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Timothy Richardson

Name

[Richardson, Timothy]
  • Associate Professor, English
  • Assoc Prof

Biography

Timothy Richardson is the author of Contingency, Immanence, and the Subject of Rhetoric. His work has appeared in such journals as JAC, Kairos, Pre/Text, Paris Review, and Western Humanities Review. He is Associate Professor of English at the University of Texas at Arlington, where he teaches courses in antique and contemporary rhetorics, psychoanalytic theory, media studies, and writing.

Professional Preparation

    • 2004 Ph.D. in English, Critical Theory & RhetoricLoyola University Chicago
    • 1997 M.F.A. in Creative Writing, PoetryOld Dominion University
    • 1994 BA in EnglishUniversity of North Texas

Appointments

    • Sept 2011 to Present Associate Professor of English, Tenured
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2004 to Aug 2011 Assistant Professor of English
      University of Texas at Arlington

Memberships

  • Professional
    • May 2013 to Present Rhetoric Society of America

Research and Expertise

  • Classical and Contemporary Rhetorics

    Much of my work (in particular, my book) has looked to intersections between Classical / Late Antique rhetorics and contemporary theoretical concerns. My current activity is informed by this early work as I look to other (digital, aural, filmic) modes of persuasion.

  • Critical Theory (particularly psychoanalysis)

    Much of my academic inquiry is informed by my continuing study of (Lacanian) psychoanalysis and the theoretical work in conversation with it.

  • New Media/Visual Rhetoric/Film

    Along with ongoing work in film/television studies, I am interested in digital production and sound studies as rhetorical enterprises.

  • Early Jewish Thought/Exegesis

    Early Jewish thought is an alternative and often contrary starting point for histories of Western rhetoric and I am committed to its inclusion in the discussion of the rhetorical canon.

  • Creative Writing/The Craft of Poetry

    My MFA is in creative writing and I continue to teach, write, and publish poetry.

Publications

      Journal Article 2014
      •  "The Authenticity of What's Next." Enculturation 17 (2014).

        Enculturation is a refereed online open-access journal devoted to contemporary theories of rhetoric, writing, and culture.

        {Journal Article }

      Poetry 2012 2012
      • "The Fat Man." Archaeopteryx 1 (2012): 41-56

        {Poetry }

      Journal Article 2010
      • “The Looks of Men: Doubling and Nostalgia in Mad Men.”  Popular Culture Review 21.1 (2010): 21-31.

        PCR is the refereed journal of Far West Popular Culture and American Culture Associations, sponsored by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and is published twice yearly.

        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2009
      • "Love is a Battlefield: Sacrifice, the Abject, and Better Parenting through Lying." Pre/Text 19.2 (2009): 97-120. Pre/Text is an inter-disciplinary journal of rhetoric.

        {Journal Article }

      Poetry 2008
      • “Abraham.” American Literary Review 19.2 (Fall 2008): 96-97. ALR is a journal of new writing and has been published since 1990 through the Creative Writing Program of the Department of English at the University of North Texas.

        {Poetry }

      Journal Article 2008
      • “Bereshith.” Kairos 12.3 (2008). Kairos is a refereed open-access online journal exploring the intersections of rhetoric, technology, and pedagogy and reaches a wide audience - approximately 45,000 readers per month.

        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2005
      • The Demand of God: The Relation of Narrative to Fantasy in The Chronicle of Solomon bar Simson. ”Chasing Esther: Jewish Expressions of Cultural Difference.Ed. David Metzger and Peter Schulman. Santa Monica and Haifa: Kol Katan Press (an imprint of The University of Haifa P), 2005.136-154.

        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 2004
      • "Writing (and Doing) Trauma Study." JAC: A Journal of Rhetoric, Culture, and Politics 24.2 (2004): 491-507.

        {Journal Article }

      Poetry 2000
      • "The Luminous Boy," "Oubliette," "Freud Before the Fireplace." Paris Review 154 (Spring 2000): 145-149.

        {Poetry }
      2000
      • "What Has Not Happened Here," "How to be Naked in Public."Paris Review 155 (Summer 2000): 150-152.

        {Poetry }

      Book Chapter 1999
      • “Brian Eno and the Music of the Spheres: The Possibility of a Postmodern Church.” Studies in Medievalism X: Medievalism and the Academy II. London: Boydell and Brewer, 1999. 216-231.

        {Book Chapter }

      Journal Article 1998
      • "Reading, the Masculine: An Orientation of the Community of Readers." Literature and Psychology 44.1-2 (1998): 96-112.

        {Journal Article }

      Poetry 1998
      • "The Out-Breeders." The North American Review 283.6 (Nov.-Dec. 1998): 16.

        {Poetry }
      1998
      • "The Visible Man." Western Humanities Review LII.4 (Winter 1998): 306.

        {Poetry }

      Journal Article 1997
      • Richardson, Timothy and Anthony Enns. "Truth as Disease: Psychosis and Knowing in The Prisoner and The X-Files." Popular Culture Review 8.2 (1997): 35-42.
        {Journal Article }

      Poetry 1997
      • "Comfort." Impossible Object 1.2 (1997).

        {Poetry }

Presentations

    • March  2017
      Toward a More Ethical Writing Assessment: Cultivating Risk, Range, and Reflection with the Learning Record
      Roundtable presentation and discussion with: Ron Brooks, Oklahoma State University Kendall Gerdes, Texas Tech University Steven LeMieux, University of Texas at Austin Sean McCarthy, James Madison University
    • May  2016
      "The Future of Sin"

      Late in A Rhetoric of Motives, Kenneth Burke claims that “[b]iologically, it is of the essence of man to desire. But by the same token, biologically it is of the essence of man to be sated” on his way to positing a “pure persuasion” that is both transcendent and object-less. In most popular media, The Future has always been about desire and its satiation. This presentation takes up recent popular films and television--Ex Machina, Humans, HBO’s new Westworld series--that project social transgression (sin) into the future to allow a practical means by which an audience may safely enjoy. These projects perform a kind of epideictic rhetoric for a satiated Future by casting contemporary desires forward so that they will have been addressed, tamed, via civic and commercial routines. The “symbolic getting” offered by these films delays any real getting and thereby guarantees that each iteration of sin is partial, frustrating, and enjoyable. Through a ritual of getting by not-getting yet, The Future promises what Burke calls “a purchasable miracle.”

    • April  2016
      "Englines of Desire"

      Despite (or because of) Jacques Lacan’s insistence that there is no such thing as sexual rapport, popular films and television series have much invested in projecting presumed and successful heteronormative relationships onto our screens. Todd McGowan argues that these consummate relationships continue to have such heft because they offer “a fantasmatic solution to a fundamental social antagonism--that of sexual difference” (2011). The fantasy of complementarity that these entertainment pieces allow may be a valuable prosthetic, as they assure us “that antagonism is empirical rather than ontological and that we can always overcome it.” Speculative film and television let us know that we will overcome that antagonism in the future, often with the help of fantastic machines.

      Recent television and film (Black Mirror 2012-2013, Ex Machina 2015, Humans 2015) both perform and critique the (primarily masculine) fantasy future of happy union via a technological Other. If “Woman is the symptom of Man,” these often posit mechanical and digital prosthetics for a missing feminine. And they demonstrate that, contrary to the assumption that digital immediacy and the constancy of social networks are marks of the public sphere encroaching on private space, the private actually colonizes the public (Zizek 2014). How might fantasy adapt to tensions between the call of public participation and private enjoyment? In what ways do ubiquitous and almost invisible technologies offer to shape the sexual (non)relationship? And what does technology want?

    • May  2014
      "The Old Sound of Now""

      Naively, we understand that listening, like reading, takes time. Noise often lasts beyond an instant, but recordings of sound persist beyond context while still retaining traces of their context. “Sound…is audible only over time. We hear sound as it decays” (Rushkoff). Recently, Mark Fisher applied the Derridian term hauntology to a kind of music arising primarily in Great Britain. Using techniques derived from field recording and musique concrete, the project of this kind of performance is to aesthetically organize the pops, crackles, and scratches of old recordings such that context is overprivileged to the extent that it is derealized. The hauntological contemporizes the old, thereby reifying the atemporal, flattening potential of the digital archive.

    • May  2012
      "Against and Old-fashioned Future; or The Authenticity of What's Next"

      Recent work by Bruce Sterling, Kevin Kelly, and especially the graphic novelist Warren Ellis argue for (and sometimes critique) the future (of whatever) by tying their futures to a recognizable past so that an audience may identify with the project or product. In effect, the past may be reconstituted as a future we can identify with in the present. It may be impossible to present a truly revolutionary future insofar as the myth of progress--“where are our flying cars!”--enforces the standard story and maintains what Sterling has called the atemporality of the early 21st century. Steven Shaviro has pointed out that we have had the same cyberpunk future for the past 30 years. Reading the above with and against Kenneth Burke’s and Jacques Lacan’s insights on identification, antagonism, and the subject, this presentation explores deliberative arguments for and critiques of an Authentic Future by examining ways by which these arguments depend on nostalgia to present a palatable what-should-or-may-be-next.

    • March  2012
      "Authenticity & Warren Ellis"

      This presentation considers Warren Ellis and Ivan Rodriguez's graphic novel Doktor Sleepless as both a performance and critique of "authenticity."

    • May  2010
      “Home Bodies: Prosthetic People and the Economy of Desire”

      This presentation considers the founding of home life via the unhomely addition of Reborn infants and RealDoll girlfriends as prosthetic devices intended to alleviate suffering and both create and avoid family.  Burke (1969) insists that identity as such is founded consubstantially, in relation to other people, of course, but also to objects, beliefs, etc.  This speaker will follow Japanese roboticist Masahiro Mori's (1970, 2005) hypothosis of the Uncanny Valley - suplemented by psychoanalytic insights (Fink 1995 & 2007, Lacan 1998, McGowan 2008) - to elaborate on the manners in which these prostheses facilitate/hinder the social role of family and sexual identity for some subjects.  The argument is that these artificial arrangements not only mirror so-called normal human relashionships but in fact function as amplifications of accepted social practice for outsiders.  The effect for the participant is a felt inclusion into a regularized social order while, for the outsider, the result is discomfort stemming from the prosthetic's vulgar indication of a fundamental lack in the human.   Zizek (1997) claims that the prosthetic addresses a lack, not a loss; it is not a replacement, but a supplement.  Reborns and the Real Dolls make clear that one can purchase a child or mail-order a lover and that, as unheimliche as it seems, one version of family may be a home for bodies.

    • March  2009
      “The Looks of Men: The Gaze and Nostalgia in Mad Men”

      This presentation considers the television program Mad Men in terms of the staging of the Lacanian gaze and argues that this staging is a performance of (and not the site of) nostalgia.

    • May  2006
      “Two Torahs: Rabbinic Notions of Text & the Transmission of Knowledge”

      no description available

    • March  2006
      “Close Reading” in “From Panel to Gallery: Twelve Digital Writings, One Installation”

      no description available

    • February  2006
      “In the Company of Men: Cruelty and Law in the Films of Neil LaBute”

      no description available

  • Past
    •  
      "Neil LaBute and the Shape of Man." A Symposium in Rhetoric: Rhetoric and Culture, Commerce, Texas, February 25, 2005.
  • Past
    •  
      "The Body and Other Disasters in X-Men: The Movie. " 13th Annual Far West Popular and American Culture Association, Las Vegas, NV, Feb. 2001.
  • Past
    •  
      "Post Modern Divinity: The Conflation of Culture and God in the Work of Brian Eno." Craft, Critique, Culture: An Interdisciplinary Conference on Writing in the Academy, Iowa City, Iowa, September 29-October 1, 2000.
  • Past
    •  
      "The Force of the Word: God's Lack and the Support of Creation." Third Annual National Lacan Symposium, Chicago, IL, Spring 1999.
  • Past
    •  
      "God the Subject and the Other Bible." Semiotics Society of America, Toronto, Ontario, Fall 1998.
  • Past
    •  
      "Nabokov and the Possibility of AnOther World." Semiotics Society of America, Louisville, Kentucky, Fall 1997.
  • Past
    •  
      "Reading, the Masculine: An Orientation of the Community of Readers." Second Annual National Lacan Symposium, Columbia, MO, Summer 1997.

Projects

  • 2016
    • Aug 2016 to Present Speculation and Worldbuilding

      Speculation.wiki is a consistently updated site of resources and links, as well as the portal for a set of concurrently-run courses that I taught with colleagues at other institutions. These courses focused on world-building fictions and their uses. Students from different institutions and disciplines collaborated on speculative projects (both digital and physical) in order to model other possibilities. What situations are possible that maybe do not exactly exist right now? What problems may attend? What benefits? After the initial run, our plan is to invite other courses in different disciplines in an ongoing world-building enterprise. The sit is consistently updated with links to tools and information.

      Role: Coinvestigator PI: Cedrick May

Other Research Activities

  • 2015
    • Digital Research
      • June 2015 Digital Humanities Summer Institute

        Dr. Richardson particpated in the "Sound of :: in Digital Humanities" course on audio recording and production.

        "The Digital Humanities Summer Institute provides an ideal environment for discussing and learning about new computing technologies and how they are influencing teaching, research, dissemination, creation, and preservation in different disciplines, via a community-based approach.

        A time of intensive coursework, seminars, and lectures, participants at DHSI share ideas and methods, and develop expertise in using advanced technologies. Every summer, the institute brings together faculty, staff, and students from the Arts, Humanities, Library, and Archives communities as well as independent scholars and participants from areas beyond." (http://www.dhsi.org/)

Students Supervised

Courses

      • ENGL 4374-001 WRITING, RHETORIC, AND MULTIMODAL AUTHORING II

        Writing, Rhetoric, Multimodal II is an advanced theory and practice course that will emphasize writing, audio editing, web and print design, and design thinking more generally through project-oriented work. This section of the course will focus on the nature and future of various real and imagined versions of “the city” in order to get at (for example) how they can be different and similar, how they are represented popularly, how they may be reimagined, etc.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5311-001 FOUNDATIONS OF RHETORIC AND COMPOSITION

        If we take as given that there is a single field of study called (in whatever order you prefer) Rhetoric-and-Composition, then there is likely (supposed to be) some intersection of composition and rhetoric that we can address both theoretically and practically. Very early on, for instance, Rhetoric Theory becomes (at least in some circles) an underpinning of education. And even now it is difficult to imagine an artless persuasion (though some academic articles make a stab at it). This course is not a survey, but a reading across the field(s) in order to come to some understanding of what may be useful about the bar we have set in the middle of Rhet/Comp studies, where the stakes are currently, and what might continue to matter.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3385-001 TOPICS IN RHETORIC

        Where we are is never silent. The ubiquity of sound often leads to us to ignore the sonic attributes of our surroundings and the ways in which sounds encourage or discourage behavior, mirror and enforce power structures, and persuade us toward action or inaction. This course will focus on (some of) these issues.What are the rhetorical effects, possibilities, and limitations of recorded sound, and how do they compare to the effects, possibilities, and limitations of writing? What makes for effective communication when it comes to recorded sound?

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4348-001 Adv Creative Writing: Poetry

        This course is designed to be an intensive practice in the craft of poetry and study of the creative process through close readings of poems, essays on craft, and the workshopping of students' poems. Though the emphasis of this course is necessarily on craft, writing poems also means engaging with other (written, visual, aural, etc.) texts. That is, poetry has a relationship with the world.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-003 Rhetoric and the Future

        Rhetoric and the Future considers some of the ways we talk about the future, how we argue for and describe it, in order to better understand what sorts of arguments are successful and what “successful” means. Taking seriously William Gibson’s claim that “the future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed,” we are most interested in how the future is figured now, for whom it is being offered, what these visions say about our own wants, and what we can learn of the motivations and assumptions behind those offerings.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5380-001 Rhetoric and the Future

        Rhetoric and the Future considers some of the ways we talk about the future, how we argue for and describe it, in order to better understand what sorts of arguments are successful and what “successful” means. Taking seriously William Gibson’s claim that “the future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed,” we are most interested in how the future is figured now, for whom it is being offered, what these visions say about our own wants, and what we can learn of the motivations and assumptions behind those offerings.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Writing About Film

        This course will focus on (some of) those films that offer versions of the high school experience, certainly with an eye to what they say, but just as certainly with an eye toward how they present whatever they seem to say.  This means that, though this is not a course in film studies or history but “writing about film,” we will pay a great deal of attention to the language and elements of films (those that are common with literature, for instance, and those that are specific to the genre).

        Winter - Intersession - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4348-001 Adv Creative Writing: Poetry

        This course is designed to be an intensive practice in the craft of poetry and study of the creative process through close readings of poems, essays on craft, and the workshopping of students poems. Though the emphasis of this course is necessarily on craft, writing poems also means engaging with other (written, visual, aural, etc.) texts. That is, poetry has a relationship with the world.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5330-001 Psychoanalysis and Film

        Since the late1960s, film theory has been largely—if broadly—psychoanalytic. “Psychoanalysis & Film” is an introduction to (particularly Lacanian) psychoanalytic thought via film studies and readings.  The expected outcome of this short session is relatively conversant knowledge in some principles of Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and use for film analysis.

      • ENGL 5350-001 History of Rhetoric I - Classical Rhetoric

        This course is an introduction to the earliest traditions of rhetoric. But as we follow the grand recit of rhetoric from the Sophists to Augustine—in some sense, a journey from display to interpretation—we will consider what these texts allege regarding the definition and limits of rhetoric and its relationship to/with other (ancient and contemporary) critical systems. What are the differences (if any) between rhetoric and other systems that claim a body of knowledge (philosophy, religion, politics)? Can the differences (if any) be expressed in terms of suppositions about what words (should, can) do? In particular, we will be looking at some examples of late antique Rabbinic exegesis with an eye (or ear) toward discovering how the tradition may fit with the study of classical rhetorics.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Pop Culture in Contemporary Poetry

        While primarily a literature course intended to investigate the place and purpose of poetry, this course also assumes that poetry needn’t necessarily draw from a (learned or received) past.  Fine, engaging poetry may also find its material in what we all already (think we) know.  For this reason, all of the poems we will read this session appeal in some manner to popular (some might call it low, but not us) culture in order to say something, if not new, then hopefully useful.

        Winter - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4348-001 Adv Creative Writing: Poetry

        This course is designed to be an intensive practice in the craft of poetry and study of the creative process through close readings of poems, essays on craft, and the workshopping of students' poems. Though the emphasis of this course is necessarily on craft, writing poems also means engaging with other (written, visual, aural, etc.) texts. That is, poetry has a relationship with the world.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Writing About Film

        This course will focus on (some of) those films that offer versions of the high school experience, certainly with an eye to what they say, but just as certainly with an eye toward how they present whatever they seem to say.  This means that, though this is not a course in film studies or history but “writing about film,” we will pay a great deal of attention to the language and elements of films (those that are common with literature, for instance, and those that are specific to the genre).  Beyond the work we do in class, grades will be based on various shorter assignments and analytical-critical studies of films.  Since time in class is limited, students will be expected to spend time outside of class seeing and studying additional films

      • ENGL 5380-001 The Future of Sin

        “The Future of Sin” considers some of the ways we talk about The Future as a site of indulgence or transgression. Taking seriously William Gibson’s claim that “the future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed,” we are most interested in how futures are figured, what these visions say about our own wants, and the means through which a future can give body to desire.

        Readings will be various and may include work from rhetorical theory, design and human/computer interface theory, literature, design fiction, and new futurism. Much of the coursework will be born-digital — it’s the future — but no prior knowledge or ability in specific computer applications is required. Class will be divided between seminar discussions and studio work and will consist of both solitary and collaborative projects, including several presentations.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4399-001 Speculation & World Building

        Presenting a convincing world means that you have to be convincing. “Speculation & World Building” will consider some of the ways we imagine a world other than ours, how we argue for and describe it in order to better understand what sorts of arguments are successful and what “successful” means. Readings will be various and may include work from rhetorical theory, design and human/computer interface theory, literature, design fiction, and new futurism. Class time will be divided between seminar discussions and studio work and will consist of both solitary and collaborative projects (some writing, some making and building) with other students in our course and at TCU and Alma College, where related courses are being offered.

        Readings will be various and may include work from psychoanalytic theory, literature, design fiction, and new futurism. Much of the coursework will be “born-digital,” but no prior knowledge or ability in specific computer applications is required. Class time will be divided between seminar discussions and studio work and will consist of both solitary and collaborative projects, including several presentations.

        Readings will be various and may include work from rhetorical theory, design and human/computer interface theory, literature, design fiction, and new futurism.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Pop Culture in Contemporary Poetry

        Good poetry doesn’t necessarily need to draw from a (boring) past. Fine, engaging poetry may also find its material in what we all already (think we) know.  For this reason, all of the poems we will read this session appeal in some manner to popular (some might call it low, but not us) culture in order to say something, if not new, then hopefully useful. So, we will read fine poems about Superman, Godzilla, Barbie, cartoon characters, all with an eye to discovering what these poems share with the poetic tradition without having to repeat that tradition verbatim.

        Winter - Intersession - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4348-001 Adv Creative Writing: Poetry

        This course is designed to be an intensive practice in the craft of poetry and study of the creative process through close readings of poems, essays on craft, and the workshopping of students' poems. Though the emphasis of this course is necessarily on craft, writing poems also means engaging with other (written, visual, aural, etc.) texts. That is, poetry has a relationship with the world.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4355-001 LITERARY CRITICISM I

        The study of literature is a tradition because literature begs to be talked about.  This course will consider various traditional approaches to what literature does (or what what-would-become-literature did) with an ear toward critique as we consider their efficacy here and now.  Class sessions will include lecture, discussion, workshops, peer groups.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-011 TOPICS IN LITERATURE: Writing About Film

        This course will consider some films that offer versions of the high school experience, certainly with an eye to what they say, but just as certainly with an eye and ear toward how they present whatever they seem to say.  This means that, though this is not a course in film studies or history but “writing about film,” we will pay a great deal of attention to the language and elements of films (those that are common with literature, for instance, and those that are specific to the medium). Since time in class is limited, students will be expected to spend time outside of class watching and studying additional films.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5360-001 English 5360: Psychoanalysis & Film

        Most generally, this course is an introduction to Lacanian psychoanalytic thought, its difficulties and its usefulness, via films and readings.  The expected outcome of this short session is relatively conversant knowledge in some principles of Lacanian psychoanalytic theory and application and, more practically, a polished conference presentation ready to take on the road

      • ENGL 4356-001 Literary Criticism II

        The study of literature is a tradition because literature begs to be talked about.  This course will consider various recent approaches to what literature does with an ear toward critique as we consider their efficacy here and now.  Class sessions will include lecture, discussion, workshops, peer groups.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5311-001 Foundations of Rhetoric and Composition

        If we take as given that there is a single field of study called (in whatever order you prefer) Rhetoric-and-Composition, then there is likely (supposed to be) some intersection of composition and rhetoric that we can address both theoretically and practically. Very early on, for instance, Rhetoric Theory becomes (at least in some circles) an underpinning of education. And even now it is difficult to imagine an artless persuasion (though some academic articles make a stab at it). This course is not a survey, but a reading across (some of the) the field(s) in order to come to some thoughts of what may be useful about the bar we have set in the middle of Rhet/Comp studies, where the stakes are currently, and what might continue to matter.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Popular Culture in Contemporary Poetry

        Good poetry doesn’t necessarily need to draw from a (boring) past. Fine, engaging poetry may also find its material in what we all already (think we) know.  For this reason, all of the poems we will read this session appeal in some manner to popular (some might call it low, but not us) culture in order to say something, if not new, then hopefully useful. So, we will read fine poems about Superman, Godzilla, Barbie, cartoon characters, all with an eye to discovering what these poems share with the poetic tradition without having to repeat that tradition verbatim.

        Winter - Intersession - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4348-001 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry

        This course is designed to be an intensive practice in the craft of poetry and study of the creative process through close readings of poems, essays on craft, and the workshopping of students' poems. Though the emphasis of this course is necessarily on craft, writing poems also means engaging with other (written, visual, aural, etc.) texts. That is, poetry has a relationship with the world.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4355-001 Literary Criticism I

        The study of literature is a tradition because literature begs to be talked about.  This course will consider various traditional approaches to what literature does (or what what-would-become-literature did) with an ear toward critique as we consider their efficacy here and now.  Class sessions will include lecture, discussion, workshops, peer groups.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Writing About Film

        This course will focus on (some of) those films that offer versions of the high school experience, certainly with an eye to what they say, but just as certainly with an eye toward how they present whatever they seem to say.  This means that, though this is not a course in film studies or history but “writing about film,” we will pay a great deal of attention to the language and elements of films (those that are common with literature, for instance, and those that are specific to the genre).  Beyond the work we do in class, grades will be based on various shorter assignments and analytical-critical studies of films.  Since time in class is limited, students will be expected to spend time outside of class seeing and studying additional films.

      • ENGL 4399-002 Rhetorics of the Future

        Rhetoric of the Future will consider some of the ways we talk about the future, how we argue for and describe it in order to better understand what sorts of arguments are successful and what “successful” means. Taking seriously William Gibson’s claim that “the future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed,” we will be most interested in how the future is figured and what we can learn of the motivations and assumptions behind those descriptions.

        Readings will be various and may include work from rhetorical theory, design and human/computer interface theory, literature, design fiction, and new futurism. Some of the authors whose work we will consider are Rachel Armstrong, Ian Bogost, James Bridle, Jamais Cascio, Warren Ellis, Kevin Kelly, and Bruce Sterling. All coursework will be born-digital, but no prior knowledge or ability in specific computer applications is required. Class will be divided between seminar discussions and studio work and will consist of both solitary and collaborative projects, including several presentations.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 5380-001 Rhetorics of the Future

        Rhetoric of the Future will consider some of the ways we talk about the future, how we argue for and describe it in order to better understand what sorts of arguments are successful and what “successful” means. Taking seriously William Gibson’s claim that “the future is already here — it's just not very evenly distributed,” we will be most interested in how the future is figured and what we can learn of the motivations and assumptions behind those descriptions.

        Readings will be various and may include work from rhetorical theory, design and human/computer interface theory, literature, design fiction, and new futurism. Some of the authors whose work we will consider are Rachel Armstrong, Ian Bogost, James Bridle, Jamais Cascio, Warren Ellis, Kevin Kelly, and Bruce Sterling. All coursework will be born-digital, but no prior knowledge or ability in specific computer applications is required. Class will be divided between seminar discussions and studio work and will consist of both solitary and collaborative projects, including several presentations.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Popular Culture in Contemporary Poetry

        No Description Provided.

        Winter - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4348-001 Adv Creative Writing: Poetry

        800x600 This course is designed to be an intensive practice in the craft of poetry and study of the creative process through close readings of poems, essays on craft, and the workshopping of students' poems. Though the emphasis of this course is necessarily on craft, writing poems also means engaging with other (written, visual, aural, etc.) texts. That is, poetry has a relationship with the world. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4355-001 LITERARY CRITICISM I

        The study of literature is a tradition because literature begs to be talked about.This course will consider various traditional approaches to what literature does (or what what-would-become-literature did) with an ear toward critique as we consider their efficacy here and now.Class sessions will include lecture, discussion, workshops, peer groups.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 2303-001 Writing About Film

        Writing About Film will focus on (some of) those films that offer versions of the high school experience, certainly with an eye to what they say, but just as certainly with an eye toward how they present whatever they seem to say.This means that, though this is not a course in film studies or history but “writing about film,” we will pay a great deal of attention to the language and elements of films (those that are common with literature, for instance, and those that are specific to the genre).Beyond the work we do in class, grades will be based on various shorter assignments and analytical-critical studies of films.Since time in class is limited, students will be expected to spend time outside of class seeing and studying additional films. 

      • ENGL 3375-001 CREATIVE WRITING

        This course is designed to introduce students to the world of contemporary creative writing, particularly to the 3 genres of literary prose fiction, creative non-fiction essay writing and poetry.  This will be accomplished through discussions, readings, writing assignments (both in-class writing prompts and group exercises as well as takehome, typed writing assignments), and workshops.  All students will compose original works of creative non-fiction, prose fiction and poetry, culminating in three final, polished portfolios (one poetry portfolio of at least 4 poems, one fiction portfolio containing a final, polished short story of 8-10 pages and one creative non-fiction portfolio containing a final, polished creative non-fiction essay of  8-10 pages). We will practice the art of writing poetry, creative non-fiction and fiction critically as well as creatively.  We will not hold one person’s work against another’s—there is no corner on good, and there is enough excellence to go around—but against the light of the finest that has been—is being—written, and we will encourage one another to reach beyond our current grasps, remembering that we are here not in the service of ego, but of art.  We will also read and discuss some of the best contemporary poetry, non-fiction essays and short stories to see what we can steal.  By “Steal” I don’t mean plagiarize (more on this as the term progresses). Unlike literature courses, where the discussions focus mainly on subject and theme, we will discuss these works in terms of craft.  We will be architects of language, and will learn the best ways to deliver meaning to an audience.  Specifically, we will concentrate on the three “S’s” of good writing: style, structure, and specifics. Most importantly, we will learn that writing is work, but an enjoyable (and quite rewarding) form of work.

      • ENGL 4356-001 Literary Criticism II
        The study of literature is a tradition because literature begs to be talked about. This course will consider various recent approaches to what literature does with an ear toward critique as we consider their efficacy here and now. Class sessions will include lecture, discussion, workshops, peer groups
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5350-001 History of Rhetoric I - Classical Rhetoric
        This course is an introduction to the earliest traditions of rhetoric. But as we follow the grand recit of rhetoric from the Sophists to Augustine - in some sense, a journey from display to interpretation - we will consider what these texts allege regarding the definition and limits of rhetoric and its relationship to/with other (ancient and contemporary) critical systems. What are the differences (if any) between rhetoric and other systems that claim a body of knowledge (philosophy, religion, politics)? Can the differences (if any) be expressed in terms of suppositions about what words (should, can) do? In particular, we will be looking at some examples of late antique Rabbinic exegesis with an eye (or ear) toward discovering how the tradition may fit with the study of classical rhetorics.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-001 Popular Culture in Contemporary Poetry

        No Description Provided.

        Winter - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3371-001 ADVANCED EXPOSITION
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4348-001 Adv Creative Writing: Poetry
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4355-001 LITERARY CRITICISM I
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3371-001 ADVANCED EXPOSITION
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-001 Writing About Film

        No Description Provided.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 4356-001 Literary Criticism II
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5330-001 Love & Desire, in Theory
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4330-001 Advanced Creative Writing - Poetry
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 3371-001 ADVANCED EXPOSITION
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4355-001 LITERARY CRITICISM I
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 2303-001 Writing About Film

        No Description Provided.

        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • ENGL 3371-001 ADVANCED EXPOSITION
        No Description Provided.
        Summer - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4356-001 Literary Criticism II
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory and Practice
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 4356-001 Literary Criticism II
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus
      • ENGL 5300-001 Theory and Practice
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2011 Download Syllabus

Other Teaching Activities

  • 2014
    • Dissertation Committee Chair
      • Apr 2014 Myra Salcedo: "Negotiating the Sacred in Secular Writing Spaces: The Rhetoric of Religion in American University Composition Textbooks."
  • 2013
    • Dissertation Committee Chair
      • Nov 2013 Nathan Gale: "The Found Object(s) of Rhetoric"
    • Chair of Master's Thesis Committee
      • Nov 2013 Lindsey Barlow: "Breaking Trauma's Empire: Trauma and Resolution in Boardwalk Empire and Breaking Bad"

Service to the Community

  • Volunteered
    • Jan 2011 to  Oct 2012 The Place of Memory

      The Hermanns Lecture Series (co-chaired with Laura Kopchick, October 2012, at UTA)

      Presentations, readings, and performances by:

      Tim Morris, essayist and memoirist  (essays in Southwest Review, Raritan, and The American Scholar)

      Lisa Fain, food blogger and cookbook author (Homesick Texan)

      Alex Lemon, poet and teacher (Hallelujah Blackout, Happy)

      Davy and Peter Rothbart, writer and musician (FOUND magazine).

    • Jan 2009 to  Oct 2010 Creative Writing and the Academy

      The Hermanns Lecture Series (co-chaired with Laura Kopchick, October 2010, at UTA)

      Speakers:

      Kim Addonizio, (poetry: What Is This Thing Called Love, Lucifer at the Starlite)

      Ben Marcus, Columbia University (fiction: The Age of Wire and String, Notable American Women)

      Tim Seibles, Old Dominion University (poetry: Buffalo Head Solos, Hammerlock)

    • Jan 2006 to  Oct 2007 Psychoanalysis & Religious Conflict

      The Hermanns Lecture Series (co-chaired with Jackie Stodnick, October 2007, at UTA)

      Speakers:

      David Metzger (Old Dominion U.), "Mysticism and the Violence of History in Modern Jewish Literature"

      Ellie Ragland (U. Missouri - Columbia),"The Masquerade, the Veil, and the Phallic Mask: Woman and Islam"

      Ken Reinhard (UCLA), “There is Something of One (God): Lacan and Political Theology”

    • Jan 2006 to  Oct 2007 Symposium on Psychoanalysis & Belief

      Symposium after the Hermanns Lecture Series (at UTA)

      Speakers:

      Kate Briggs (U. West Georgia), “Distinguishing Faith, Certainty and Belief: Anxiety and the Ethics of Sexual Difference”

      Levi Bryant (Collin College), "The Other Face of God:  Lacan, Theological Structure, and the Accursed Remainder"

      Rajani Sudan (SMU), “The Dirt in the New Machine”

      Michael A. Johnson (UT-Austin), "My Lady Dumps: Passing Humanism"

Service to the Profession

  • Appointed
    • Oct 2011 to  May 2014 H-Net list H-JewishRhetoric

      Co-editor of the H-Net list H-JewishRhetoric (with Janice Fernheimer, University of Kentucky).

    • May 2014 to  Present External Reviewer

      External Reviewer for the journal Enculturation

    • Dec 2016 to  Present External Reviewer

      External Reviewer for the journal Philosophy and Rhetoric

  • Volunteered
    • Aug 2005 to  Present Founder and Director of the Lacan Reading Group

      A reading group dedicated to the study of the work of the French psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan. The meetings are constituted by scholars from surrounding institutions, with the bulk consisting of students and faculty from UTA.

Service to the University

  • Appointed
    • Sept 2005 to  Aug 2016 Coordinator, Creative Writing Minor

      The Coordinator helps to schedule and staff the courses that fulfill requirements for the minor, coordinates the establishment and maintenace of standards for the courses, advises students on course work and career goals, and helps to direct individual students looking for graduate instruction in creative writing towards those schools best suited for her or him.

    • Sept 2014 to  Aug 2015 Chair, Annual Evaluation Committee

      The Evaluation Committee compiles and impliments the department's annual evaluation policy of tenure-stream faculty as well as makes recommendation to the chair regarding merit raises.

    • Jan 2015 to  Present Chair, Media and Technology Committee

      The Media and Technology Committee follows technology available to the faculty, facilitates their deployment and use, and makes recommendations in response to faculty requests.

    • Sept 2015 to  Aug 2016 Chair, Annual Evaluation Committee

      The Evaluation Committee compiles and impliments the departments annual evaluation policy of tenure-stream faculty as well as makes recommendation to the chair regarding merit raises.

    • Sept 2013 to  Aug 2014 Annual Evaluation Committee

      The Evaluation Committee compiles and impliments the department's annual evaluation policy of tenure-stream faculty as well as makes recommendation to the chair regarding merit raises.

    • Sept 2012 to  Aug 2014 Graduations Admissions Committee

      This committee reviews applications to the graduate program in English at UTA.

    • Sept 2004 to  Present Graduate Studies Committee

      This committee is constituted by the graduate faculty of the English Department

    • Sept 2009 to  Aug 2010 Search Committee for Technical Writing faculty

      A member of the 3-person search committee for technical writing tenure-stream faculty member.

    • Sept 2008 to  Aug 2009 Search Committee for Composition faculty

      A member of the 3-person search committee for a composition specialist tenure-stream faculty member

    • Sept 2012 to  Aug 2013 Tenure and Promotion Committee

      A member of the 5-person committee that anually reviews work by faculty seeking tenure and/or promotion and makes recommendations to the chair and beyond.

    • Sept 2011 to  Aug 2012 Tenure and Promotion Committee

      A member of the 5-person committee that anually reviews work by faculty seeking tenure and/or promotion and makes recommendations to the chair and beyond.

    • Sept 2005 to  Aug 2011 Office of Information Technology Compliance Committee

      The OIT compliance contact for the department.

    • Sept 2008 to  Aug 2011 Information Security Working Group

      ISWG contact for the department.

    • Sept 2004 to  Aug 2009 English Department Scholarships and Awards Committee

      The Scholarships and Awards Committee oversees the distribution of the many scholarships and awards offered through the English Department.

    • Sept 2005 to  Aug 2011 Graduate Teaching Assistant Committee

      This committee supports and reviews the department's graduate teaching assistants.

    • Jan 2014 to  Mar 2014 The UTA Selection Committee for the UT Board of Regents 2012 Award for Excellence in the Humanities

      In February 2012, The University of Texas System Board of Regents approved the establishment of the Regents’ Outstanding Student Awards in Arts and Humanities to recognize student achievement in these areas. To acknowledge student achievement in the arts and humanities, The University of Texas System Board of Regents will commend outstanding students and student groups excelling in one of three areas: the musical arts, the visual arts, and creative writing.

      The specific area for recognition will vary each year. The awards program is designed to provide a framework that fosters excellence in student performance, rewards outstanding students, stimulates the arts and humanities, and promotes continuous quality in education.

      In 2014, The UT System Board of Regents awarded the Regents’ Outstanding Student Awards in Creative Writing.

      Among the three winners selected, Samantha Jones, a student at The University of Texas at Arlington, was selected for excellence in short fiction.

    • Jan 2016 to  May 2016 CHAIR: Digital Humanities Search Committee

      Chair of the committee for a new hire Digital Humanities.

  • Volunteered
    • Mar 2015 to  Mar 2015 Annual Celebration of Excellence by Students (ACES) Judge

      "The ACES symposium is a university-wide event that showcases the best of our students’ research and creativity. Undergraduate and graduate students work with faculty mentors in their disciplines to write and submit abstracts for the competition. The approved abstracts are then turned into oral presentations or posters to be presented at the symposium. Judges utilize a rubric to evaluate presentations and posters. The highest rated presentations and posters are selected to receive awards which are presented on the evening of the symposium."

Other Service Activities

  • Talks and Readings
    • May 2013 Scholarship and Poetry

      Invited Lecturer.  Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, April 24-25, 2008.

      Visiting poet and lecturer.  Newman University, Wichita, Kansas, October 22-23, 2003.

      Visiting poet.  Tareleton State University Reader Series, Stevenville, Texas, February 28, 2002.

      Featured poet. Craft, Critque, Culture:  An Interdisciplinary Conference on Writing in the Academy, Iowa, September 29-October 1, 2000.

      Guest poet.  Forbidden Passage:  Old Dominion University's 19th Annual Literary Festival, Norfolk, Virginia, Fall 1996.

      Featured poet.  Third Annual Conference in the English Disciplines, Norfolk, Virginia, Spring 1995.

      Featured poet with Henry Taylor.  Visiting Writers Series, Denton, Texas, Spring 1994.