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Dr. Stacy Alaimo PhD

Name

[Alaimo PhD, Dr. Stacy]
  • Professor of English
  • Distinguished Teaching Professor

Biography

See Stacy Alaimos personal web page  here: https://www.stacyalaimo.com

Professor Alaimo is an internationally recognized scholar of American literature, ecocultural theory, environmental humanities, science studies, and gender theory. Her work is widely cited, across many disciplines, has been reprinted and has been translated into Swedish, Greek, Polish, and Portugese. She received her PhD in English, along with a certificate in critical theory, from the University of Illinois in 1994. She has published three monographs: Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space (Cornell University Press, 2000); Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self (Indiana University Press, 2010); and  Exposed: Environmental Politics and Pleasures in Posthuman Times (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2016). Bodily Natures won the ASLE Award for Ecocriticism in 2011 and was featured in a special book session at the International Association of Environmental Philosophy (IAEP) in 2013.  Undomesticated Ground was widely reviewed and is widely cited--across the humanities, social sciences, and environmental humanities. Alaimo co-edited the stellar theory collection, Material Feminisms, with UTA Professor Susan J. Hekman (Indiana UP. 2008).  Another book, an edited volume entitled Matter is also forthcoming in 2017, with MacMillan Press. She has also published many essays and book chapters, some of which have been translated and otherwise reprinted, on such subjects as environmental literature and film, environmental art and architecture, performance art, environmental pedagogy, gender and climate change, nonhuman sexual diversity, new materialism, and the science, art, and literature of the oceans. She is well known in American literature, environmental studies, science studies, and gender studies.  Her work has influenced the development of the fields of “material ecocriticism,” “material feminisms,” and the cross-disciplinary field of new materialist theory more broadly.  Alaimo is internationally recognized for developing new materialist theory, specifically the concept of "trans-corporeality," which many scholars now use. The concept is included as a key term in Rosi Braidottis The Posthuman Glossary (2017). Alaimos work forges connections across the divided realms of science, philosophy, literature, and popular culture. She has given many invited and plenary talks, nationally and internationally. In Fall 2011 she served as an Honorary Guest Researcher at TEMA, an interdisciplinary studies program, in Linkoping Sweden, and taught a doctoral seminar for European graduate students, within the InterGender program. She is currently writing a book entitled, Blue Ecologies: Science, Aesthetics, and the Creatures of the Abyss, about the representation of sea creatures in science, art, literature, and popular culture. She was awarded a Friends of the Princeton University Library, Library Research Grant, 2011-2012 to work on the William Beebe Archives. She was honored to have been invited to serve on the prestigious international evaluation panel of the MISTRA/FORMAS Environmental Humanities Initiative, Stockholm, Sweden, February 7-15 2013. She was also asked to serve as a member of the inaugural committee of the MLA Forum on Ecocriticism and the Environmental Humanities 2014-2015. She received the College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Research Achievement Award in 2013 and  has received several teaching awards from UTA and the UT System. She was very honored to be the Wang Distinguished Visiting Professor at GWU in Fall of 2016 and to be featured in ASUs Sustainability Thought Leader Series: https://sustainability.asu.edu/news/thought-leader/.  She has been pleased to collaborate with the artist Marina Zurkow and with the Irish swim artist Vanessa Daws. In 2016 she and Nicole Starosielski began editing a book series, "Elements," for Duke University Press. She has directed the work of many PhD and MA students. More on her research is here: http://www.uta.edu/english/alaimo/research.html, here https://uta.academia.edu/StacyAlaimo/CurriculumVitae, and here: https://www.stacyalaimo.com

Professional Preparation

    • 1994 Ph.D. in EnglishThe University of Illinois
    • 1994 Certificate in Critical Theory in Unit for Criticism and Interpretive TheoryThe University of Illinois
    • 1986 M.A. in EnglishUniversity of Wisconsin
    • 1985 BA in English (Psychology),  Gustavus Adolphus College

Appointments

    • Dec 2015 to Present Research Partnership: Consortium of the Environmental Humanities Collaboratory, The Seed Box: A Mistra-Formas Environmental Humanities Collaboratory, (international consortium, based in Sweden) 2016--
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts   English Dept.
    • June 2015 to Aug 2016 Director of the Environmental and Sustainability Studies Minor (CAPPA)
      CAPPA
    • Aug 2010 to Present Professor of English
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2010 to Present Distinguished Teaching Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts   English
    • Aug 2011 to July 2015 Coordinator
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2009 to Jan 2011 Academic Co-Chair of President's Sustainability Committee
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2000 to Jan 2010 Associate Professor of English
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2001 to Jan 2004 Associate Chair for Graduate Studies
      University of Texas at Arlington   College Liberal Arts   English
    • Aug 1994 to Jan 1999 Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington   College Liberal Arts   English
    • Aug 1988 to May 1994 Teaching Assistant
      The University of Illinois   College of Liberal Arts and Sciences   English, Women's Studies

Memberships

  • Professional
    • June 2013 to Present TEMA: Department of Thematic Studies, Genus/Gender. Posthumanities Hub. Linkoping University, SWEDEN, 2011
    • June 2013 to Present AESS: Association for Environmental Studies and Sciences
    • June 2013 to Present ASLE: Association for the Study of Literature and Environment
    • June 2013 to Present SLSA: Society for the Study of Literature, Science, and the Arts
    • June 2013 to Present ASA: American Studies Association
    • June 2013 to Present MLA: Modern Language Association
    • June 2013 to Present SSAWW: Society for the Study of American Women Writers
    • June 2013 to Present AAUP: American Association of University Professors
    • June 2013 to Present AASHE: Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (UTA program membership)
  • Membership
    • June 2013 to Present Minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ESS)
    • June 2013 to Present Women's and Gender Studies Program
    • 1995 to Present University of Texas at Arlington  Center for Theory
    • June 2013 to Sept 2015 University Sustainability Committee: Curriculum, Research, and Community Engagement Workgroup

Awards and Honors

    • Oct  2016 Wang Distinguished Professor-in-Residence, George Washington University, October 2016. sponsored by English Dept.College of Liberal ArtsOffice of the Provost and Vice President for Academic AffairsOffice of the PresidentUniversity of Texas at Arlington
      Achievements:

      Dr. Alaimo has three single-authored books, two edited collections, and 43 scholarly essays published and forthcoming. Her work has been reprinted and translated into Swedish and Portuguese and is widely cited across many disciplines and countries. Her book Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self, won the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment book award in 2011, was featured in a podcast interview on the New Book Network, was the subject of a special session at the International Association of Environmental Philosophy conference, and its key concept of “trans-corporeality” will be included as a keyword in the book, The Posthuman Glossary. She has been a leading theorist of new materialism, ecomaterialism, posthumanism, and material feminisms and is currently developing new theories and analyses of marine animal studies and the blue humanities.

    • Mar  2016 Excellence in Doctoral Student Mentoring Award, 2016 sponsored by UT-Arlington, Office of Graduate Studies
    • Jan  2015 Member of the inaugural committee of the MLA Forum, Ecocriticism and the Environmental Humanities 2014-2015. sponsored by Modern Language Association
    • Oct  2013 Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and The Material Self, featured in a special book session at the International Association of Environmental Philosophy (IAEP), Eugene, Oct. 27, 2013. sponsored by IAEP, International Association for Environmental Philosophy
    • Jun  2013 Outstanding Research Achievement Award sponsored by College Liberal ArtsUniversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Feb  2013 International Evaluation panel of the major MISTRA Environmental Humanities Initiative, Stockholm, Sweden, February 7-15 2013. MISTRA, The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research; FORMAS, The Swedish Research Council, for Sustainable Development. sponsored by FORMA, MISTRA, Sweden
    • Jun  2012 Piper Professor Nominee for 2012 sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Nov  2011 Invited to teach a European doctoral seminar for Inter-Gender, the Swedish-International Research School in Interdisciplinary Gender Studies, November-December 2011. sponsored by TEMA, Linkoping, SWEDEN
    • Jun  2011 ASLE Book Award for Ecocriticism for Bodily Natures (2011) sponsored by ASLE: Association for the Study of Literature and Environment
    • Jun  2011 Library Research Grant sponsored by Princeton University Library
    • Jun  2011 Outstanding Teaching Award, 2011 sponsored by The University of Texas System Regents Award Details
    • Jun  2010 Distinguished Teaching Professor sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan  2010 Elected to serve on the MLA Division on Literature and Science, 2010-2015. sponsored by MLA
    • Sep  2009 Invited Scholar, Quadrant Project. University of Minnesota Press, University of Minnesota Institute for Advanced Study, Fall, 2009. sponsored by University of Minnesota Press, University of Minnesota Institute for Advanced Study
    • Jun  2009 Alicia Wilkerman Smotherman Faculty Award, 2009 sponsored by Alicia Wilkerman Smotherman
    • Jun  2009 Freshman Leaders on Campus Faculty Appreciation Recognition, 2009 sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jun  2009 “Recognized Professor,” sponsored by The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi
    • Jun  2008 Inaugural Recipient of the Chancellor’s Council Award sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jun  1991 Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award, 1991-1992. sponsored by English DepartmentThe University of Illinois
    • Jun  1988 List of Excellent Teachers, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1994. sponsored by The University of Illinois

News Articles

Other Activities

    • Uncategorized
      • Janet Floyd reviews Stacy Alaimo, Undomesticated Ground. Journal of American Studies. 36.2 August, 2002: 319-20.
      • Olivia P. Banner reviews Alaimo and Hekman, eds., Material Feminisms (Indiana UP: 2008).
      • Jana Tschurenev (Zurich) reviews Alaimo and Hekman, Material Feminisms.
      • Anna Carastathis reviews Alaimo and Hekman's Material Feminisms
      • Iris Van der Tuin reviews Alaimo and Hekman's Material Feminisms
      • John Bruni Reviews Stacy Alaimo's Bodily Natures: Science, Environment and the Material Self
      • Veronica Vold, "Finding the Human in 'the messy, contingent, emergent mix of the material world,' Embodiment, Place, and Materiality in Stacy Alaimo's Bodily Natures"
      • Review of Bodily Natures. Astrida Neimanis,Theory That Matters: Feminism, Porous Boundaries and the New Materialisms
      • Sarah Jaquette Ray reviews Bodily Natures in ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment. 19.1. 2012.
      • Cheryl Lousley reviews Bodily Natures in The Goose.
      • "Taking Turns with Feminism: One More Turn, Material Feminisms." Anders Blok's review of Alaimo and Hekman, Material Feminisms.
      • Greg Garrard, "Ecocriticism," The Year's Work in Cultural and Critical Theory, 2010 (Review of Bodily Natures)
      • Serenella Iovino, "Steps to a Material Ecocriticism. The Recent Literature About the “New Materialisms” and Its Implications for Ecocritical Theory,"
      • Levi Bryant, "Stacy Alaimo: Porous Bodies and Trans-Corporeality."
      • "Bodily Natures: The Environmental Activism of the Posthuman.” Talk for OneBook, March, 2010.
      • “How to Build a Self When Your Body is Everywhere: Science, Power, and Environmentalism,” for Conversations ’06: Power, UTA Faculty Brown Bag Lecture Series, Spring 2007.
      • “The Material Turn: Corporeal Feminisms, Environmental Feminisms, and Material Ethics,” Center for Theory. Spring, 2004.
      • “Environmental Justice, Environmental Feminism” for the Feminist Majority Leadership Alliance, a student group, November, 2004.
      • “The Gender of Nature and the Undomesticated Ground of Feminism.” Women’s Studies Lectures. University of Texas at Arlington, September, 1996.
      • “Resistant Performances: Border Brujos and other Postmodern Critiques of Multiculturalism.” Hermann Colloquium, University of Texas at Arlington, October 11th, 1995.
      • Spoke to Gorgias, a graduate student group, 1995, 2000; and Sigma Tau Delta, an undergraduate honors society,1998.
      • Presentation on the Census of Marine Life for Parents Day, October 2011.
      • “Feminist Literature of the 1960s and 1970s.” The Writer’s Garret, Dallas, TX, October, 200
      • Advisory Board. Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism (UK). 2010--
      • Editorial Board, Fast Capitalism, Fall 2004—present.
      • Consultant for Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers 2004—2010, and from 1992 to 2000.
      • Specialist Reader, MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the United States, 2006—2010.
      • Board Member. Society for the Study of American Women Writers, 2000-2004.
      • Editorial Board, Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers, 2000-2004
      • Editorial Board, Resilience: A Journal of Sustainable Critique. 2011-- (new digital, peer-reviewed journal)
      • Editor. Critical Ecologies Thread. Electronic Book Review. 2012---
      • Advisory Board, Itineration: Cross-Disciplinary Studies in Rhetoric, Media, and Culture,
      • Editorial Board, Configurations, Official Journal for the Society for Literature, Science and the Arts 2013-
      • Advisory Board for Ecozon@. European Journal of Literature, Culture and Environment.
      • PhD Committees Directed/Directing
      • PhD Committees Served on/Serving on:
      • MA Committees Served on/Serving On
      • MA Committees Directed/Directing
      • ASLE (Association for the Study of Literature and Environment) Award for Ecocriticism, 2011. For Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self (University of Indiana Press: 2010).
      • Friends of the Princeton University Library, Library Research Grant, one week, June 2011
      • 2013 College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Research Achievement Award
      • I currently serve as the Coordinator for the ESS Minor, and keep a web page and a FB group (ESS Minors at UTA) for all ESS students and faculty.
      • Video interview with Jeanne Hamming, for Ecology, Technology, Culture: An online resource center for Environmental Humanities. January, 2006.
      • Video interview with Peter Shea, for “The Bat of Minerva.” University of Minnesota, Institute for Advanced Study.
      • Conference Panels
      • “Material Engagements: Science, Science Studies, and Ecocriticism,” for the ASLE “Theorizing Ecocriticism” panel, MLA. December 2008, San Francisco.
      • “Material Memoirs: Science, Autobiography, and the Material Self,” for Women’s Studies in Language and Literature Panel. MLA. December 2008, San Francisco.
      • “Out of Our Depths: Oceanic Challenges to Environmental Theory and Animal Studies” MLA, January, 2011.
      • Chair and Respondent. “The Nature of Culinary Choices: The Rhetoric and Discourse of Foodways and Environment.” ASA (American Studies Association), October 2010.
      • Organizer and chair of two ASLE/SLSA panels for the June 2009 ASLE, Victoria, Canada, “SLSA I: Global Warming,” and “SLSA II: Bodies/Nature/Science.”
      • “Bodily Natures: Science, Environment and the Material Self.” June 2009 ASLE, Victoria, Canada.
      • “New Directions in Ecocriticism: Scientific Knowledge and Literary Critique.” Special Session Roundtable
      • “New Materialism at the Bottom of the Sea.” MLA Division on Science and Literature. Jan.2013.
      • The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, Inducted 2013
      • Heather Sullivan reviews Stacy Alaimo's Bodily Natures: Science, Environment and the Material Self
      • Greg Garrard, "Ecocriticism: Review of 2007-2008"
      • Shannon Sullivan, "Feminist Spaces." Review of Stacy Alaimo, Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space
      • Meredith Criglington, "Preoccupied Spaces." Review of Stacy Alaimo, Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space
      • Barbara Ryan. Review of Stacy Alaimo, Undomesticated Ground.
      • Connie Russell. Review of Stacy Alaimo, Undomesticated Ground.
      • Catriona Sandilands. Review of Stacy Alaimo, Undomesticated Ground.
      • Lisa Logan. Review of Stacy Alaimo, Undomesticated Ground.

Research and Expertise

  • Research Interests➢ American literature and cultural studies: 19th and 20th century U.S. literature, film, activism, performance, visual culture; multicultural literatures, feminist literatures. ➢ Trans-disciplinary critical theory: critical theory, gender theory; cultural studies, environmental theories, posthumanism; animal studies; new materialism; material feminism; the anthropocene. ➢ Environmental humanities: environmental literature, film, culture, and theory; gender and environment, environmental health, environmental justice. ➢ Science Studies; feminist, environmental, and marine science studies.

    For more information about Dr. Alaimos research and teaching, visit her web site: https://www.stacyalaimo.com. Professor Alaimo is an internationally recognized scholar of the environmental humanities, science studies, and gender theory. She has published many essays in these fields, along with two monographs: Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space (Cornell University Press, 2000) and Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self (Indiana University Press, 2010). Bodily Natures won the ASLE Award for Ecocriticism in 2011 and was honored with a plenary special book session at the International Association of Environmental Philosophy. Alaimo was interviewed about Bodily Natures in the New Book Network. Bodily Natures is being cited across many fields, and has had a wide, international impact on the development of "material ecocriticism" and environmental new materialisms. Alaimo developed the now widely-used concept of "trans-corporeality" in Bodily Natures. Alaimo also edited the stellar, influential theory collection, Material Feminisms, with UTA Professor Susan J. Hekman (Indiana UP. 2008).  Material Feminisms has also had a wide, international impact, discerning, assembling and developing "material feminisms" as a field and contributing to new materialisms generally. Alaimos first book, Undomesticated Ground was widely reviewed and is widely cited--across the humanities, social sciences, and environmental humanities. Along with these books, Professor Alaimo has also published many essays and book chapters in environmental humanities, science studies, and feminist theory, on such subjects as environmental literature and film, environmental art and architecture, performance art, feminist theory and nature, environmental pedagogy, gender and climate change, the science and culture of sexually diverse animals,  anthropocene feminisms, and ocean conservation, posthumanism, and animal studies. Two theoretical challenges--which have ethical and political ramifications--have driven much of her work. First, how can postmodern, postructuralist, and otherwise gender-minimizing femininisms engage with the perilous discursive territory of "nature" ? Second, how can scholars in the environmental humanities retain incisive practices of discursive critique while forging methodologies that account for the significance and agency of material forces? The second question has led Professor Alaimo to develop environmentally-oriented models of new materialism. Alaimos work forges connections across the divided realms of science, philosophy, literature, and popular culture.  She has given many invited and plenary talks on these subjects, both nationally and internationally, in Canada, Denmark, Sweden, Austria, and Germany. In Fall 2011 served as an Honorary Guest Researcher at TEMA, an interdisciplinary studies program, in Linköping Sweden and taught doctoral seminar for European graduate students. ~~~~~ She is currently working within the interdisciplinary fields of environmental humanities and science studies; investigating possibilities for new materialisms as well as the intersections between science and aesthetics. She is currently writing Blue Ecologies: Science, Aesthetics, and the Creatures of the Abyss.  Part of this research was conducted with the help of a Friends of the Princeton University Library Research Grant, which enabled her to do research in the William Beebe Archives in June 2011.Another book, Exposed: Environmental Politics and Pleasures in Posthuman Times was published by the University of Minnesota Press in 2016.  She was invited to serve as the volume editor for Matter, for which she created 30+ topics and scopes for each chapter, found contributors, edited each essay for content, organization, and style and wrote the introduction. Matter is a volume in the Gender series of MacMillian Interdisiciplinary Handbooks, forthcoming 2016.

    Dr. Alaimo served as the the Editor of the Critical Ecologies stream of the Electronic Book Review, http://www.electronicbookreview.com/thread/criticalecologies, on the MLA Division for the study of Literature and Science, and the inaugural committee for the new MLA Forum on Ecocriticism and the Environmental Humanities. Perhaps her most prestigious international invitation was to serve as a member of international evaluation panel of the MISTRA/FORMAS Environmental Humanities Initiative, The Swedish Research Council Stockholm, Sweden, February 7-15 2013. The team of experts evaluated the lengthy research proposals of six different research teams, interviewed each of the six teams, evaluated, discussed, made a recommendation and wrote a report for MISTRA/FORMAS. Dr. Alaimo will be the Wang Distinguished Professor-in-Residence, George Washington University, October 10-16, 2016 and will present the Robert E. Knoll lecture, University of Nebraska, English Department. March 27-29, 2017.  Dr. Alaimo will be the Series Editor, with Nicole Starosielski, of "Elements" at Duke University Press, starting in 2016.

Publications

      Book Review In-press
      • Review of Bodies of Water: Posthuman Feminist Phenomenology, Astrida Neimanis, for Green Letters, 2017. 

        {Book Review }

      Popular Press Article In-progress
      Journal Article Published
      • “From Rusty Genetics to Octopussy’s Garden.” Roundtable on Middlesex, edited by Cate Sandilands and Kaitland Blanchard.  Resilience. Submitted. 

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter Accepted
      • Afterword. Ocean Legalities: The Law and Life of the Sea, ed. Irus Braverman and Elizabeth Johson, forthcoming

        {Book Chapter }
      In-progress
      • “When the Newt Turned Off the Lights.” Teaching Climate Change in Literary and Cultural Studies, ed. Siperstein and LeMenager.  In progress.

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Book Accepted
      • Series Editor of "Elements," a series of books for Duke University Press, with Nicole Starosielski, starting in 2016.

        {Book }
      In-progress In-progress
      • Composing Blue Ecologies: Science, Aesthetics, and the Creatures of the Abyss [in progress]

        {Peer Reviewed }
      In-progress
      • Blue Ecologies: Science, Aesthetics, and the Creatures of the Abyss

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Exhibition Catalog In-press
      • Invited essay for exhibition catalogue,(German translation) “Anthropocene Materiality: Puddles, Purses, Jellies, and Nests,” for “Nature after Nature,” exhibition catalog, curated by Susanne Pfeffer, Kassell: Fridericianum Museum, forthcoming 2017.

        {Exhibition Catalog }

      Anthology Work/Essay Published
      • "Feminist Science Studies and Ecocriticism: Aesthetics and Entanglement in the Deep Sea."    Oxford Handbook of Ecocriticism, edited by Greg Garrard, Oxford UP, 2014.

        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Book Chapter 2017
      • “Unmoor.”  Veer Ecology: Keywords for Ecotheory.  Ed. Jeffrey J. Cohen and Lowell Duckert, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press,  2017.

        {Book Chapter }
      2017
      • “Your Shell on Acid: Material Immersion, Anthropocene Dissolves.” Richard Grusin and John C. Blum eds. Anthropocene Feminisms (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017).

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2017
      • “The Anthropocene at Sea: Paradox, Anachronism, Compression.” Routledge Companion to the Environmental Humanities, ed. Jon Christensen, Ursula K. Heise, Michelle Niemann, 2017.

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2017
      • “Material Feminism in the Anthropocene.” Äsberg and Braidotti, Feminist Companion to the Posthumanities, forthcoming.

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2017
      • “Introduction: Gender and Matter.” In Matter, volume editor, Alaimo, in the Gender series, MacMillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks, Editor, renee hoogland; Associate Editors, Nicole Fleetwood and Iris Van der Tuin. Forthcoming 2017.

        {Book Chapter }
      2017
      • “Transcorporeal.” Entry for The Posthuman Glossary, on the concept that I developed. Edited. Rosi Braidotti. Bloomsbury Academic. Forthcoming.

        {Book Chapter }
      2017
      • Preface. Disability Studies and the Environmental Humanities. Ed. Sarah Jacquette Ray and Jay Sibara. University of Nebraska Press, forthcoming 2017. Invited.

        {Book Chapter }
      2017
      • “Unmoor.”  Veer Ecology: Keywords for Ecotheory.  Ed. Jeffrey J. Cohen and Lowell Duckert, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.  Invited, forthcoming 2017.

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Book Review 2017
      • Teaching with Feminist Materialisms, ed. Peta Hinton and Pat Treusch, for Feminist Review, forthcoming, 2017.

        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2017
      • (Portuguese translation) of my essay “Trans-corporeal Feminisms and the Ethical Space of Nature,” originally published in Material Feminisms. Trans. Susana Funck, for special section on New (Feminist) Materialisms in Revista Estudos Feministas (Brazil). Forthcoming 2017. 

        {Journal Article }
      2017
      •  (Polish translation)  “Deviant Agents: The Science, Culture, and Politics of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity,” chapter from Bodily Natures, translated by Monika Rogowska- Stangret, entitled, "Dewiacyjni sprawcy. Nauka, kultura oraz polityka wieloczynnikowej nadwrażliwości chemicznej," , "Przegląd Filozoficzno-Literacki" 1 (46), 2017, p. 33-70.  http://www.pfl.uw.edu.pl/index.php/pfl/issue/view/41

        {reprint }

      Book 2017
      • Gender: Matter. Volume Editor. Part of the series, Gender, MacMillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks, Editor, renee hoogland; Associate Editors, Nicole Fleetwood and Iris Van der Tuin. Forthcoming 2017. [Created 35+ topics and scopes, found contributors, edited 30+ essays for content, organization, and style. Wrote introduction to the volume.]

        {Book }

      Book 2016
      • Exposed: Environmental Politics and Pleasures in Posthuman Times (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2016).

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Exhibition Catalog 2016
      • Contributed 10 entries (prose poems/creative nonfiction/compressed research essays) to Marina Zurkow’s book/catalogue project, “More & More” “ a multi-modal art and research project examining the complex interplay between global trade, shipping, import / export, legal / illegal exchange of goods and people, the deep sea, deep time, and the weather.”  Published in book form,  “More & More: A Guide to the Harmonized System” (Punctum Books: Brooklyn, 2016) and to appear as part of installations, http://punctumbooks.com/titles/moremore-a-guide-to-the-harmonized-system/

        {Exhibition Review }

      Book Review 2016
      • Review of Urban Ecologies: City Space, Material Agency, and Environmental Politics in Contemporary Culture, by Christopher Schliephake, (Lexington Books, 2014) Green Letters: Studies in Ecocriticism, 2016

        {Book Review }

      Book Chapter 2016
      • “Ecology," Invited, foundational essay for Sources, Perspectives, and Methodologies, primer volume of the Gender series, Macmillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks, MacMillan Cengage, 2016.

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2016
      •  “Introduction: Gender and Matter.” In Matter, volume editor, Alaimo, part of the Gender series, MacMillan Interdisciplinary Handbooks, Editor, renee hoogland; Associate Editors, Nicole Fleetwood and Iris Van der Tuin.  2016.

        {Book Chapter }
      2016
      • “When the Newt Turned Off the Lights.” Teaching Climate Change in Literary and Cultural Studies, ed. Siperstein and LeMenager. Routledge, 2016. Invited. 

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Popular Press Article 2016 2016
      Encyclopedia Entry 2016
      • (Greek translation) “Eluding Capture: The Science, Culture and Pleasure of “Queer” Animals,” translated by John Giannis, for a DIY activist zine, 2016. 

        {Encyclopedia Entry }

      Exhibition Catalog 2015
      • Artist Collaboration. Swam with Irish swim artist Vanessa Daws at BABEL 2014 in Santa Barbara, CA, in the event “Swimography,” and wrote a brief account of the experience which she included in her essay “Psychoswimography: Santa Barbara,” in Visual Artists Newssheet, March-April 2015. http://visualartists.ie/category/van-ebulletin/visual-artists-news-sheet/  My quote also included in the artist’s book, Psychoswimography: Santa Barbara, 2015.

        {Exhibition Catalog }

      Book Chapter 2015
      • "Elemental Love in the Anthropocene." Response Essay. Elemental Ecocriticism. Ed, Jeffery J. Cohen and Lowell Ducker. University of Minnesota Press. 

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2015
      • “Nature.” Oxford Feminist Theory Handbook, ed. Lisa Jane Disch and Mary Hawkesworth 

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2015
      •  “Animals.” Invited essay for Keywords in the Study of Environment and Culture, ed. Joni Adamson, William Gleason, David N. Pellow.  2015.

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Journal Article 2015
      Book Chapter 2014
      • “Oceanic Origins, Plastic Activism, and New Materialism at Sea” Invited essay for Material Ecocriticism, edited by Serenella Iovino, Serpil Oppermann, University of Indiana Press, 2014.

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2014

      Journal Article 2014
      • “Bring your Shovel.” Manifesto for inaugural issue of Resilience. January 2014.

        {Journal Article }

      Exhibition Catalog 2013
      • Excerpt from “Violet-Black: Ecologies of the Abyssal Zone,” in Prismatic Ecologies: Ecotheory Beyond Green, edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014, “reprinted” (before it was printed) in Aquatopia, the catalogue from the “Aquatopia” art exhibition, Nottingham Contemporary Museum and Tate St. Ives, United Kingdom, 2013. 

        {reprint }

      Anthology Work/Essay 2013
      • "Violet-Black: Ecologies of the Abyssal Zone." Invited chapter for Prismatic Ecologies, edited by Jeffrey Cohen, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2013
      •  “Jellyfish Science, Jellyfish Aesthetics, or Posthumanism at Sea” Invited essay for Thinking With Water, edited by Janine MacLeod, Cecilia Chen, and Astrida Neimanis. McGill-Queens University Press, Canada.  

        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Journal Article 2013
      • "Darwin, Material Feminisms, and the Nonhuman Turn," invited essay for inaugural issue of J19: The Journal of 19th Century Americanists. 1.2 (Fall 2013): 390-396.

        {Journal Article }
      2013
      • “Thinking as the Stuff of the World.”  Invited essay for inaugural issue of O-Zone: A Journal of Object-Oriented Studies, Issue One, Object/Ecology. Autumn 2013. http://o-zone-journal.org/short-essay-cluster

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2012
      • “Dispersing Disaster: Deepwater Horizon and the Containment of Environmentalism.” Invited essay for an edited collection on Disasters, Environmentalism, and Knowledge, ed. Sylvia Mayer and Christof Mauch, the Bavarian American Academy, the Universitätsverlag, Heidelberg. 
        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 2012
      • "States of Suspension: Trans-corporeality at Sea." Invited essay for special issue of ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, on “Material Ecocriticsm,” ed. by Heather Sullivan and Dana Phillips. 19.3 2012: 476-493.

        {Peer Reviewed }
      2012
      • “Sustainable This, Sustainable That: New Materialisms, Posthumanism, and Unknown Futures.” Invited essay for the PMLA “Theories and Methodologies” section. 127.3 May 2012.

        {Journal Article }
      2012
      •  “New Materialisms, Old Humanisms: or, Following the Submersible.”   Reprinted in Researching Gender, ed. Christina Hughes, SAGE, 2012, Sage Fundamentals of Applied Research series. 

        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 2011
      • Alaimo. Rev. of Bits of Life: Feminism at the Intersections of Media, Bioscience, and Technology., by Anneke Smelik and Nina Lykke. Configurations (Journal for the Society of Literature, Science, and the Arts) 2011.
        {Book Review }
      2011
      • Reviewed by Alaimo. Rev. of Toxic Bodies: Hormone Disruptors and the Legacy of DES,, by Nancy Langston. American Book Review November 2011: 8.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 2011
      • "New Materialisms, Old Humanisms, or, Following the Submersible."  Invited position paper for the "Taking Turns" series.  NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research 19.4: (December 2011): 280-284. http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08038740.asp
        {Journal Article }
      2011
      • "Det nakna ordet. Den protesterande kroppens transkorporala etik."  Swedish translation of "The Naked Word: The Trans-Corporeal Ethics of the Protesting Body." (Trans. Anna Karlsson). TGV, Tidskrift för genusvetenskap (Journal of Gender Studies), 2011: 4. (Invited.) http://www.tidskriftsbutiken.nu/issue_info.php?iss=17644    
        {Journal Article }

      Anthology Work/Essay 2010
      • Alaimo. ""Ecology."  Routledge Companion to Literature and Science. Eds. Clarke, Bruce and Manuela Rossini. New York: Routledge, 2010. 100-111.
        {Anthology Work/Essay }
      2010
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "Eluding Capture: The Science, Culture and Pleasure of "Queer" Animals." Queer Ecologies: Sex, Nature, Biopolitics and Desire. Eds. Mortimer-Sandilands, Catriona and Bruce Erickson. Indiana UP, 2010.
        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Journal Article 2010
      • Alaimo. ""Material Engagements: Science Studies and the Environmental Humanities"." Ecozon@ European Journal on Literature, Culture, and Environment 1.1 (2010): 69-74.
        {Journal Article }
      2010
      • “Displacing Darwin and Descartes: The Bodily Transgressions of Fielding Burke, Linda Hogan, and Octavia Butler,” Excerpted and reprinted in Contemporary Literary Criticism (section on Linda Hogan,) ed. Jeffrey Hunter.  Gale Cenage  166-174.            
        {Journal Article }
      2010
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "The Naked Word: The Intercorporeal Ethics of the Protesting Body." Women and Performance (2010).
        {Journal Article }

      Book 2010
      • Alaimo, Stacy. Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self. Indiana UP, 2010.  Winner of the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE) Book Award, 2011.
        {Book }

      Journal Article 2009
      • Alaimo, S. “Insurgent Vulnerability and the Carbon Footprint of Gender". Women, Gender & Research. (Kvinder, Kon og Forskning, Denmark) (Distributed at COP15 December 2009). 2009, 3.
        {Journal Article }
      2009
      • "“MCS Matters: Material Agency in the Science and Practices of Environmental Illness.”." TOPIA: Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies (2009).
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2008
      • Alaimo. "Ecofeminism without Nature? Questioning the Relation between Feminism and Environmentalism.". The International Feminist Journal of Politics 2008, 1 (1), 69-74.
        {Journal Article }

      Anthology Work/Essay 2008
      • Alaimo, Stacy and Susan J. Hekman. "Introduction: Emerging Models of Materiality in Feminist Theory." Material Feminisms. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
        {Anthology Work/Essay }
      2008
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "Trans-Corporeal Feminisms and the Ethical Space of Nature." Material Feminisms. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Book Chapter 2008
      • ""The Trouble with Texts, or Teaching Green Cultural Studies in Texas,”." Teaching North American Environmental Literatures. Ed. Frederick O. Waage, Mark Long, and Laird Christensen. MLA, 2008.
        {Book Chapter }

      Book 2008
      • Eds. Alaimo, Stacy and Susan Hekman. Material Feminisms. Indiana University Press.
        {Book }

      Journal Article 2007
      • Review of Robert Markley, Dying Planet:  Mars in Science and the Imagination, forthcoming in Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science and Technology.
        {Journal Article }

      Anthology Work/Essay 2007
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "This is about Pleasure: Human Habitats, Animal Memories, and Corporeal Ethics." Architecture, Ethics, and the Personhood of Place. Eds. Caicco, Gregory. University Press of New England, 2007.
        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Journal Article 2005
      • "'Comrades of Surge': Meridel Le Sueur, Cultural Studies, and the Corporeal Turn." ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment 12.2 (2005): 55-74.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 2001
      • Alaimo, Stacy. Rev. of The Good-Natured Feminist, Catriona Sandilands. Topia: A Canadian Journal of Cultural Studies 2001.
        {Book Review }
      2001
      • Alaimo, Stacy. Rev. of Dream a Little: Land and Social Justice in Modern America, by Dorothee E. Kocks. Western Historical Quarterly 2001: 380.
        {Book Review }

      Book Chapter 2001
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "Discomforting Creatures: Monstrous Natures in Recent Films." Beyond Nature Writing. Ed. Karla Arbruster and Kathleen Wallace. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2001. 279-296.
        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 2000
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "Cultural Difference and Epistemic Rupture: The Vanishing Acts of Guillermo Gómez-Peña and Alfredo Véa Jr." MELUS (Multi-Ethnic Literatures of the U. S.) 25.2 (2000).
        {Journal Article }

      Book 2000
      • Alaimo, Stacy. Undomesticated Ground: Recasting Nature as Feminist Space. Cornell UP, 2000.
        {Book }

      Anthology Work/Essay 1998
      • “Displacing Darwin and Descartes: The Bodily Transgressions of Fielding Burke, Linda Hogan, and Octavia Butler,”  Reprinted as “‘Skin Dreaming’: The Bodily Transgressions of Fielding Burke, Linda Hogan, and Octavia Butler,” in Ecofeminist Literary Criticism: Theory, Interpretation, Pedagogy,  edited by Greta Gaard and Patrick D. Murphy, University of Illinois.
        {Anthology Work/Essay }

      Journal Article 1998
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "The Undomesticated Ground of Feminism: Mary Austin and the Progressive Women Conservationists." Studies in American Fiction 26.1 (1998): 73-96.
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1997
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "Endangered Humans?: Wired Bodies and the Human Wilds." Camera Obscura 40-41 (1997): 227-244.
        {Journal Article }

      Essay 1996
      • Alaimo, Stacy. Feminism, Nature, and Discursive Ecologies, 1996.
        {Essay }

      Book Chapter 1996
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "'Skin Dreaming': The Bodily Transgressions of Fielding Burke, Linda Hogan, and Octavia Butler (Originally, "Displacing Darwin and Descartes: The Bodily Transgressions of Fielding Burke, Linda Hogan, and Octavia Butler)." Ecofeminist Literary Criticism: Theory, Interpretation, Pedagogy. University of Illinois, 1996.
        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 1994
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "Cyborg and Ecofeminist Interventions: Challenges for Environmental Feminism." Feminist Studies 20.1 (1994): 133-152.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Review 1993
      • Alaimo, Stacy. Rev. of Society and Nature, by Peter Dickens. ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment 1993.
        {Book Review }

      Journal Article 1991
      • Alaimo, Stacy. "The Morgesons: A Feminist Dialogue of Bildung and Descent." Legacy: A Journal of Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers 8.1 (1991): 29-37.
        {Journal Article }

Presentations

    • October  2014

      Plenary. Babel Working Group: On the Beach, October 2014

  • Past
    •  
      Invited presentation, “Deviant Agents: The Science, Culture, and Politics of Multiple Chemical Sensitivity” for the symposium “Beyond Environmentalism: Culture, Justice and Global Ecology, American Cultures and Global Contexts, UC Santa Barbara
  • Past
    •  
      Invited Presentation, “Eluding Capture: The Science, Culture and Pleasure of Queer Animals.” Gender, Science, and Critical Animal Studies conference, SUNY Stonybrook
  • Past
    •  
      Invited Paper. Invited Workshop Participant. “Thinking with ‘Organized Waters’: Jellyfish, Siphonophores, and the Limits of Animal Studies” for Thinking With Water workshop. Montreal, CANADA.
  • Past
    •  
      Invited. “Ecocriticism in American Studies.” Three videoconferences with faculty and students in six universities throughout ROMANIA. U. S. Department of State, Bureau of International Information Programs, American Corners Partnership, May 2010.
  • Past
  • Past
    •  
      "What’s Love Got to Do with It?: Dominance, Affection, and Ethical Provocation in the Art of Bethany Krull" Convocation talk for the Meadows Museum, Centenary College, Shreveport LA
  • Past
    •  
      "The Sea Creatures of William Beebe: Science, Aesthetics, Ethics. Talk for Friends of the Princeton University Library.
  • Past
    •  
      Invited talk for "Ecological Movement," George Washington University Medieval and Early Modern Studies Institute
  • Past
    •  
      “Science and Aesthetics in William Beebe’s Elusive Seas,” invited talk for cross-disciplinary workshop, "Underwater Worlds," Stanford Humanities Center, May 18, 2015.

      “Science and Aesthetics in William Beebe’s Elusive Seas,” invited talk for cross-disciplinary workshop, "Underwater Worlds," Stanford Humanities Center, May 18, 2015.

  • Past
    •  
      PLEASE SEE CV FOR ALL INVITED TALKS

      PLEASE SEE MY CV FOR ALL INVITED TALKS.  THERE ARE TOO MANY TO FILL IN HERE AS SEPARATE ENTRIES WITH SEPARATE SCREENS

  • Past
    •  
      NOTE: THIS SECTION IS OUT OF DATE.
      TOO DIFFICULT TO ENTER ALL THIS INFORMATION IN THIS FORM.

Projects

  • 2012
    • Jan 2012 to Jan 2015 Editor: Electronic Book Review. Editor of “Critical Ecologies” Thread. Jan. 2012—August 2014 http://www.electronicbookreview.com/thread/criticalecologies

      NA

      Role: Coinvestigator PI: NA

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Jan 2016 to Present Research Collaborator, (with UTA as a Programme Partner), Consortium of the Environmental Humanities Collaboratory, The Seed Box: A Mistra-Formas Environmental Humanities Collaboratory, (international consortium,Sweden) 2016--2021 (ESTIMATED amount below) sponsored by  - $50000
    • June 2011 to June 2011 “The Sea Creatures of William Beebe: Science, Aesthetics, Ethics ” sponsored by  - $2100

Other Research Activities

  • 2016
  • 2015
    • Professional Recognition
      • Jan 2015 Member and Chair of the inaugural committee of the MLA Forum, Ecocriticism and the Environmental Humanities 2014-2015.

        Member and Chair of the inaugural committee of the MLA Forum, Ecocriticism and the Environmental Humanities 2014-2015.

  • 2014
    • Research Awards
      • 2014 University of Texas at Arlington, Research:

        College of Liberal Arts Outstanding Research Achievement Award, 2013

        Faculty Development Leave, Fall 2013; Fall 2005; Fall 1996.

        University Sustainability Committee Travel Grant, Fall 2013, $500.

        College of Liberal Arts Nominee, NEH Summer Stipend, 2011.

        Fellow, Center for Southwestern Studies, 1998-2001.

        Departmental nominee for UTA’s Outstanding Accomplishment in Research and Creative Activity. 2000, 2010, 2011, 2012

  • 2013
    • Research, Teaching, and Presentation Awards
      • Nov 2013 Research and Professional Awards, Honors, Grants

        Research and Professional Honors, Awards, Grants:

        Member of the inaugural committee of the MLA Forum, Ecocriticism and the Environmental Humanities 2014-2015.

        Invited to serve on the international evaluation panel of the MISTRA Environmental Humanities Initiative, Stockholm, Sweden, February 7-15 2013. MISTRA, The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research; FORMAS, The Swedish Research Council, for Sustainable Development.

        Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and The Material Self (Indiana UP: 2010), presented with the ASLE (Association for the Study of Literature and Environment) Book Award for Scholarly Work of Ecocriticism, 2011.

        Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and The Material Self, featured in a special book session at the International Association of Environmental Philosophy (IAEP), Eugene,Oct. 27, 2013.

        Invited to serve on the International Reference Group for the GEXcel International Collegium for Advanced Transdisciplinary Gender Studies, Sweden, 2013—present. http://www.gexcel.org/?l=en

        Elected to serve on the MLA Division on Literature and Science, 2010-2015.

        Honorary Guest Researcher, TEMA, Linköping University, SWEDEN November-December 2011.

        Invited Scholar, Quadrant Project. University of Minnesota Press, University of Minnesota Institute for Advanced Study, Fall, 2009.

        Invited to teach a European doctoral seminar for Inter-Gender, the Swedish-International Research School in Interdisciplinary Gender Studies, November-December 2011.

        Friends of the Princeton University Library, Library Research Grant, 2011-2012.  (June 2011). William Beebe Archives, “The Sea Creatures of William Beebe: Science, Aesthetics, Ethics” ($2,100).

Other Creative Activities

  • 2016
    • Artist Collaboration
      • Oct 2016 10 entries for Marina Zurkow’s book/catalogue project, More & More: A Guide to the Harmonized System.

        Contributed 10 entries (prose poems/creative nonfiction/compressed research essays) to Marina Zurkow’s book/catalogue project, “More & More” “ a multi-modal art and research project examining the complex interplay between global trade, shipping, import / export, legal / illegal exchange of goods and people, the deep sea, deep time, and the weather.”  Published in book form,  More & More: A Guide to the Harmonized System (Punctum Books: Brooklyn, 2016) and to appear as part of installations, http://punctumbooks.com/titles/moremore-a-guide-to-the-harmonized-system/

        [Refereed/Juried]
  • 2015
    • Artist Collaboration
      • Sept 2015 "Psychoswimography: Santa Barbara"

        Swam with Irish swim artist Vanessa Daws at BABEL 2014 in Santa Barbara, CA, in the event “Swimography,” and wrote a brief account of the experience which she included in her essay “Psychoswimography: Santa Barbara,” in Visual Artists Newssheet, March-April 2015. http://visualartists.ie/category/van-ebulletin/visual-artists-news-sheet/  My quote also included in the artist’s book, Psychoswimography: Santa Barbara, 2015.http://vanessadaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Psychoswimography-Santa-Barbara.pdf

        [Non-refereed/non-juried]

Students Supervised

  • Doctoral
    • Present
    • Present
    • Present
  • Master's
    • Present
    • Present

Collaborators

    • thumbnail
      Duration : June 2005 to June 2008

      Co-edited Material Feminisms (Bloomington: Indiana UP, 2010)

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Nov 2015 to Present

      Research Collaborator within The Seed Box Collaboratory. UTA is a partner institution within the consortium of  The Seed Box – A Mistra-Formas Environmental Humanities Collaboratory, based in University of Linköping, SWEDEN.

    • thumbnail
      Duration : Dec 2015 to Present

      The Seed Box – A Mistra-Formas Environmental Humanities Collaboratory, based in Linköping, SWEDEN.

Courses

      • ENGL 3364-001 Gay and Lesbian Literature

        English 3364/Women’s and Gender Studies 3364 explores a rich and thought provoking range of GLBTQ literature and theory, from England and the U.S.  The readings include canonical novels, modernist “biography,” magical realism, memoir, and poetry--from the 19thcentury to the present. We will discuss LGBTQ histories, narratives, identity formations, cultural politics, and figurations of knowledge and desire.  We will also consider the intersecting categories of race, class, and gender and the tensions between minoritizing and universalizing theories of sexuality. Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, small group work and presentations.  Students will be expected to come to class prepared to participate and contribute to a lively and productive learning environment.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGLISH 4345 Topics in Critical Theory: Animals, Environment, Justice

        Description of Course Content: 

        This class introduces students to new and rapidly expanding fields of theory in the humanities: animal studies, environmental theory, and environmental justice theory.  These fields question fundamental conceptual maps of Western culture such as the binary between animals and humans, nature and culture.  They also insist that environmental concerns should be at the forefront of English studies, the arts, humanities, and social sciences.  We will discuss the ethical and political dimensions of the human treatment of animals and the environment as well as the ways in which the environment is also a social justice concern for different groups of human beings.  Since this is a theory class the emphasis will be on understanding, analyzing, comparing, extending, critiquing, and applying the texts.  We will practice thinking withthese  arguments, concepts, and theories.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • ENGL 4345-001 Topics in Critical Theory: Animals, Environment, Justice

        Description of Course Content: 

        This class introduces students to new and rapidly expanding fields of theory in the humanities: animal studies, environmental theory, and environmental justice theory.  These fields question fundamental conceptual maps of Western culture such as the binary between animals and humans, nature and culture.  They also insist that environmental concerns should be at the forefront of English studies, the arts, humanities, and social sciences.  We will discuss the ethical and political dimensions of the human treatment of animals and the environment as well as the ways in which the environment is also a social justice concern for different groups of human beings.  Since this is a theory class the emphasis will be on understanding, analyzing, comparing, extending, critiquing, and applying the texts.  We will practice thinking withthese  arguments, concepts, and theories.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6370-001 Topics in Literature and Environment: Ocean

        The ocean has been cast as “alien” to the human yet the origin of all life; so immense as to be impervious to anthropogenic harm yet nonetheless in peril; too vast for comprehension and yet compressed into image and narrative. A once neglected area for humanities scholarship, the ocean is now receiving much-deserved attention, in literary studies, history, anthropology, science studies, animal studies, and environmentalism. This course introduces key questions, themes and topics in the blue humanities, from Shakespeare to contemporary cultural studies. We will begin with short introductions to marine biology, ocean history, and the blue humanities, and Shakespeare’s The Tempest with Steve Mentz’s book, Shipwreck Modernity: Ecologies of Globalization, 1550-1719.  Two weeks with Melville’s Moby Dick and one with Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and other readings follow.  The class will then plunge into modernist poetry, followed by a range of contemporary literature and theory including a feminist SF novel, indigenous literature of the Pacific, an AfroFuturist SF novel, and assorted theory, cultural studies, and science studies. The central concerns of the class will be those of animal studies, posthumanism, and environmentalism, along with gender, race, indigeneity, and de/colonialism. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3333-004 DYNAMIC TRADITIONS IN LITERATURE

        This new course, 3333, offers an introduction to literary study that focuses primarily on changes over time to a movement, genre, or motif.  This section of 3333 will focus on oceans as they have been depicted in literature. We will read a diverse range of literature, including a play, poetry, novels, a graphic novel, speculative fiction, and literary criticism, from Homer and Shakespeare to graphic novels and AfroFuturist SF.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4346-001 TOPICS IN THEORIES OF LANGUAGE AND DISCOURSE: ANIMALS

        Course Description: Are humans the only species with language? Can animals talk? If so, can we understand what they are saying? Scientists, philosophers, and other people have been debating these questions for centuries. The answers have broad implications for how we categorize, understand, and treat nonhuman animals and for how we think of ourselves as humans.  This course, situated at the cross roads of Animal Studies, Science studies, and Rhetoric, ranges widely in its topics, disciplines, and concerns, as it discusses “the animal” in language, nonhuman rhetoric, and cross species communications. We will read rhetoric, theory, poetry, (popular) science, transdisciplinary work and two very different sorts of novels. We will also watch films, videos, and other media.  The topics include indigenous ecological knowledges, human exceptionalism and human hierarchies in Western philosophy and science, the dream and practice of cross-species communication, and futuristic projects and visions. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4999-003 Senior Seminar: Contemporary American Poetry

        “Modern American Poetry. . . in its astonishing and endlessly energetic variety. . . is one of the major achievements of human culture.” (Cary Nelson)

        The purpose of art is to lay bare the questions hidden by the answers.” (James Baldwin, quoted by Claudia Rankine.)

        Description of Course Content:

        English 4399: SENIOR SEMINAR is a capstone course for English majors. It is a writing-intensive, seminar-style, in-depth study of a topic. Because this is a capstone course the emphasis will be on independent research, thinking, writing, and learning, as well as on intense in-class discussions.  The topic of this particular section of the Senior Seminar is Contemporary American Poetry.  Specific topics in the class will be: People in Place, Displaced, Roaming; Race in America; Gender, Sex, Love; and Animals, Nature, and Environment. We will examine poetry as an art form as well as discuss its cultural and political contexts and the philosophical questions it provokes.  The course concludes with research papers and presentations on contemporary poetry.   We will take advantage of the extraordinarily rich and informative web site that accompanies Cary Nelson’s Contemporary American Poetry anthology and the Poetry Foundation website. The class is organized as a seminar, focusing on students’ interpretations and culminating with students’ research projects. 

        Required Textbook and Other Course Materials

        Cary Nelson, Anthology of Contemporary American Poetry, Vol. 2, Second Edition

        ISBN-13: 978-0199920730; ISBN-10: 0199920737

        Claudia Rankine, Citizen, An American Lyric, Graywolf Press

        Juliana Spahr, Well Then There Now, Black Sparrow Books

        One or two more books of poetry by a poet of your choice (for your final seminar paper).

        Access to the internet in order to prepare for each class period.

        Recommended Books (to read on your own if you so wish)

        Stephen Burt, This Poem is You: 60 Contemporary American Poems and How to Read Them

        Robert Dale Parker, How to Interpret Literature:  Critical Theory for Literary and Cultural Studies (if you need a theory review or did not gain a background in critical theory within 2350.)

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENG 2350 English 2350: INTRODUCTION TO TEXTUAL ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        Course Description

         “Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors” (UTA Catalog). This course, a required core course for English majors, is an introduction to different practices of analysis and interpretation, from the basic to the more advanced skills and methods of English Studies.   We will begin by studying language itself as historical and cultural site; then discuss the production, media, and dissemination of particular texts.  We will then work on developing everyone’s close reading skills, by analyzing and interpreting poetry, two novels, and a film. Much of the course however, will introduce students to a wide range of theoretical approaches to textual analysis and interpretation.  Along with literary texts we will read theory and criticism that address the most significant questions in the Humanities as we discuss the benefits and the limitations of different critical approaches for literary and cultural analysis. Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, individual presentations, exercises, small group work, and small group presentations.  Requirements include:  a poetry analysis, an application paper on one critical theory, a research paper, an individual presentation, a mid-term exam and a comprehensive final exam.  Careful, thoughtful reading and active, informed participation is crucial for success in this class.

        Required books, films, and other materials

        Robert Dale Parker, How to Interpret Literature: Critical Theory for Literary and Cultural Studies, (third edition, 2014), ISBN-13: 978-0199331161

        William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying (the corrected text)

        Ana Castillo, So Far From God

        A Short Guide to Writing About Film (Corrigan, any edition)

        You will be required to obtain and watch Hitchcocks’s film Vertigo. (You will need to purchase or rent this film yourself.)

        Highly recommended: MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, Seventh Edition.

        Additional readings available on the Blackboard page for our class.

        Access to a computer, a printer, the internet, and a stapler.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3364-001 Gay and Lesbian Literature

        Course Description: English 3364/Women’s and Gender Studies 3364/Honors 3304 explores a rich and thought provoking range of GLBTQ literature and theory, from England and the U.S.  The readings include canonical novels and popular (even pulp) fiction, modernist “biography,” magical realism, and poetry--from the 19th century to the present. We will discuss GLBTQ histories, narratives, identity formations, cultural politics, and figurations of knowledge and desire.  We will also consider the intersecting categories of race, class, and gender and the tensions between minoritizing and universalizing theories of sexuality.  Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, small group work and presentations.  Students will be expected to come to each class prepared to participate and create a lively and productive learning environment.

        Required texts:

        Michael Bronski, A Queer History of the United States, Beacon Press

        The Uncensored Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde, Nicholas Frankel, Belknap Press, 2012 ASIN: B00EB0KTUG

        Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness, Anchor Press, 1990

        Virginia Woolf, Orlando, A Biography, Annotated Edition, Mariner Books

        Ann Bannon, Beebo Brinker, Clies Press, 2001

        Randall Kenan, A Visitation of Spirits

        Edmund White, The Beautiful Room is Empty

        Sarah Schulman Rat Bohemia

        Pedro Lemebel, My Tender Matador: A Novel, Grove Press, Trans. Katherine Silver

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 3364-001 GAY AND LESBIAN LITERATURE

        Course Description: English 3364/Women’s and Gender Studies 3364/Honors 3304 explores a rich and thought provoking range of GLBTQ literature and theory, from England and the U.S.  The readings include canonical novels and popular (even pulp) fiction, modernist “biography,” magical realism, and poetry--from the 19th century to the present. We will discuss GLBTQ histories, narratives, identity formations, cultural politics, and figurations of knowledge and desire.  We will also consider the intersecting categories of race, class, and gender and the tensions between minoritizing and universalizing theories of sexuality.  Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, small group work and presentations.  Students will be expected to come to each class prepared to participate and create a lively and productive learning environment.

        Required texts:

        Michael Bronski, A Queer History of the United States, Beacon Press

        The Uncensored Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde, Nicholas Frankel, Belknap Press, 2012 ASIN: B00EB0KTUG

        Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness, Anchor Press, 1990

        Virginia Woolf, Orlando, A Biography, Annotated Edition, Mariner Books

        Ann Bannon, Beebo Brinker, Clies Press, 2001

        Randall Kenan, A Visitation of Spirits

        Edmund White, The Beautiful Room is Empty

        Sarah Schulman Rat Bohemia

        Pedro Lemebel, My Tender Matador: A Novel, Grove Press, Trans. Katherine Silver

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENG 2350 English 2350: INTRODUCTION TO TEXTUAL ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        Course Description

         “Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors” (UTA Catalog). This course, a required core course for English majors, is an introduction to different practices of analysis and interpretation, from the basic to the more advanced skills and methods of English Studies.   We will begin by studying language itself as historical and cultural site; then discuss the production, media, and dissemination of particular texts.  We will then work on developing everyone’s close reading skills, by analyzing and interpreting poetry, short stories, a novel, and a film. Much of the course however, will introduce students to a wide range of theoretical approaches to textual analysis and interpretation.  Along with literary texts we will read theory and criticism that address the most significant questions in the Humanities as we discuss the benefits and the limitations of different critical approaches for literary and cultural analysis. Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, individual presentations, exercises, small group work, and small group presentations.  Requirements include:  a poetry analysis, an application paper on one critical theory, a research paper, an individual presentation, and a comprehensive final exam.  Careful, thoughtful reading and active, informed participation is crucial for success in this class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory and Practice

        Course Description

        "Core graduate course, introduction to graduate study in English. Covers a wide range of methodological and theoretical approaches to, as well as current issues in, criticism, rhetoric, and literary studies. Enrollment requires the approval of the Graduate Advisor in English"  (UTA Catalog). This course will introduce graduate students to important theories and methodologies in English studies and the interdisciplinary humanities.  We will also briefly consider issues related to graduate school and to the larger profession.  Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, and presentations. Active, engaged, participation in class discussions is essential.  At least 8 weekly papers and four presentations will be required.

        Required Texts:

        William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying. (Vintage: The Corrected Text)

        Ana Castillo, So Far from God

        Robert Dale Parker, How to Interpret Literature: Critical Theory for Literary and Cultural Studies.  (third edition, 2014), ISBN-13: 978-0199331161

        Robert Dale Parker, Critical Theory: A Reader for Literary and Cultural Studies. 2012,

         ISBN-13: 978-0199797776

        Rosi Braidotti, The Posthuman (Polity, 2013) 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6340-001 Metacritical Theory (Heidegger)

        English 6340: Metacritical Theory:

                          Poststructuralism, Biopolitics and the (Material) Human

        Wednesdays 6-8:50                                                                                      Carlisle 201

        Course Description: 

        This class traces the shift from postmodernisms, poststructuralisms, and other discursively oriented theories toward new materialisms and biopolitics. The course will focus on the constitution of the human (and its others) within various conceptualizations, theories, and figurations.  What is it to be human in the work of Derrida, Delueze and Guattari, Agamben or Barad for example?  What do poststructuralism, the rejection of modernism, new materialism, and the nonhuman turn mean for how we understand “the human.” Is there, can there be, any such thing as “the human”?  The course is broadly conceived to include many different topics, such as race, indigeneity, gender, sexuality, environmentalism, science studies, posthumanism, ethics, and politics.  The course concludes by asking, with Catherine Malabou--who will be speaking at UTA in February--“What  Should We Do with our Brains?”

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3366-001 Topics in Literature and Environment

        This course counts for the English major, the Environmental and Sustainability Studies minor, the Environment concentration in the English major and the Theory concentration in the English major.

         We will watch and discuss a wide range of films about environmentalism, environmental justice, and animal studies, ranging from animation (anime), science fiction, documentary, dramas, and activist films.  We will also read environmental and animal studies theory and criticism.

        This lively, discussion-oriented class will introduce how to analyze and interpret films, as it introduces major concepts in environmental studies and sustainability. For the final project, students will have a choice between writing a research paper, doing a service-learning project, or creating a digital media project or short video.

        [NOTE: I was assigned this course very recently, so I am still constructing the actual syllabus.  Please stay posted. I will upload the syllabus as soon as it is completed.] 

        If there is a film or topic you would really like to see included in the course, feel free to email me: alaimo@uta.edu.  More information about my classes and teaching can be found at: http://www.uta.edu/english/alaimo/teaching.html  and http://www.uta.edu/english/alaimo/For%20Undergrads.html

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6370-001 English 6370: Thinking with Plants, Animals, and Materialites Thursdays 6-8:50

        Eduardo Kohn asks, “Can forests think?”  A vital challenge for the environmental humanities is the call to think with life forms and systems that have traditionally eluded the humanities because they are outside the social, the cultural, and the linguistic, as those domains have been defined.  This interdisciplinary seminar will consider how to think with plants, animals, and inhuman material systems, by examining recent scholarship in animal studies, plant studies, anthropology, and material ecocriticism, as well as works of literature, film, and art. We will discuss how thought, representation, and signification are redefined when we think with creatures and material agencies that are not contained by the human. Question of scale, material agency, biosemiotics, extinction, multispecies ethnography, the ecodelic, and more will most likely make themselves known.  Texts will include: Jakob von Uexküll, A Foray into the Worlds of Animals and Humans: with A Theory of Meaning, Donna Haraway, When Species Meet; Eduardo Kohn, How Forests Think; Barbara Gowdy, The White Bone; Michael Marder, Plant Thinking: A Philosophy of Vegetal Life, Ruth Ozeki, All Over Creation; Daniel Chamovitz What A Plant Knows: A Field Guide to the Senses; Opermann and Iovino, Material Ecocrticism; Jeffrey J. Cohen, Prismatic Ecologies; Elizabeth Ellsworth and Jamie Kruse, Making the Geologic Now; articles and chapters, by Stacy Alaimo, Jeffery J. Cohen, Claire Colebrook, Richard Doyle, Stephanie LeMenager, and Katherine Yusoff; selected poetry, films, web sites, and art.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3364-001 Gay and Lesbian (GLBTQ) Literature

        Course Description: English 3364 (crosslisted as Women’s and Gender Studies 3364) explores a rich and thought provoking range of GLBTQ literature and theory, from England and the U.S.  The readings include canonical novels and popular (even pulp) fiction, modernist “biography” and contemporary autobiography, magical realism, and poetry--from the 19th century to the present. We will discuss GLBTQ histories, narratives, identity formations, cultural politics, and figurations of knowledge and desire.  We will also consider the intersecting categories of race, class, and gender and the tensions between minoritizing and universalizing theories of sexuality.  Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, small group work and presentations.  Students will be expected to come to each class prepared to participate.

        Required texts:

        Michael Bronski, A Queer History of the United States

        The Uncensored Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde, Nicholas Frankel, Belknap Press, 2012 ASIN: B00EB0KTUG

        Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness, Anchor Press, 1990

        Virginia Woolf, Orlando, A Biography, Annotated Editon

        Ann Bannon, Beebo Brinker, Clies Press, 2001

        Randal Kenan, A Visitation of Spirits,

        Edmund White, The Beautiful Room is Empty

        Sarah Schulman Rat Bohemia

        Jamison Green, Becoming a Visible Man   

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 3364-001 Gay and Lesbian (GLBTQ) Literature

        Course Description: English 3364 (crosslisted as Women’s and Gender Studies 3364) explores a rich and thought provoking range of GLBTQ literature and theory, from England and the U.S.  The readings include canonical novels and popular (even pulp) fiction, modernist “biography” and contemporary autobiography, magical realism, and poetry--from the 19th century to the present. We will discuss GLBTQ histories, narratives, identity formations, cultural politics, and figurations of knowledge and desire.  We will also consider the intersecting categories of race, class, and gender and the tensions between minoritizing and universalizing theories of sexuality.  Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, small group work and presentations.  Students will be expected to come to each class prepared to participate.

        Required texts:

        Michael Bronski, A Queer History of the United States

        The Uncensored Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde, Nicholas Frankel, Belknap Press, 2012 ASIN: B00EB0KTUG

        Radclyffe Hall, The Well of Loneliness, Anchor Press, 1990

        Virginia Woolf, Orlando, A Biography, Annotated Editon

        Ann Bannon, Beebo Brinker, Clies Press, 2001

        Randal Kenan, A Visitation of Spirits,

        Edmund White, The Beautiful Room is Empty

        Sarah Schulman Rat Bohemia

        Jamison Green, Becoming a Visible Man   

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-001 Modern American Poetry

        “Modern American Poetry. . . in its astonishing and endlessly energetic variety. . . is one of the major achievements of human culture” (Cary Nelson)

        Description of Course Content:

        English 4399: SENIOR SEMINAR is a capstone course for English majors. It is a writing-intensive, seminar-style, in-depth study of a topic. The Prerequisites for this course are:  ENGL 2350 and completion of 18 hours of required 3000 - 4000 level English courses.  Because this is a capstone course the emphasis will be on independent research, thinking, writing, and learning, as well as on intense in-class discussions.  The topic of this particular section of the Senior Seminar is Modern American Poetry. We will discuss an exciting range of 20th-Century American poetry, including the following topics:  American visions and the poetics of dissent; modernisms and the Harlem Renaissance; gender, sex, love, desire;  animals, nature, environment.  We will examine poetry as an art form as well as discuss its cultural and political contexts and the philosophical questions it provokes. Students may do their final projects on a 20th century American poet of their choice or on a thematic topic of their choice.  We will take advantage of the extraordinarily rich and informative web site that accompanies Cary Nelson’s magnificent Modern American Poetry anthology.  The class is organized as a seminar, focusing on students’ interpretations and culminating with students’ research projects. 

        Required Textbook and Other Course Materials

        Anthology of Modern American Poetry, ed. Cary Nelson, Oxford.

        You will need access to the web in order to prepare for each class period.

        Access to a printer and a stapler.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6360-001 Graduate Seminar: Gender and Sex in the Wake of Social Construction.

        This introduction to feminist theory, gender theory, feminist science studies, and queer theory will focus both on the importance of social construction to these fields and the recent material turn, which complements and critiques social constructionist theories.  The course will include difference feminism, material feminisms, feminist body theory, postcolonial queer theory, transgender theory, posthumanist theory, biopolitics, disability studies, theories of race --and the many intersections among these fields. Active, engaged, participation in class discussions is essential. Six papers and two presentations will be required.

      • ENGLISH 6370 Environmental Literature Science Fiction and Posthumanism in the Anthropocene

        Course Description:  The course begins with a strange, forgotten, German SF novel from 1913, but most of the course will focus on recent science fiction that embodies themes, theories, and problematics pertaining to environmentalism, sustainability, posthumanism, and the anthropocene. The readings will challenge us to rethink the category of “nature” within a world where everything has been transformed by human practices. The readings will also challenge us to reconceptualize “human” life within biopolitical, posthumanist, new materialist, and other frames. What happens to human identity, desire, ethics, and politics when the “human” merges with nonhuman animals, technologies, aliens, and the material world? And what sorts of methodologies should the humanities develop to become more relevant to our posthumanist anthropocene era?

        Required Texts: Lesabéndio: An Asteroid Novel, Paul Scheerbart;

        Paolo Bacigalupi, The Windup Girl, Kiji Johnson, At the Mouth of the River of Bees; Atwood, Oryx and Crake; Joan Slonczewski, A Door into Ocean; Peter Watts, Starfish; Larissa Lai, Salt Fish Girl; Geoff Ryman, The Child Garden: A Low Comedy; Cary Wolfe, Beyond the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame.

        We will also readessays by Rosi Braidotti, Donna Haraway, Stefan Helmreich, Bruno Latour, Eva Hayward, Claire Colebrook, Stacy Alaimo, Sheryl Vint, Robert Proctor, and Paul Alberts, which will be available on our Blackboard site, and other essays in Claire Colebrook’s edited “Living Book,” Extinction http://www.livingbooksaboutlife.org/books/Extinction#The_Anthropocene.  We will also discuss Avatar and at least one other film the students will select.

      • ENGLISH 2303 English 2303.003:

        English 2303.  Environmental Literature and Film fulfills UTA’s sophomore literature requirement and the core requirement for a Liberal Arts class.  This course also counts for the new cross-disciplinary minor in Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ESS). 

        Course Description:

        This  course will introduce you to some of the most important environmental issues of the 21st century, via an exciting array of recent literature and films.   The course will cover a range of topics, questions, and issues in the environmental humanities, with a focus on American literature and film. Cultural, historical, philosophical, ethical, and political contexts and questions will be discussed, along with careful analyses and interpretations of the literature and the films. The literature will include novels, autobiography, science fiction, nonfiction, a short story, and poetry.  The class features the following topics: Indigeneity and Environmental Justice;  Toxins, Science, and the “Ordinary Expert”;  and Genetic Engineering, Extinction, and Biodiversity.   Students will take 2 exams, plus a final exam and do two presentations. Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, small group work, presentations and other activities.

        Required Texts

        Louise Erdrich, Tracks. Harper Perennial.

        Suzanne Antonetta, Body Toxic: An Environmental Memoir. Counterpoint. Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake. Anchor.

        E. O Wilson, The Future of Life. Vintage.

        Winter - Intersession - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6370-001 Topics in Literature and Environment: Ocean
        Summer I: 2013: English 6370 Topics in Literature and Environment. Species: Extinction, Engineering, Ethics. T/R 1:00-5:00. This class will begin with Karl Steel's How to Make a Human: Animals and Violence in the Middle Ages. Most of the class will focus on the contemporary period, however, examining the question of species through the work of Darwin, Derrida, Wolfe, Heise, Baghemihl, Escobar, Whatmore and others. Novels will include Atwood's Oryx and Crake and Ozeki's All Over Creation.We will also discuss films, poetry, science writing, (bio)art, and new media. Several papers and presentations will be required but no long seminar paper (due to the summer schedule).
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2013
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        English 2350:Introduction to Textual Analysis and Interpretation Spring 2013 TR 12:30-1:50 "Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors." (UTA Catalog). This course, a required core course for English majors, is an introduction to different practices of analysis and interpretation, from the basic to the more advanced skills and methods of English Studies. Along with literary texts we will read theory and criticism. We will begin by studying language itself as historical and cultural site; then discuss the production, media, and dissemination of particular texts. We will then work on developing everyone's close reading skills, by analyzing and interpreting poetry, short stories, a novel, and a film. Much of the course however, will introduce students to a wide range of theoretical approaches to textual analysis and interpretation. Along with literary texts we will read theory and criticism that address the most significant questions in the Humanities as we discuss the benefits and the limitations of different critical approaches for literary and cultural analysis. Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, individual presentations, exercises, small group work, and small group presentations. Requirements include: a poetry analysis, an application paper on one critical theory, a research paper, an individual presentation, and a comprehensive final exam. Active, prepared participation is crucial for success in this class.

        The syllabus is an example, only. It will be revised. English 2350: INTRODUCTION TO TEXTUAL ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION “All human knowledge takes the form of interpretation” (Walter Benjamin) “My mother is a fish.” (Faulkner, As I Lay Dying) Course Description “Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors” (UTA Catalog). This course, a required core course for English majors, is an introduction to different practices of analysis and interpretation, from the basic to the more advanced skills and methods of English Studies. Along with literary texts we will read theory and criticism. We will begin by studying language itself as historical and cultural site; then discuss the production, media, and dissemination of particular texts. We will then work on developing everyone’s close reading skills, by analyzing and interpreting poetry, short stories, two novels, and a film. Much of the course however, will introduce students to a wide range of theoretical approaches to textual analysis and interpretation. Along with literary texts we will read theory and criticism that address the most significant questions in the Humanities as we discuss the benefits and the limitations of different critical approaches for literary and cultural analysis. Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, individual presentations, exercises, small group work, and small group presentations. Requirements include: a poetry analysis, an application paper on one critical theory, a research paper, an individual presentation, and a comprehensive final exam. Active, prepared participation is crucial for success in this class.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory and Practice

        "Core graduate course, introduction to graduate study in English. Covers a wide range of methodological and theoretical approaches to, as well as current issues in, criticism, rhetoric, and literary studies. Enrollment requires the approval of the Graduate Advisor in English" (UTA Catalog). This course will introduce graduate students to important theories and methodologies in English studies and the interdisciplinary humanities. We will also briefly consider issues related to graduate school and to the larger profession. Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, and presentations. Active, engaged, participation in class discussions is essential. At least 8 weekly papers and four presentations will be required.

        Required Texts: William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying. Robert Dale Parker, Critical Theory: A Reader for Literary and Cultural Studies Susan Merril Squier, Liminal Lives: Imagining the Human at the Frontiers of Biomedicine. Christopher Newfield,Unmaking the Public University: The Forty-Year Assault on the Middle Class Recommended Text Robert Dale Parker, How to Interpret Literature: Critical Theory for Literary and Cultural Studies Second Edition.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6370-001 Topics in Literature and Environment: Ocean

        Summer I: 2013: English 6370 Topics in Literature and Environment. Species: Extinction, Engineering, Ethics. T/R 1:00-5:00. This class will investigate the concept of species, paying particular attention to biodiversity, extinction, and genetic engineering. We will begin with Karl Steel's How to Make a Human: Animals and Violence in the Middle Ages and read a bit of Darwin’s work but most of the class will focus on questions regarding species in the contemporary moment. We will read and discuss two novels, Atwood's Oryx and Crake and Ozeki's All Over Creation, one comic work of nonfiction, Douglas Adams’ Last Chance to See, along with some poetry, science writing, and theory. We will also look at visual art, bioart, multimedia works and websites and watch one film. Active, engaged, participation in class discussions is essential. Six papers and two presentations will be required. Required Texts: • Karl Steel, How to Make a Human: Animals and Violence in the Middle Ages (optional as a paper text; may download the CD instead) Ohio State UP (available on Amazon) • Cary Wolfe, Before the Law: Humans and Other Animals in a Biopolitical Frame • E. O. Wilson, The Future of Life • Douglas Adams, Last Chance to See • Ruth Ozeki, All Over Creation • Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake • Juliana Spahr, Well Then There Now • Film: Sharkwater, • Note: PDFS will be available on our Blackboard page: https://elearn.uta.edu/webapps/login/ You may print out the readings yourself or you may bring electronic versions to class. You must have some annotated version of the readings to work with in class, however. Since I do not usually allow computers in class, please do not open up any other files, email, or internet access during class time—just the electronic versions of the articles. Course Requirements Participation: 10% Weekly Papers and Presentation of those papers: 6 papers, 15% each: 90% You must complete all the required work in order to obtain credit for the course.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3366-001 Literature and Environment: Environmental Film and Theory

        THIS COURSE HAS BEEN CANCELLED FOR FALL 2012.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-001 Senior Seminar: Modern American Poetry

        English 4399: SENIOR SEMINAR is a capstone course for English majors. It is a writing-intensive, seminar-style, in-depth study of a topic. The Prerequisites for this course are: ENGL 2350 and completion of 18 hours of required 3000 - 4000 level English courses. Because this is a capstone course the emphasis will be on independent research, thinking, writing, and learning, as well as on intense in-class discussions. The topic of this particular section of the Senior Seminar is Modern American Poetry. We will discuss an exciting range of 20th-Century American poetry, including the following topics: American visions and the poetics of dissent; modernisms and the Harlem Renaissance; gender, sex, love, desire; animals, nature, environment. We will examine poetry as an art form as well as discuss its cultural and political contexts and the philosophical questions it provokes. Students may do their final projects on a 20th century American poet of their choice or on a thematic topic of their choice. We will take advantage of the extraordinarily rich and informative web site that accompanies Cary Nelson’s magnificent Modern American Poetry anthology. The class is organized as a seminar, focusing on students’ interpretations and culminating with students’ research projects.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5360-001 English 5360: Contemporary Critical Theory: New Materialisms: Bodies, Environments, Agency.

        New materialist theories are emerging across disciplines, fields, and trans-disciplinary areas, including gender theory, environmental theory, science studies, animal studies, cultural studies, medieval studies, new media theory, and literary studies. These theories challenge the parameters of the humanities by insisting upon the significance, signifying force, and agencies of material bodies, objects, and systems and by insisting on interactions between the cultural and the material. This course will introduce a range of new materialist theories including material feminisms, posthumanisms, affect theory, actor-network theory, object-oriented ontology, and thing theory, examining the methods, frameworks, and ethical trajectories of what is being called the â€"nonhuman turn†in contemporary theory. The course will begin by considering what materiality means within familiar theories such as those by Marx, Foucault, and Deleuze and Guattari (via a lecture and brief excerpts). We will then read a gender theory classic, Judith Butler’s Gender Trouble, considering why social construction has been so valuable and why new materialists have insisted that the paradigm needs to be challenged or radically expanded. The bulk of the class will consider a range of new materialist texts, including, Bruno Latour, We Have Never Been Modern, Donna Haraway, When Species Meet, Alaimo and Hekman, Material Feminisms, Nicole Shukin, Animal Capital: Rendering Life in Biopolitical Times; Levi Bryant, The Democracy of Objects; Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, ed., Animal, Vegetable, Mineral: Ethics and Objects; Stacy Alaimo, Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self; Bill Brown, A Sense of Things: The Object Matter of American Literature, as well as essays by Susan J. Hekman, Jane Bennett, Eva Hayward, Rachel Slocum, Rosemarie Garland Thompson, Julie Sze, Tim Morton, Iris Van der Tuin and Rick Dolphjin, and Sarah Ahmed. The course will include visits from scholars who are currently working with new materialism. The reading will be kept to a reasonable amount. Students will be able to tailor their seminar paper toward their own fields and interests. I will post a syllabus on my web site page â€"For Grad Students†and on my UTA Research Profile page before August. Please let me know if there are theorists or topics you are particularly interested in: alaimo@uta.edu. Required Texts: Judith Butler, Gender Trouble (Routledge Classics, 2006) Alaimo and Hekman, Material Feminisms Bruno Latour, We Have Never Been Modern Donna Haraway, When Species Meet Levi Bryant, The Democracy of Objects Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, ed., Animal, Vegetable, Mineral: Ethics and Objects Bill Brown, A Sense of Things: The Object Matter of American Literature Stacy Alaimo, Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self Nicole Shukin, Animal Capital: Rendering Life in Biopolitical Times Mel Y. Chen, Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect Note that Animal, Vegetable, Mineral can be purchased as a paper text but is also available here, free: http://punctumbooks.com/titles/animal-vegetable-mineral-ethics-and-objects/ The Democracy of Objects can be purchased as a paper text but is also available here: http://openhumanitiespress.org/democracy-of-objects.html Note: PDFS will be available on our Blackboard page: https://elearn.uta.edu/webapps/login/

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3366-001 Animal Studies

        This course will focus on the representation of animals in literature and film, raising philosophical and ethical questions about how humans understand, imagine, value, and interact with other animals. We will read and discuss essays, poetry, and the following novels, Anna Sewell, Black Beauty; Jack London, Call of the Wild; Barbara Gowdy, The White Bone; Eva Hornung, Dog Boy; Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?; and Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake. We will also watch the films, Grizzly Man, Being Caribou and Sharkwater. Topics will include animal ethics; animal advocacy and sentiment; animal cultures and modes of being; human/animal crossings and kinships; and animal art. We will be fortunate to hear superb speakers in the Hermann’s lecture series on “Animal Studies,†Friday March 30th! Requirements include: midterm exam, short paper, final project, final exam, group presentation, and attendance at the Hermanns lectures. Class time will consist of lecture, small group work, and much discussion. [This course counts for the cross-disciplinary Environmental and Sustainability Studies (ESS) Minor. For more on the minor see: http://www.uta.edu/supa/undergraduate/esst-minor.php ]

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3370-001 Gender and Environment
        PLEASE NOTE: Dr. Tidwell will be teaching this course in Spring 2012. English 3370: Gender and Environment.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012
      • ENGL 6370-001 Animal Studies

        Course Description: This course will introduce the most significant and compelling questions in the emerging interdisciplinary field of Animal Studies by way of theory, literature, film, and art. We will read essential works of philosophy, theory and cultural studies along with a wide range of literature, including "young adult" novels, science fiction, poetry, and novels that take animal perspectives seriously. Readings will include: Linda Kalof and Amy Fitzgerald, The Animals Reader: The Essential Classic and Contemporary Writings; Donna Haraway, Primate Visions: Gender, Race and Nature in the World of Modern Science; Jacques Derrida, The Animal that Therefore I am; Cary Wolfe, What is Posthumanism?; Nicole Shukin, Animal Capital: Rendering Life in Biopolitical Times; Anna Sewell, Black Beauty; Jack London, Call of the Wild; Herman Melville, Moby Dick; Barbara Gowdy, The White Bone; Eva Hornung, Dog Boy; Philip K. Dick, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake; Becoming Animal, Contemporary Art in the Animal Kingdom, ed. Nato Thompson. Students will have the opportunity to attend the Hermanns lectures and hear Greg Garrard, Peggy McCracken, Cary Wolfe, and Neill Matheson speak on animal studies! (We will cancel one class period to compensate for attendance at the Hermanns lectures.)

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-005 Environmental Literature and Film

        Tuesday/Thursday: 12:30-1:50, UH 108 (Room 108, University Hall.) English 2303: Special Topics in Literature: Environmental Literature and Film will be a large lecture course that introduces students to a range of topics, questions, and issues in the environmental humanities, with a focus on American literature and film. Cultural, historical, and philosophical contexts and frameworks will be discussed, along with careful analyses and interpretations of the literature and the films. The literature will include novels, short stories, poetry, autobiography, travel writing, science fiction, and nonfiction. The films will include animation, documentary, science fiction, and activist films. The class features the following topics: Wilderness Conservation and Modern Environmentalisms; Indigeneity and Environmental Justice; Toxins, Science, and the “Ordinary Expertâ€; Climate Change; and Animals: Genetic Engineering, Biodiversity, Art, and Activism. Students will take 3 exams, plus a final exam. [Enrolled atudents should check their UTA email in the summer for information about how to access the syllabus and other course materials, which will be posted in MavSpace and Blackboard] (The attached syllabus is subject to revision.) [Matthew Lerberg, ABD, will be the Graduate Teaching Assistant for this course.]

        Required books, films, and other materials: Louise Erdrich, Tracks Suzanne Antonetta, Body Toxic Percival Everett, Watershed Mark Lynas, High Tide: The Truth About Climate Change Margaret Atwood, Oryx and Crake Short stories, poetry and essays available in the MavSpace folder and in Blackboard. Films: You will need to purchase or rent these films: Deliverance, Avatar, Princess Mononoke, Silkwood, Gasland, Everything’s Cool: A Toxic Comedy about Global Warming, Crude, Food, Inc. and Sharkwater. [If you do not want to purchase all these films the best thing to do is to sign up for a Netflix account.] Being Caribou (Leanne Allison and Karsten Heuer, 2004) is available free, online, at: http://www.beingcaribou.com/beingcaribou/index.html] You will also need access to a computer and the internet and updated software (see below).

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-001 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        “Teaches students to identify characteristics of genres, to recognize and understand critical and literary terms, and to develop and use methods and strategies for analyzing and interpreting texts. Required for English and English/Education majors†(UTA Catalog). This course, a required core course for English majors, is an introduction to different practices of analysis and interpretation, from the basic to the more advanced skills and methods of English Studies. Along with literary texts we will read theory and criticism. We will begin by studying language itself as historical and cultural site; then discuss the production, media, and dissemination of particular texts. We will then work on developing everyone’s close reading skills, by analyzing and interpreting poetry, short stories, two novels, and a film. Much of the course however, will introduce students to a wide range of theoretical approaches to textual analysis and interpretation. Along with literary texts we will read theory and criticism that address the most significant questions in the Humanities as we discuss the benefits and the limitations of different critical approaches for literary and cultural analysis. Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, individual presentations, exercises, small group work, and small group presentations. Requirements include: a poetry analysis, an application paper on one critical theory, a research paper, an individual presentation, and a comprehensive final exam. Active, prepared participation is crucial for success in this class.

        STUDENTS, please note: Be sure to check your UTA email account for information about this course! Also, we will be starting our work in this course the first day of class--don't miss it.]

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 6370-001 Topics in Literature and Environment: Ocean

        Despite the fact that oceans are not only the largest but also some of the most imperiled environments on the planet, the ocean has generally been neglected by environmental movements, environmental theorists, and scholars of animal studies. While there are a great many works of literature about the ocean, it is crucial to study visual representations of marine environments and sea creatures since visual media have had a powerful impact on how we understand the ocean. This course will introduce the literature, film, and scholarship about the ocean, asking how the focus on blue, rather than green, shifts predominant approaches in environmental criticism, environmental theory, and animal studies. We will read fiction, science fiction, poetry, theory, history, and nonfiction environmental writing, including works by Jules Verne, Rachel Carson, Sylvia Earle, Samuel Coleridge, Herman Melville, Linda Hogan, Joan Slonczewski, Stefan Helmreich, and others. We will discuss several films, including Jaws, Sharkwater, The Cove, Whale Rider, the films of Jean Painleve, and excerpts from Blue Planet. We will also look at the visual media included on scientific and activist web sites, some of the early drawings of ocean creatures by Haeckel and Agassiz, and recent “coffee table†photography books, as we analyze the meaning and implications of marine aesthetics. [No previous knowledge of oceans or environmental criticism is required, but students should have already taken English 5300 or its equivalent.]

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3347-001 Environmental Justice

        English 3347-001: Multicultural U.S. Literature: The Literature and Film of Environmental Justice This advanced English course, which fulfills the “diversity†requirement for English majors, explores the literature and film of environmental justice. Environmental justice as a social movement focuses on the unequal distribution of environmental harms vs. environmental benefits—especially those distributions shaped by race and class. We’ll discuss novels, autobiographies, poetry, a few films, websites, and one work of nonfiction. The course features works by African-Americans, Native Americans, Mexican-Americans, and Euro-Americans. The topics include the relation between land and culture, land rights, toxic neighborhoods and workplaces, mountaintop removal, Hurricane Katrina, and climate change. Requirements: participation, presentations, short essay, midterm exam, final exam and a final project, which may be either a research paper or a multimedia project. Readings: Louise Erdrich, Tracks; Ana Castillo, So Far from God; Devon G. Pena, Mexican Americans and the Environment: Tierra Y Vida; Suzanne Antonetta, Body Toxic; Percival Everett, Watershed; Percival Everett, Wounded; Ann Pancake, Strange as this Weather Has Been; Mark Lynas, High Tide: The Truth About Climate Change; Timothy Corrigan, A Short Guide to Writing about Film (any edition!) Films will include Thunderheart, Trouble the Water, and Texas Gold. Feel free to email Dr. Alaimo: alaimo@uta.edu if you have any topics, authors, texts, or films you would like to see included in this class.

        Please download the syllabus for more information. STUDENTS: PLEASE CHECK YOUR OFFICIAL UTA EMAIL. I WILL SEND YOU AN EMAIL GIVING YOU THE ADDRESS FOR THE MAVSPACE FOLDER FOR OUR CLASS. THE SYLLABUS, PAPER ASSIGNMENTS, AND ADDITIONAL READINGS WILL BE AVAILABLE FROM THAT FOLDER ONLY.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 American Literature: Environmental Literature and Film

        This class will focus on how recent books and films portray current environmental crises. We will focus on four major issues: toxins, climate change, extinction and biodiversity, and the state of the oceans. We will explore how the literature, nonfiction, film, photography, and web sites portray these issues, examining how they incorporate scientific facts and frameworks, how they make different kinds of appeals to their audiences, and how they attempt to effect change. The literature includes novels, autobiographies, science writing, poetry, and science fiction. The films will include Everything’s Cool: A Toxic Comedy about Global Warming, Texas Gold; Being Caribou, and Sharkwater.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4350-001 Film and Literature: Nature, Environment, and Animals in Film and Theory

        This course will examine a wide range of films and introduce significant ideas, concepts, and questions within ecocriticism, green cultural studies, environmental studies, and animal studies. We will analyze the following films: Deliverance, Brokeback Mountain, Thunderheart, Congo, The Birds, Twelve Monkeys, Winged Migration, The Lion King, Princess Mononoke, Silkwood, Safe, The Lion King, Everything’s Cool, Being Caribou, Grizzly Man, Sharkwater, and Tree-Sit the Art of Resistance. We will discuss the environmental, ethical, political, and philosophical ramifications of the way these films represent nature, animals, and humans. Along with watching the films, we will read theory, criticism, and cultural studies. Although I will present several short lectures, the course emphasizes student participation and independent thought. Class time will consist of lecture, discussion, presentations, and small group work. Requirements will include daily class participation, presentations, one final project, a mid-term exam, and a final exam.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-001 Senior Seminar Modern American Poetry

        English 4399: SENIOR SEMINAR is a capstone course for English majors. It is a writing-intensive, seminar-style, in-depth study of a topic. The Prerequisites for this course are: ENGL 2350 and completion of 18 hours of required 3000 - 4000 level English courses. Because this is a capstone course the emphasis will be on independent research, thinking, writing, and learning, as well as on intense in-class discussions. Attending the Hermanns lectures will also be part of the capstone experience. The topic of this particular section of the Senior Seminar is Modern American Poetry. We will discuss an exciting and diverse range of 20th-Century American poetry, including the following topics: American visions, the literary movements of modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, and postmodernism, labor poetry and other activist poetry, animal and nature poetry, war poetry, experimental poetry, poetry about identity politics, poetry about love, sex, and desire, and other topics. We will examine poetry as an art form as well as discuss its cultural and political contexts and roles. Students may do their final projects on a 20th century American poet of their choice, and will have the option of working with music lyrics or performance poetry. We will take advantage of the extraordinarily rich and informative web site that accompanies the Modern American Poetry anthology.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2009 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2013
    • Teaching Awards
      • Nov 2013 Teaching Awards at UTA

        University of Texas at Arlington, Teaching

        Awards:

        Excellence in Doctoral Student Mentoring Award, 2016

        The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, Inducted  Spring 2013 (for Piper Nomination)

        UTA Nominee for the statewide Piper Award, 2012

        The University of Texas System Board of Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award, 2011

        Distinguished Teaching Professor, Academy of Distinguished Teachers, 2010

        Alicia Wilkerman Smotherman Faculty Award, 2009

        Freshman Leaders on Campus Faculty Appreciation Recognition, 2009

        “Recognized Professor,” The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, 2009

        Inaugural Recipient of the Chancellor’s Council Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching, 2008

Service to the Community

  • Elected
    • June 2002 to  Present Service: COMMUNITY

      Advisory Board. Prairie Science Academy, 2013--.

      Dallas SPCA: Animal Handler, TLC, Summer 2009-

      Design Committee Co-Chair, Twelve Hills Nature Center, Fall 2004-Fall 2006.

      Board of Directors and Advisory Board Member, Twelve Hills Nature Center, 2004-2008.

      Science and Nature project volunteer, The Kessler School, 2004-2005.

      Garden Volunteer, Harry Stone Montessori, 2002-2003.

Service to the Profession

  • Elected
    • June 2013 to  Present Academic Service: PROFESSION

      MLA Forum, Ecocriticism and Environmental Humanities, Inaugural Committee, 2014-2016,   Chair, 2015.

      Interviewed for MLA newsletter about the field of Ecocriticism and the Environmental Humanities, January 2015, with Jeffery J. Cohen, Sharon O’Daire, and Stephanie LeMenager.

      MLA Division on Literature and Science, 2010--2015.  Elected.

      ASLE (Association for the Study of Literature and Environment) Book Awards Judging, Spring 2013.

      ASLE  Official Liaison for the SLSA (Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts) Association,  2004-2009.

      ASLE Graduate Student Mentor, 2004-2008.

      Essay Awards Committee for the SLSA (Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts), Fall 2007.

      Graduate Student Paper Awards Committee, SSAWW, Fall 2003

      Selection committee for the SSAWW conference, Spring 2003 , Fort Worth TX.

      Selection committee for GEMCS, Group for Early Modern Cultural Studies, Dallas,1995.

Service to the University

  • Elected
    • June 1994 to  Present Academic Service: COLLEGE AND UNIVERISTY

      University

      Notable Achievements in Service and Administration:

      Coordinator of the cross-disciplinary Environmental and Sustainability Studies Minor, 2011-present. [Locate and evaluate courses from across the entire university for the cross-disciplinary minor.  Make policies for the minor, in consultation with the CRCE. Encourage faculty to promote the minor. Arrange the core course.  Coordinate funding.  Communicate with students, the advisor, and the web master. Maintain separate web pages and FB group. Develop plans, procedures, and protocols.  Without a course release or a stipend.]

      Developed a cross-disciplinary Environmental and Sustainability Studies Minor with James Grover (Biology) and Jeff Howard (Urban Affairs) (2009-2010).

      Academic Co-chair, President’s Sustainability Committee, Spring 2009--2011. Appointed. [Serving directly under John Hall, the VP of Administration and Campus Operations, and with the staff co-chair from Facilities, I developed, coordinated, and promoted the entire University Sustainability committee, which oversees everything from landscaping and dining services to student and academic issues.]

      Wrote White Paper on Sustainability, with Jim Grover (Biology), Chris Morris (History), and Jeff Howard (SUPA), 2008.

      Miscellaneous University Service

      Hearing Panel, 2015-2016

      Faculty Steering Committee, Institute for Global Sustainability, Spring 2015—

      Ad hoc committee to propose a Center for Sustainability at UTA. 2013—present.

      Academy of Distinguished Teachers’ Leadership Committee, 2010-2016 [evaluate teaching award applications, meet and advise on other pedagogical issues].

      University Hearing Panel, 2012-2014.

      Curriculum, Research, and Community Engagement Work Group, of the President’s Sustainability Committee, 2007-present.

      Evaluated Faculty Travel Grants for the CRCE, Sustainability, Fall 2013.

      Evaluated Faculty Fellowships for the CRCE, Spring 2013.

      University Sustainability Committee, 2007-2012.

      Organizer of two “Sustainability Across the Curriculum” symposia, 2009-2011.

      Bike Committee member, University Sustainability Committee, 2011—

      Tree Campus Committee member, University Sustainability Committee, 2011—

      Search Committee, Sustainability Director, President’s Sustainability Committee, Fall 2009.

      Faculty Mentor, Fall 2004-Spring 2005; Fall 2010--Spring 2011.

      ACES abstract reviewer, Spring 2011, Spring 2012; Spring 2013.

      Committee on the Status of Women and Minorities, 2001-2002.

      Search committee, Director of CMAS (Center for Mexican American Studies),1998-99.

      Honors Program Advisory Council, 1995-1996, 1999-2001.

    • June 1994 to  Present Academic Service: DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH

      Department

      Co-Chair, Latino/a Studies Search Committee, 2014-2015.

      Ad Hoc Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, 2014—2015

      Tenure and Promotion, 2000-2002, 2004-2006, 2007-2009; 2014--

      Full-Time Adjuncts Committee, 2013--

      Graduate Program Writing Sample Committee, 2012-2013

      Research Committee, 2008--present

      Chair, Annual Evaluation Committee, 2011-2012.

      Organized Posthumanities and Science Studies faculty/doctoral student workshop, Spring 2013.

      Ad Hoc Committee to restructure the major, Fall 2010-Fall 2012.

      Co-Chair, Hermanns Lecture Committee, 2011-12, “Animals.”

      Ad Hoc committee to construct faculty evaluation rubric, 2011.

      Ad Hoc committee on teaching loads, Fall 2011.

      Greening the English Department, Ad Hoc Committee, 2010.

      Chair, Tenure and Promotion committee, 2008-2009.

      Chair, Hermanns Lecture Committee, 2008-2009. “Greening English.”

      Chair, Latino/a Studies Search Committee, 2007-2008.

      Chair, Target of Opportunity Search Committee, 2006-2007.

      Chair, Committee on Graduate Studies, 2000-2004.

      Chair, Research Committee, 2000-2003.

      Chair, Early American Literature Search Committee, 2002-2003.

      Chair, Travel Committee, 2001-2004.

      Chair, Recruitment and Retention, Fall 1998.

      Departmental mentor for new faculty member, 2006-2007.

      Teaching mentor for graduate student, 2005.

      Advisory/Evaluation Committee, 2006-2008, 2002-2004, 1998-2000.

      Travel Funds, 1999-2000; 2012-

      Awards, 1999-2000.

      Service learning ad hoc committee, 1999-2000.

      Search committee for Early American Literature,1997-1998.

      Search committee for Mexican-American Literature, 2000-2001.

      Associate Chair for Graduate Studies, 2001-2004. 

      Responsibilities: chair the Graduate Studies Committee; organize graduate curriculum; formulate policy and procedures; revise graduate catalog; revise materials about the graduate program;  organize workshops on conferences, publishing, and the academic job market; coach graduate students for the national job market; oversee the dossier service; reorganize the graduate web page; coordinate and speak at Graduate Forums;  disseminate information regarding policies, procedures, resources, and opportunities; answer specific questions of approximately 80 prospective students each year; make admissions and fellowship decisions, for fall, spring, and summer; personally advise approximately 35 MA students and 45 PhD students each semester; act as an advocate for graduate students and graduate teaching assistants.   Specific accomplishments:  established a dossier service; established files of professional information; wrote proposal for a one-track PhD in literature and rhetoric; improved the professional training of graduate students; initiated a graduate student orientation. 

      Acting Chair, Department of English, Summer I 2002, Summer I and August 2003.

Other Service Activities

  • Uncategorized
    • Dec  Academic Co-Chair of University Sustainability Committee, 2009-2011.
    • Dec  Coordinator of the Environmental and Sustainability Studies Minor, Fall 2011-
    • Dec  Elected to serve on the MLA Division on Literature and Science, 2010-2015.
    • Dec  Invited Scholar, Quadrant Project. University of Minnesota Press, U of MN Institute for Advanced Study, Fall, 2009.
    • Dec  Leader and organizer of Special Seminar on Ecocriticism and Science Studies, ASLE (Association for the Study of Literature and Environment)” conference, June 2007.
    • Dec  External Examiner, PhD Committee, University of New South Wales, 2010
    • Dec  External Examiner, PhD Committee, University of Illinois, 2010
    • Dec  Organizer. "Sustainability Across the Curriculum" ACES Symposiums, Spring 2010, Spring 2011
      http://www.uta.edu/english/alaimo/pdfs/ACES%20PSC%20.pdf
    • Dec  Scientific Advisory Board, “Living and Learning in a Changing Climate, grant.
      Dr. Eva Lövbrand, principal investigator, Linköping University, Sweden.

Administrative Appointment

  • 2015
    • June 2015 to Present - Director of the Environmental and Sustainability Studies Minor, College of Architecture, Planning and Public Affairs
  • 2011
    • Aug 2011 to June 2015 - Coordinator, Environmental and Sustainability Studies Minor, SUPA
  • 2009
    • Jan 2009 to June 2011 - Academic Co-Chair, President’s Sustainability Committee, Spring 2009--2011., University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   VP Administration and Campus Operations
  • 2001
    • Aug 2001 to June 2004 - Associate Chair for Graduate Studies, English Department, 2001-2004, University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts
    • June 2001 to Aug 2003 - Acting Chair, English Department, Summer I 2002, Summer I 2003 and August 2003, University of Texas at Arlington   Office of the President   Office of the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs   College of Liberal Arts