters, and emails. Students identify and perform critical steps required for professional communication, including audience analysis, research, drafting, and revising. By working independently as well as collaboratively, students develop the skills required of communicators in today’s fast-paced, information-driven, and collaborative workplace. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-040 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college-level essays.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2384-003 Structure of Modern English

        This course is an introduction to the grammatical structure of modern English at the level of the word, clause, and discourse, with applications for teaching effective writing. In this course, we will examine English grammar not to teach you “proper” English, but to discover how English is used and what is unique about this particular language. We will then apply this knowledge to the teaching of English, either in ESL or first language contexts, with the understanding that a side benefit of such knowledge is that it can also be used to improve your writing.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-049 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-072 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-081 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-097 Rhetoric and Composition I

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-007 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        This course is an introduction to college reading and writing. It emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Summer - 11 Weeks - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-003 INTEGRATED READING AND WRITING WORKSHOP

        Integration of critical reading and academic writing skills. Fulfills TSI requirements for reading and/or writing.

        Summer - 11 Weeks - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-006 INTEGRATED READING AND WRITING WORKSHOP

        Integration of critical reading and academic writing skills. Fulfills TSI requirements for reading and/or writing.

        Summer - 11 Weeks - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-001 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.  

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-011 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-020 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-025 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-008 Writing for Engineers

        The Engineering Communication writing component of the larger Engineering Problem Solving Class: Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

      • ENGR 1300-009 Writing for Engineers

        The Engineering Communication writing component of the larger Engineering Problem Solving Class: Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-004 Integrated Reading and Wriitng

        Integration of critical reading and academic writing skills. Fulfills TSI requirements for reading and/or writing.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 100-005 Integrated Reading and Writing

        Integration of critical reading and academic writing skills. Fulfills TSI requirements for reading and/or writing.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-015 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-022 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-045 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-049 Rhetoric and Composition I

        This course satisfies the University of Texas at Arlington core curriculum requirement in communication. This course will require students to read rhetorically and analyze scholarly texts on a variety of subjects. The course emphasizes writing to specific audiences and understanding how information is context dependent and audience specific. Students must engage with a variety of ideas and learn how to synthesize those in college level essays.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-037 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-069 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-016 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.  The information provided is tenative in regards to scheduling and time.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-011 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.  The information provided is tenative in regards to scheduling and time.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-014 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I
        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • May 2013 to  May 2013 2013 Panel Judge for Duncan Robinson Essay Competition.

      Served on panel which determined the winners of the 2013 Duncan Robinson Essay Competition.

  • Elected
    • Aug 2013 to  June 2014 President of the English Graduate Student Association

      Was elected to serve as Co-President to the EGSA for the Fall 2013-Spring 2014 academic year.

Other Service Activities

  • Curriculum committee
    • Jun 2014 First Year Writing Curriculum Committee