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Dr. Stephanie Tavera

Name

[Tavera, Dr. Stephanie]
  • Lecturer

Biography

Dr. Stephanie Peebles Tavera is a Lecturer at the University of Texas of Arlington.  She teaches American literature, womens and gender studies, freshman and sophomore Composition and Rhetoric, and Engineering Communcations courses for the Department of English and the Womens and Gender Studies Program. Her current book project, Un(dis)covered Bodies: Science, Narrative, and the Female Body in Activist Medical Fiction, offers a feminist body theory approach to women’s medical fiction during the Comstock Law period (circa 1874-1916). Dr. Tavera has published articles in Science Fiction Studies and Utopian Studies academic journals, and is currently editing, writing the introduction for, and contributing a chapter to an edition collection with Robert LaRue for Palgrave MacMillan press. The edited collection is tentatively titled, Theorizing Bodies: Language, Materiality, Subjectivity, and it focuses on the tension between linguistic and material constructions of the body in postmodern theory. 

Professional Preparation

    • 2017 Doctor of Philosophy in English and American Literature (Women's and Gender Studies Graduate Certificate),  University of Texas at Arlington
    • 2011 Master of Arts in Humanities in Literature (Spanish),  University of Texas at Dallas
    • 2009 Bachelor of Arts in Literature (Spanish),  University of Texas at Dallas

Appointments

    • May 2017 to Present Adjunct Assistant Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug 2013 to May 2017 Enhanced Graduate Teaching Assistant
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • June 2016 to Aug 2016 Graduate Research Assistant
      University of Texas at Arlington   Women's and Gender Studies Program
    • May 2014 to June 2016 Writing Center Digital Media Consultant
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2012 to July 2013 Writing Center Tutor
      Collin County Community College McKinney & Plano, Texas
    • Oct 2011 to July 2013 Adjunct Professor of English
      Tarrant County College District
    • Aug 2011 to July 2013 Associate Professor of English
      Collin County Community College McKinney & Plano, Texas

Memberships

  • Membership
    • Aug 2018 to Present South Central Modern Language Assocation
    • Jan 2018 to Present C19: The Society of Nineteenth-Century Americanists
    • Aug 2016 to Present SSAWW: Society for the Study of American Women Writers
    • Aug 2016 to Present Modern Language Association (MLA)
    • June 2014 to Present Society for Utopian Studies
    • June 2014 to Present South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA)
    • Apr 2014 to Present Society for Literature, Science, and the Arts
  • Membership
    • Aug 2015 to Present American Literature Association

Awards and Honors

    • Apr  2016 Who's Who Among Students in American Colleges & Universities sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Apr  2016 College of Liberal Arts Scholar Award sponsored by College of Liberal Arts, University of Texas at Arlington
    • Dec  2015 Phi Kappa Phi, Charter Member sponsored by Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society (PKP)
    • Aug  2013 Graduate Tuition Fellowship (Enhanced Graduate Teaching Assistantship) sponsored by University of Texas at Arlington
    • Aug  2013 Carrizo Oil & Gas, Inc. Graduate Research Fellowship sponsored by Carrizo Oil & Gas
    • May  2011 Master of Arts Defense, Passed with Distinction sponsored by University of Texas at Dallas
    • May  2009 Spanish Language Proficiency Exam sponsored by University of Texas at Dallas
    • Jan  2009 Fast Track Undergraduate Award sponsored by University of Texas at Dallas

Research and Expertise

  • Late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century American literature; Women's and Gender Studies; feminist theory; sexuality studies; utopian studies; ecocriticism and environmental theory; disability studies

    I am currently writing my first book project, titled Un(dis)covered Bodies: Science, Narrative, and the Female Body in Activist Medical Fiction, which is under review at several presses including University of Pennsylvania Press. In Un(dis)covered Bodies, I argue that women writers of medical fiction resisted censorship of social hygiene–or sex education–under federal Comstock Law by rescripting “scientific” narratives that designate the female body as disabled. From Louisa May Alcott’s Eight Cousins (1874) to Angelina Weld Grimke’s Rachel: A Play in Three Acts (1916), I examine several works of woman-authored medical fiction through a feminist body theory lens as a way of revealing how women writers of medical fiction distanced themselves from the concept of disability by redefining the female body in terms of race and impairment. Using theorists such as Judith Butler, Anne Fausto-Sterling, and Rosemarie Garland-Thompson, I discuss how white women writers distanced the (white) female body from disability by redefining “disability” as intellectual impairment and blackness, while women-of-color writers distanced the (black) female body from disability by appealing to able-bodiedness and the moral values of their white female counterparts. I find race at the center of the conversation concerning the female body because both the concept of disability and the female body are pathologized as impaired based upon socially-constructed definitions of race and sex in nineteenth-century professional medicine, a field which explicitly sought to exclude women writers from engagement through censorship.

    I have previously published articles on eugenic birth control in Gilman's Herland, new materialism in Whitman's Leaves of Grass, and the (posthumanist) cyborg corporation in utopian tradition and science fiction. I am currently working on several projects including my book project, Un(dis)covered Bodies; an edited collection, entitled Theorizing Bodies, with colleague Robert LaRue; an article on teaching sex education issues from young adult fiction in the undergraduate classroom; and also revising an article that I am revising and resubmitting on posthumanism, metaphor, and anthropomorphism in Emily Dickinson's sexual poetics. Finally, I have a forthcoming HC Press critical edition of Annie Nathan Meyers Helen Brent, M.D. (1892), for which I wrote the introduction and edited the critical appendix. 

Publications

      Book Chapter Accepted
      • “Cruxing Syphilis: Sex, Disability, and Eugenics in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Crux.” Theorizing Bodies: Language, Materiality, Subjectivity. Eds. Robert LaRue and Stephanie Peebles Tavera. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019. Forthcoming.

        {Book Chapter }

      Book Accepted
      • Editor with an Introduction.  Helen Brent, M.D. By Annie Nathan Meyer.  Hastings, NE: Hastings College Press, 2018.  Print.

        {Book }
      In-progress
      • Theorizing Bodies: Language, Materiality, Subjectivity. Eds. Robert LaRue and Stephanie Peebles Tavera. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018.

        {Book }
      In-progress
      • Un(dis)covered Bodies: Science, Narrative, and the Female Body in Activist Medical Fiction. Monograph Proposal under Initial Review, University of Pennsylvania Press and Rutgers University Press. Submitted Aug 2018.  

        {Book }

      Journal Article 2018
      • "Her Body, Herland​: Reproductive Health and Dis/topian Satire in Charlotte Perkins Gilman." Utopian Studies ​29.1 (2018): 1-20.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2017
      • “Utopia, Inc.: A Manifesto for the Cyborg Corporation.”  Science Fiction Studies 44.1 (2017).

        {Peer Reviewed }

      Book Chapter 2015
      • "Always Already Sexual: New Materialism in Whitman's Leaves of Grass."  Writing the Environment in Nineteenth Century American Literature: The Ecological Awareness of Early Scribes of Nature.  Ed. Steven Petersheim and Malcolm Jones IV. Lanham, MD: Rowman and LIttlefield, 2015.  99-115.     

        {Book Chapter }

Presentations

    • November  2018
      Rachel, Chaste: Performing Con(tra)ception in Angelina Weld Grimke’s Rachel: A Play in Three Acts
      In this paper, I explore how Angelina Weld Grimke’s “Rachel: A Play in Three Acts” rescripts the politics of the early birth control movement as an issue primarily affecting the black female body. In my book project, Un(dis)covered Bodies: Science, Narrative, and the Female Body in Feminist Medical Fiction, I postulate reproductive rights as a feminist issue that begins with Mary Gove Nichols’ and Paulina Wright Davis’s early anatomy lectures, since Nichols and Davis used social hygiene education–or what we call today, “sex education”–as a feminist platform for arguing that the systematic raping of slave women’s bodies served as evidence for the necessity of reproductive rights among women. If we read texts such as Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1861), Frances Harper’s Iola Leroy (1892), Grimke’s “Rachel” (1916), and Octavia Butler’s Kindred (1979) as forwarding Nichols’ and Davis’s call for reproductive rights among women, then we may recognize an alternative historical trajectory that not only begins with women-of-color as its subject, but also is advanced by women-of-color writers, interlocutors, and activists. Grimke’s “Rachel” shifts the conversation surrounding reproductive rights for women from the right to birth control toward the right to motherhood in a manner that not only refers back to sexual violence during slavery but also prefigures feminist arguments against the forced sterilization of women-of-color during the 1980s and 1990s Reproductive Justice Movement. Since Grimke wrote “Rachel” in 1914-1915, and it was first performed Washington, D.C. on March 3, 1916, at the height of Margaret Sanger’s birth control campaign, we might then read Grimke as performing body autonomy and reproductive rights in direct response to white women writers and activists of the birth control movement including, but not limited to, Margaret Sanger and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.
    • October  2018
      Not Just a Book About Teen Sex: Teaching Blume’s Forever in the Undergraduate Classroom
      In this paper, I explore how young adult fiction such as Judy Blume’s Forever (1975) offers a space for discussing sex education and reproductive health issues in the undergraduate classroom, given that many secondary education classrooms fail to provide a much-needed space for exploring difficult and controversial topics without stigmatizing or shaming students. In Spring 2018, I taught Judy Blume’s Forever in my sophomore literature course, entitled “Textual Contraception.” Using the Literary Observation Grid activity as a way for students to reflect on the text, I productively opened up a space for discussing difficult subjects relating to twenty-first century reproductive health subjects. My students were surprisingly forthcoming in their reflections and class discussion about consent issues, first sexual experiences, and the practice of “coming out” as a result of reading Blume’s young adult novel. In this paper, I consider how the genre of young adult fiction facilitated such responses, since my students are themselves young adults between the ages of 18 to 21, and may have seen themselves as the primary audience for this text.
    • March  2018
      “A ‘Rose’ By Any Other Name: Defining ‘Environment,’ ‘Disability,’ and the Female Body in Alcott’s Eight Cousins”
      In this paper, I discuss Louisa May Alcott’s Eight Cousins as a form of domestic sex education that responds to late nineteenth-century public discourses concerning definitions of the female body. Like feminist advice literature such as Howe’s Sex and Education (1874), Alcott’s novel Eight Cousins (1874) directly responds to Edward Clarke’s treatise, which stated that a woman--and her social role--was defined her sexual organs. Yet, Alcott offers a variation on disability and the female body: Through her young adult protagonist Rose Campbell, Alcott reveals that the female body is as much influenced by its external physical and social environment as by her own internal anatomical, physiological, and mental functions. Alcott’s premise, I conclude, prefigures contemporary feminist body theorists such as Judith Butler, Anne Fausto-Sterling, and Elizabeth Grosz, each of whom draw upon the Mobius Strip as a means of complicating biologically-determinist definitions of the body by collapsing internal/external dualisms.  
    • November  2017
      Theorizing Her-Story: Dis/ability and the Female Body in Feminist Medical Fiction
      Invited Talk for the Center for Theory Colloquium. In this talk, I discuss how women writers of medical fiction--especially Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Louisa May Alcott--re-scripted definitions of the medicalized female body, and told "her-story" about how and why the body functions as a woman. Using the Mobius Strip apparatus from feminist theorists such as Judith Butler, Anne Fausto-Sterling, and Elizabeth Grosz, I explain how women writers of medical fiction open up a space for imaging the female body as flexible, varied, and not inherently disabled by her reproductive organs. I conclude by problematizing "her-story" of the female body in woman-authored medical fiction as a way of revealing how twenty-first century American culture has inherited disability rhetoric from these women writers in various discourses including advertising, politics, and professional gynecology. I further suggest how the Mobius Strip might help us redefine "disability" and reimagine the female body as flexible and varied.   
    • April  2017
      Cock-High in the World: Sexuality from a Dismodern Feminist Perspective
      In this paper, I argue for a dismodernist feminist approach to sex education by reading Nancy Mairs’ memoir, Waist-High in the World: A Life Among the Nondisabled (1996), alongside feminist disability theory and environmental theory. Building upon Lennard J. Davis’s “dismodernism” and Rosemarie Garland-Thompson’s feminist disability theory, my concept of “dismodern feminism” finds a more inclusive approach to sex education requires theorists and educators design curricula with disability studies at the center. Such a move not only relates to dis/ability, but also considers how various raced, gendered, sexed, and classed bodies express sexuality.
    • April  2017
      (Dis)Abling Sex Education in Gilman's Herland
      Sex education at the fin de siecle often drew upon biological texts rather than anatomical or medical texts. This “scientific” approach to sex education emphasized natural processes such as reproduction in its fundamental comparison of nonhuman biology and human anatomy. Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s feminist utopian satire Herland (1915) offers insight into sex education debates during this period and reveals the ways in which the field of biology was mined for sex education. Herland further reveals how sex construction is implicated in such a “scientific” approach. I argue that Gilman’s satire extends beyond traditional scholarly readings of Herlandian gender roles, since biological sex and “scientific” sex education are also parodied in Gilman’s entomological and botanical representation of reproduction and sex education. Herland is not an escapist project--it is a rescapist project-- in which Gilman revises contemporary sex education theories in her efforts at challenging biologically-determinist definitions of "sex" and "gender."
    • January  2017
      Resisting the “Conspiracy of Silence”: Charlotte Perkins Gilman and the Women’s Health Movement.

      As early as 1898, Charlotte Perkins Gilman adopted a feminist approach toward reproductive health in her short story, "The Yellow Wallpaper," which offered her infamous exposé on Dr. S. Weir Mitchell’s “Rest Cure."  Yet, Gilman's femininst approach toward reproductive health appears throughout her body of work, much of which remains unknown and understudied.  In this presentation, I discuss Gilman's medical fiction as contributing to a fictionalized alternative women's rights movement focused on reproductive justice, particularly during the Comstock Law Era in which "obscene" language was "on lockdown."  Several works by Gilman seek to break the “conspiracy of silence” enshrouding women’s reproductive health including The Crux (1911), "The Vintage" (1915), and "Joan's Defender" (1916).  In her attempts at providing her readership a sex education, Gilman drew upon rhetoric from contemporaneous social reform movements including, but not limited to, the dress reform, social purity, voluntary motherhood, birth control, and eugenics movements, all of which had implications for sex, gender, race, and class constructions at the fin de siècle.

    • May  2016
      Body Politics: Women’s Medical Fiction in/as Feminist Reproductive Health Reform, 1873-1915

      Dissertation-in-progress panel: This talk will present on a small contingency of women writers that I argue developed a new genre of fiction and literary movement, feminist reproductive health reform, in an effort to challenge mainstream assumptions and practices towards women's health and the emerging field of gynecology.  These women included such canonical authors as Louisa May Alcott, Sarah Orne Jewett, Rebecca Harding Davis, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman, as well as a lesser known author I seek recovering, Annie Nathan Meyer.  In writing these works of fiction, each woman presents a didactic argument for medical reform that often intersects with - if not spearheads - a contemporaneous social reform movement including, but not limited to, dress reform, social purity, voluntary motherhood, and the birth control movement.

    • April  2016
      Conspiracies of Silence: Sexing the Body in Nineteenth Century Women’s Medical Fiction
      Graduate keynote for Womens History Month at the University of Texas at Arlington.
    • November  2015
      Gyn/outopia: Gynecology, Eugenics, and the Birth Control Movement in Gilman’s Herland

      In this paper, I will discuss Herland within Gilman’s larger body of work, particularly alongside her medical fiction, in an effort to represent Gilman’s use of parthenogenesis as a feminist means of achieving her utopian ideal, yet simultaneously embodying the tensions between “regular” and “irregular” practitioners in the emerging field of gynecology.  In particular, I find parthenogenesis serves two functions: as a form of birth control and a form of fertilization, prefiguring technological methods of contraception and in-vitro fertilization.  Gilman’s body of work, including Herland, appeared during a time in which medical scientists were experimenting in women’s reproductive health, and her use of parthenogenesis reveals the tensions and implications resulting from professionalization.

    • October  2015
      The Parthenogenic Divide: Reproductive Technologies in Gilman’s Herland and Lane’s Mizora

      In this paper, I extend scholars’ comparison between Gilman and Lane by arguing that Gilman’s Herland uses parthenogenesis for her defense of “natural” birth control ala voluntary motherhood, whereas Lane’s Mizora uses parthenogenesis for artificial purposes in proposing artificial insemination – and by extension – “artificial” birth control – as a means of reproductive intervention and control.  Gilman and Lane’s approach toward women’s reproductive health mirrors a greater societal tension among nineteenth century medical professionals and social reformers concerning technological advancements and the emerging field of gynecology.  The core of these tensions revolved around the natural/artificial divide, represented in Lane and Gilman’s utopian fiction as the “parthenogenic divide,” since “natural” contraception and “artificial” birth control caused concern for medical professionals and social reformers alike in terms of how much control a woman should be given over her own reproductive functions

    • September  2015
      Syphilitics and the City: Gynecology and Urban Society in Annie Nathan Meyer’s Helen Brent, M.D.

      In the late nineteenth century, a number of New York’s leading physicians and gynecologists believed that urban living, and particularly the middle-to-upper class urban lifestyle, inflamed a young girl’s passions, causing early menstruation and heightened sexual energies.  In her now-obscure novel, Helen Brent, M.D. (1892), Annie Nathan Meyer observes a similar influence on women’s reproductive health caused by urban social conditions, yet her novel also challenges other commonly held assumptions among patriarchal medical practitioners such as the belief that education drained a woman’s sexual and reproductive energies, preventing conception, or that women were the source of venereal disease (see Spongeberg).  In this paper, I will present Annie Nathan Meyer’s Helen Brent, M.D. (1892) as engaging in nineteenth century medical discourse on women’s reproductive health in an effort to expose the contradictions inherent in patriarchal medical practice, especially in the field of gynecology.  Through her character Helen Brent, Meyer reveals nineteenth century medical science as primarily a social science that defined the New York “woman” and “womanhood” based on her urban social environment and her role therein.

    • April  2015
      "Kochininako and the Goddess: Revitilizing Ecofeminism with Yellow Woman Myth"

      In this paper, I address mainstream feminists’ concerns that violence in the abduction narratives of Keresan Yellow Woman mythology promote women’s oppression under male domination, particularly in light of Paul Gunn Allen’s tribal feminist critique.  However, instead of a tribal feminist approach, I offer Yellow Woman an ecofeminist approach that recognizes the violence in Yellow Woman abduction narratives emerge in representing Yellow Woman’s connection with nature, and especially, the fact the earth’s natural processes often involve violence against herself and other material bodies including humans and nonhuman animals.  In addition, an ecofeminist reading of Yellow Woman provides ecofeminists another means of reconceptualizing the “woman-nature connection” and “goddess” mythology which has recently experienced critique from mainstream feminists.  Yellow Woman mythology, and especially Leslie Marmon Silko’s “Yellow Woman,” represent ecofeminist premises without “essentialist” underpinnings since Yellow Woman, though female, seeks balancing all material bodies in nature regardless of race, class, gender, sexuality, or species.      

    • November  2014

      "Always [Already] Sex(ual)": New Materialism in Whitman's "Song of Myself" 

      In this paper, I offer a new materialist and posthumanist reading of Whitman’s Leaves of Grass that suggests sexual bodies and sexual “intra-action” disclose Whitman’s biopolitics.  In particular, I suggest that sexual bodies in Whitman’s “Song of Myself” not only challenge male and female normative behaviors but also human and nonhuman relationships in the reciprocal sexual encounters between humans, animals, and the environment and that this reciprocal relationship might offer new materialists another means of understanding the human’s relationship with the material world – through “consummation,” or an intimacy between material bodies that involves coming together in a manner that de-centers the human in the material world. 

    • October  2014
      In Defense of the Compound: (Cy)Borg Capitalism in Dystopian Science Fiction

      In this paper, I further Elaine Smitha's assessment of the corporation as a "living person," and therefore, responsible for its interactions with the material world, and argue that dystopian science fiction offers both the corporation and the consumer an opportunity for recognizing the corporation as a material body in the Anthropocene.  More specifically, I read dystopian science fiction – including Atwood’s Oryx and Crake, Bacigalupi’s The Windup Girl, Robinson’s The Gold Coast, and Winterson's The Stone Gods –, through the lens of cyborg theory and suggest a reassessment of the corporation as a cybernetic organism including the human/animal hybrid, human/plant hybrid, and human/machine hybrid.  In both the corporation’s and the consumer’s recognition of capitalism as a cyborg and a material body, ecocritics are more equipped for developing an economic ethics for the Anthropocene.

    • October  2014
      MORE Accepts Responsibility: (Cy)Borg Capitalism in Dystopian Science Fiction

      In postulating my theory of cyborg capitalism, I argue for a rereading of the 1886 U.S. Supreme Court decision legally designating corporations as a “living person” and, in my argument, I offer a posthumanist reading of corporations in dystopian science fiction through Donna Haraway’s cyborg theory. In short, I argue that dystopian science fiction – including Bacigalupi’s The Windup Girl, Robinson’s The Gold Coast, and Winterson’s The Stone Gods – represents the corporate body, a “living person,” as an always already cyborgian material body that takes “pleasure in the confusion of boundaries,” yet fails in accepting “responsibility in their construction” (Haraway 2270). 

    • April  2014

      Ecotopia or Bust!: Building Utopia from the Ashes of Global Catastrophe in Robinson's Three Californias Trilogy

      This paper explores the use of the Anthropocene as a doomsday device in Robinson's Three Californias Trilogy as well as the implications of doomsday as a means of enciting change within the global community.  More specifically, Robinson's use of utopian and dystopian elements in his trilogy not only critiques consumer capitalism and technology, but offers suggestions for building a more eco-friendly society, or ecotopia, that balances science (especially, technology) and utopia.

    • March  2014
      Children of Utopia: Methods of Behavioral Engineering in Lowry's The Giver and Skinner's Walden Two

      This paper will be given at the University of North Georgia's Arts and Letters Conference on Utopia in the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences in Dahlonega, GA on Feb 28-Mar 2.  The paper explores the implications of B. F. Skinner’s carefully controlled environment as outlined in Walden Two, and in particular, the effects of behavioral determinism on the maturity of children and adolescents; further, I compare Skinner's utopian version of behavioral engineering to the dystopian verision presented in Lowry's The Giver.  Ultimately, I argue that although Lowry presents a dystopian version of behavioral engineering, her novel suggests the importance of behavior modification in shaping children's successful development into adulthood. 

Projects

  • 2014
    • Dec 2014 to June 2016 Write On: The English Writing Center

      Supervisor and Co-developer for the UTA Writing Center website: http://www.uta.edu/owl 

      Role: Other PI: Tra Clough

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • Jan 2018 to Present Faculty Fellow Program sponsored by  - $1200
    • Sept 2013 to May 2017 Graduate Tuition Fellowship (Enhanced Graduate Teaching Assistant) sponsored by  - $30000
    • Sept 2013 to May 2015 Carrizo Oil & Gas Fellowship sponsored by  - $4000
    • Jan 2017 to Jan 2017 COLA Dean's Office Conference Travel Support and English Department Matching Fund sponsored by  - $600
    • Mar 2016 to Mar 2016 Dissertation Research Travel Award sponsored by  - $500
    • Oct 2014 to Oct 2014 COLA Dean's Office Conference Travel Fund (International) sponsored by  - $500
    • Feb 2014 to Feb 2014 COLA Dean's Office Conference Travel Fund Support sponsored by  - $550

Other Research Activities

  • 2015
    • Interview
      • Oct 2015 Symposium to Explore Women's and Gender Studies

        Interview with Madelyn Edwards, Liberal Arts beat writer for The Shorthorn, on the Women's and Gender Studies symposium held Oct. 29, 2015.  I sat on the advisory board for the symposium and was instrumental in it's organization and planning.

      • Oct 2015 Teaching, Research Assistant Experience Adds Work Experience to Graduate School

        Interview with Kathryn Cargo, writer for The Shorthorn, on graduate school, my doctoral program experience, and my role as an Enhanced Graduate Teachiing Assistant.  Interview published in special issue on Guide to Graduate School for recruitment purposes.

Recordings

  • 2017
    • Apr 2017 Disabling Sex Education in Gilman's Herland

      This presentation was given for the Fifth Annual English Graduate Conference: “The (R)escape Artists: Negotiating Space and Place in Troubled Times" at University of Texas at Arlington, 7 April 2017. Video Credit, Michael Hale. The talk offers a condensed version of the research from my article, "Her Body, Herland: Reproductive Health and Dis/topian Satire in Charlotte Perkins Gilman," in Utopian Studies.

      [Refereed/Juried]

Students Supervised

  • Undergraduate
    • May 2018
      I served as faculty mentor/advisor for Ms. Lewis's Course-Contracted Honors Project for ENGL 2329: American Women’s Life-Writing: “Jenny Lawson’s Impact on Social Stigma through Relatability.” Spring 2018. I served as Mentor/Advisor.
    • Apr 2017
      Vanessa Velez. Senior Honors Thesis: “How Engineering Companies Approach Sex and Gender in Employee Manuals.” Spring 2017. Mentor/Thesis Advisor.

Peers Mentored

  • thumbnail
    Duration : Mar 2017 to Present
    I serve as a journal article reviewer for the academic journal, Criticism. 
  • thumbnail
    Duration : Mar 2018 to Mar 2018
    I served as a manuscript proposal reviewer for Hackett Publishing Company.

Courses

      • ENGL 1302-006 Composition and Rhetoric II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-019 Rhetoric and Composition II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-062 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-004 Performing Dis/ability (Studies in Disability and Literature)

        This sophomore-level course examines the social construction of disability and the representation of disabled bodies across multiple genres and periods of literature by American writers, as well as introduces students to some of the major concepts in disability studies. As an identity vector, disability is perhaps the most unstable form since it is an identity that everyone can embody during their lives, whether permanently or in episodic and fluctuating forms. Yet, as a subject, disability remains stigmatized based upon cultural ideals of beauty, performativity, and embodiment. This stigmatization leads to varying degrees of invisibility, oppression, or discrimination among persons with disabilities as our culture strives to normalize disabled subjects. By studying the representation of persons with disabilities in literature, this course seeks to explore, examine, and confront concepts and ways of adaptation, accessibility, and creativity among persons with disabilities as a means of moving toward greater inclusivity for all nonstandard bodies and subjects. Prerequisite: For ENGL 2303 students, the prerequisite is ENGL 1301. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • DS 2301-004 Performing Dis/ability (Studies in Disability and Literature)

        This sophomore-level course examines the social construction of disability and the representation of disabled bodies across multiple genres and periods of literature by American writers, as well as introduces students to some of the major concepts in disability studies. As an identity vector, disability is perhaps the most unstable form since it is an identity that everyone can embody during their lives, whether permanently or in episodic and fluctuating forms. Yet, as a subject, disability remains stigmatized based upon cultural ideals of beauty, performativity, and embodiment. This stigmatization leads to varying degrees of invisibility, oppression, or discrimination among persons with disabilities as our culture strives to normalize disabled subjects. By studying the representation of persons with disabilities in literature, this course seeks to explore, examine, and confront concepts and ways of adaptation, accessibility, and creativity among persons with disabilities as a means of moving toward greater inclusivity for all nonstandard bodies and subjects. Prerequisite: For ENGL 2303 students, the prerequisite is ENGL 1301. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-001 Performing Dis/ability (Studies in Disability and Literature)

        This sophomore-level course examines the social construction of disability and the representation of disabled bodies across multiple genres and periods of literature by American writers, as well as introduces students to some of the major concepts in disability studies. As an identity vector, disability is perhaps the most unstable form since it is an identity that everyone can embody during their lives, whether permanently or in episodic and fluctuating forms. Yet, as a subject, disability remains stigmatized based upon cultural ideals of beauty, performativity, and embodiment. This stigmatization leads to varying degrees of invisibility, oppression, or discrimination among persons with disabilities as our culture strives to normalize disabled subjects. By studying the representation of persons with disabilities in literature, this course seeks to explore, examine, and confront concepts and ways of adaptation, accessibility, and creativity among persons with disabilities as a means of moving toward greater inclusivity for all nonstandard bodies and subjects. Prerequisite: For ENGL 2303 students, the prerequisite is ENGL 1301. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2350-003 INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

        This course teaches current, declared English majors how to analyze literary texts using various methods of theoretical interpretation such as psychoanalysis, feminist theory, queer theory, postcolonial theory, ecocriticism, critical race studies, and disability theory. In exploring these theoretical approaches to reading, we will discuss several issues regarding the interpretation and the creation of meaning: What do we do when we read? How do we arrive at an interpretation of a text’s “meaning”? Can a text have more than one “meaning”? Why does interpretation matter? How do you translate an interpretive reading into a piece of analytic writing? In this course, we will examine these questions and issues related to them through an introduction to some of the key concepts in English studies.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-020 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-029 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-072 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-025 Argumentative Writing

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. This section is a special service learning section of ENGL 1302, focused on immigrant communities and immigration processing issues.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2310-001 INTRO TO WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

        This course introduces students to the ways of seeing, thinking, and knowing that characterize the fields of Women’s and Gender Studies. The basic goal of the course is to foster a greater understanding of four key concepts: (1) the social construction of gender, (2) intersectionality, (3) privilege and oppression, and (4) feminist praxis. In an effort to thoroughly explore these threshold concepts, we will apply them within a variety of contexts including, but not limited to, media representation and reproductive health as a way of discussing contemporary social issues affecting women. Significantly, this course emphasizes how a feminist critical approach not only equips us to understand the complex role of gender in modern society, but also raises questions about the connection between regional and national issues and our individual experiences of those issues.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-001 Textual Contraception

        This cross-listed course examines how women writers address reproductive health subjects across a wide body of literary texts and periods. As a field, gynecology and obstetrics was founded by male practitioners who largely defined the female body in terms of dis/ability. Since the late nineteenth-century, women writers have used literature as a space for challenging cultural attitudes toward women’s bodies and reproductive health. From Charlotte Perkins Gilman to Judy Blume to Margaret Atwood, how do women writers define “woman” and the female body? How do they use literary spaces, and fiction especially, as a platform for teaching readers and raising awareness about reproductive health subjects such as birth control or sexually-transmitted diseases? We will discuss these issues throughout the semester in literary texts from several genres and periods.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-002 American Women's Life-Writing

        This cross-listed course focuses on the journey motif across several sub-genres of life-writing including travel narratives, confessional poetry, short essays, blogs, and autopics (films). How is the concept of the journey used in American women’s life writing? How does it function as a writing technique, impacting the organization, setting, prose, and character(s)? What does it mean to construct one’s identity as a woman through life-writing? Why is the journey important for these writers in their exploration of identity and womanhood? We will discuss life writing as a literary form by exploring such questions in texts written by American women from the late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-004 American Women's Life-Writing

        This cross-listed course focuses on the journey motif across several sub-genres of life-writing including travel narratives, confessional poetry, short essays, blogs, and autopics (films). How is the concept of the journey used in American women’s life writing? How does it function as a writing technique, impacting the organization, setting, prose, and character(s)? What does it mean to construct one’s identity as a woman through life-writing? Why is the journey important for these writers in their exploration of identity and womanhood? We will discuss life writing as a literary form by exploring such questions in texts written by American women from the late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-003 American Women's Life-Writing

        This cross-listed course focuses on the journey motif across several sub-genres of life-writing including travel narratives, confessional poetry, short essays, blogs, and autopics (films). How is the concept of the journey used in American women’s life writing? How does it function as a writing technique, impacting the organization, setting, prose, and character(s)? What does it mean to construct one’s identity as a woman through life-writing? Why is the journey important for these writers in their exploration of identity and womanhood? We will discuss life writing as a literary form by exploring such questions in texts written by American women from the late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-053 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. This section is a special service learning section of ENGL 1302, focused on immigrant communities and immigration processing issues.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-002 Textual Contraception

        This cross-listed course examines how women writers address reproductive health subjects across a wide body of literary texts and periods. As a field, gynecology and obstetrics was founded by male practitioners who largely defined the female body in terms of dis/ability. Since the late nineteenth-century, women writers have used literature as a space for challenging cultural attitudes toward women’s bodies and reproductive health. From Charlotte Perkins Gilman to Judy Blume to Margaret Atwood, how do women writers define “woman” and the female body? How do they use literary spaces, and fiction especially, as a platform for teaching readers and raising awareness about reproductive health subjects such as birth control or sexually-transmitted diseases? We will discuss these issues throughout the semester in literary texts from several genres and periods.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-001 American Women's Life-Writing

        This cross-listed course focuses on the journey motif across several sub-genres of life-writing including travel narratives, confessional poetry, short essays, blogs, and autopics (films). How is the concept of the journey used in American women’s life writing? How does it function as a writing technique, impacting the organization, setting, prose, and character(s)? What does it mean to construct one’s identity as a woman through life-writing? Why is the journey important for these writers in their exploration of identity and womanhood? We will discuss life writing as a literary form by exploring such questions in texts written by American women from the late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-004 American Women's Life-Writing

        This cross-listed course focuses on the journey motif across several sub-genres of life-writing including travel narratives, confessional poetry, short essays, blogs, and autopics (films). How is the concept of the journey used in American women’s life writing? How does it function as a writing technique, impacting the organization, setting, prose, and character(s)? What does it mean to construct one’s identity as a woman through life-writing? Why is the journey important for these writers in their exploration of identity and womanhood? We will discuss life writing as a literary form by exploring such questions in texts written by American women from the late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-003 American Women's Life-Writing

        This cross-listed course focuses on the journey motif across several sub-genres of life-writing including travel narratives, confessional poetry, short essays, blogs, and autopics (films). How is the concept of the journey used in American women’s life writing? How does it function as a writing technique, impacting the organization, setting, prose, and character(s)? What does it mean to construct one’s identity as a woman through life-writing? Why is the journey important for these writers in their exploration of identity and womanhood? We will discuss life writing as a literary form by exploring such questions in texts written by American women from the late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-001 AMERICAN LITERATURE/TOPICS IN WOMENS AND GENDER STUDIES

        This cross-listed course focuses on the journey motif across several sub-genres of life-writing including travel narratives, confessional poetry, short essays, blogs, and autopics (films). How is the concept of the journey used in American women’s life writing? How does it function as a writing technique, impacting the organization, setting, prose, and character(s)? What does it mean to construct one’s identity as a woman through life-writing? Why is the journey important for these writers in their exploration of identity and womanhood? We will discuss life writing as a literary form by exploring such questions in texts written by American women from the late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-002 AMERICAN LITERATURE/TOPICS IN WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

        This cross-listed course focuses on the journey motif across several sub-genres of life-writing including travel narratives, confessional poetry, short essays, blogs, and autopics (films). How is the concept of the journey used in American women’s life writing? How does it function as a writing technique, impacting the organization, setting, prose, and character(s)? What does it mean to construct one’s identity as a woman through life-writing? Why is the journey important for these writers in their exploration of identity and womanhood? We will discuss life writing as a literary form by exploring such questions in texts written by American women from the late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-001 AMERICAN LITERATURE/TOPICS IN WOMENS AND GENDER STUDIES

        This cross-listed course focuses on the journey motif across several sub-genres of life-writing including travel narratives, confessional poetry, short essays, blogs, and autopics (films). How is the concept of the journey used in American women’s life writing? How does it function as a writing technique, impacting the organization, setting, prose, and character(s)? What does it mean to construct one’s identity as a woman through life-writing? Why is the journey important for these writers in their exploration of identity and womanhood? We will discuss life writing as a literary form by exploring such questions in texts written by American women from the late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-002 AMERICAN LITERATURE/TOPICS IN WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

        This cross-listed course focuses on the journey motif across several sub-genres of life-writing including travel narratives, confessional poetry, short essays, blogs, and autopics (films). How is the concept of the journey used in American women’s life writing? How does it function as a writing technique, impacting the organization, setting, prose, and character(s)? What does it mean to construct one’s identity as a woman through life-writing? Why is the journey important for these writers in their exploration of identity and womanhood? We will discuss life writing as a literary form by exploring such questions in texts written by American women from the late-nineteenth through twenty-first centuries.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-102 Engineering Problem Solving

        This is the Writing/Communications Section for ENGR 1300-102: Engineering Problem Solving.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-067 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-052 Rhetoric and Composition I

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-001 Composition and Rhetoric II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Summer - 5 Weeks II - 2017Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-003 TOPICS IN WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

        This is a cross-listed course: ENGL 2303 / WOMS 2301.  

        In the late-nineteenth century, women became increasing involved in medical science and practice, especially in the field of gynecology, which emerged as a new field in 1876.  Social reformers and feminist writers including Louisa May Alcott, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Annie Nathan Meyer responded to these developments by voicing their own opinions on gynecological practice and women in medicine, often calling for reform.  This semester, we will read three social reform novels and a variety of short fiction written by women writers who used the genre of fiction for didactic purposes.  In other words, they used fiction for political arguments on women’s health during a period of censorship on “obscene” subject matter.  In reading these texts, we will seek to answer such questions as: How does medical practice influence women’s bodies?  How might these reform measures positively or negatively influence gender roles?  In what ways does fiction function as a genre for social reform arguments?  How were these literary texts influenced by other social reform movements including dress reform, social purity, and even the birth control movement?    

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-103 Engineering Problem Solving

        This is the "lab" or writing component for ENGR 1300-003. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • WOMS 2301-001 TOPICS IN WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES

        This is a cross-listed course: ENGL 2303 / WOMS 2301.  

        In the late-nineteenth century, women became increasing involved in medical science and practice, especially in the field of gynecology, which emerged as a new field in 1876.  Social reformers and feminist writers including Louisa May Alcott, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Annie Nathan Meyer responded to these developments by voicing their own opinions on gynecological practice and women in medicine, often calling for reform.  This semester, we will read three social reform novels and a variety of short fiction written by women writers who used the genre of fiction for didactic purposes.  In other words, they used fiction for political arguments on women’s health during a period of censorship on “obscene” subject matter.  In reading these texts, we will seek to answer such questions as: How does medical practice influence women’s bodies?  How might these reform measures positively or negatively influence gender roles?  In what ways does fiction function as a genre for social reform arguments?  How were these literary texts influenced by other social reform movements including dress reform, social purity, and even the birth control movement?    

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGR 1300-006 Engineering Problem Solving - Writing Instruction

        This course is the technical writing and communications portion of the larger math course. Broad introduction to the profession of engineering and its different disciplines, through the process of applying the principles of mathematics to solve real-life engineering problems and technical writing assignments. Math topics are presented within the context of engineering applications and reinforced through examples from engineering courses. Also introduces algorithm development through the use of the engineering analysis software MATLAB. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1421 (or concurrent enrollment), MATH 1426 (or concurrent enrollment) or MATH 2425 (or concurrent enrollment).

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2329-014 AMERICAN LITERATURE

        "Literature and Science in the Long Nineteenth Century": How did science and literature develop into distinct, professional fields? In the early nineteenth century, the distinction between science and literature did not exist.  As the century progressed, both fields emerged, yet intersections and tensions remain even into the twenty-first century.  What did this mean for the creation of knowledge?  How did this affect constructions of race, sex, gender, and class?  This course will explore those questions in a variety of fictional and non-fictional literary works by such authors including Henry James, John James Audubon, Edward Bellamy, Mark Twain, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, and many more! 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1302-007 Composition & Rhetoric II

        Continues ENGL 1301, but with an emphasis on advanced techniques of academic argument. Includes issue identification, independent library research, analysis and evaluation of sources, and synthesis of sources with students’ own claims, reasons, and evidence. This course focuses on critical engagement with ethical and social issues and the development of academic arguments that communicate a specific point of view. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ENGL 1301.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-007 Rhetoric and Composition

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-010 Rhetoric and Composition

        Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument. 

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-006 Engl 1301-006

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 1301-015 ENGL 1301-015

        ENGL 1301 RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION I: Introduction to college reading and writing. Emphasizes recursive writing processes, rhetorical analysis, synthesis of sources, and argument. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013Contact info & Office Hours

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2013
    • ENGL 0305, ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, ENGL 2327, ENGL 2328
      • May 2013 Developmental English; Composition and Rhetoric I & II; American Literature Survey I & II

        I have previously taught the following courses at Collin College and Tarrant County College: ENGL 0305: Developmental English; ENGL 1301: Composition and Rhetoric I; ENGL 1302: Literary Analysis; ENGL 2327: American Literature Survey I (Colonization to 1865); ENGL 2328: American Literature Survey II (1865 to Present); and STSC 0100: College Success. Additionally, I taught ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302 in dual credit and online formats. I have also taught multiple Maymester and Summer sessions. 

  • 2016
    • Invited Lecture
      • Nov 2016 ENGL 5326: Topics in American Literature Before 1900: Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson

        I visited Dr. Henderson’s graduate class per her invitation to discuss my article, “Always Already Sexual: New Materialism in Whitman’s Leaves of Grass,” which was included on the syllabus for assigned reading.

  • 2018
    • Invited Lecture
      • 2018 ENGL 5370: Scholarly Publication

        I gave an invited talk for Dr. Beck’s graduate class per her invitation to discuss finding appropriate venues for publication, submitting an article for publication, and my own publication experiences as an early career scholar. 

    • Invited Lecture
      • 2018 WGST 50103: Feminist Inquiry

        I gave an invited talk for Dr. Robbins’ graduate class per her invitation to discuss my research on early feminist body theories in medical fiction and my current book project, Un(dis)covered Bodies.

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Apr 2014 to  June 2014 First Year Writing Committee

      I served on the ENGL 1301 First Year Writing Committee during the summer of 2014.  Committee duties included revising the FYW program syllabus, choosing readings, and revising assignments.

    • Sept 2014 to  Oct 2014 Co-Host, North Texas Writing Center Association Conference Committee

      As part of my managerial position in the English Writing Center, I co-hosted the NTWCA Conference alongside the Writing Center Director and created promotional materials for the event. 

    • Aug 2015 to  May 2016 Graduate Student Advisory Board, Women's and Gender Studies Program

      For FY15-16, I will serve as a representative on the Graduate Student Advisory Board for the Womens and Gender Studies Program.  As a representative, I will also serve on a committee organizing the symposium held at UT Arlington on Oct 29, 2015, "Minding the Field: Exploring and Expanding Womens and Gender Studies in North Texas." 
       

    • Aug 2016 to  June 2017 Conference Chair

      Conference Chair for "From Student to Cyborg: A Digital Humanities Workshop for Girls," which will be hosted by the Women’s and Gender Studies Program on June 10, 2017. 

  • Volunteered
    • Apr 2014 to  Apr 2014 Duncan Robinson Essay Contest Judging Panel

      My work on this panel involved reading essay submissions for the First Year English Program's writing contest, voting on favorite submissions, deciding first, second, and third place finalists, and attending all meetings for the judging of submissions. 

  • Elected
    • Aug 2015 to  May 2016 Conference Co-Chair, 4th Annual English Graduate Student Conference

      In April 2015, the UTA English Graduate Student Association alongside the Department of English will host the fourth annual English Graduate Student Conference.  From August 2014-April 2015, I will serve in organizing the conference alongside my co-chair and colleague, Robert La Rue.

    • Apr 2016 to  May 2017 President, English Graduate Student Association

      Nominated President of the English Graduate Student Association for AY2016-2017.

Administrative Appointment

  • 2014
    • Aug 2014 to July 2016 - Writing Center Digital Media Coordinator (Manager), University of Texas at Arlington   Department of English