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Yuan B Peng

Name

[Peng, Yuan B]
  • Professor, Department of Psychology

Biography

Bachelor of Medicine (1986), West China University of Medical Sciences

PhD in Neuroscience (1996),  University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston

Postdoctoral Fellow (1996 - 1998), Department of Neurosurgery, Johns Hopkins Medical Institute

Postdoctoral Fellow (1998 -2001), National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, NIH

Assistant Professor (2001 -2007), Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Arlington

Associate Professor (2007 - 2014), Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Arlington

Professor (2014 - ), Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Arlington

Professional Preparation

    • 1996 Postdoctoral Fellow in PainJohns Hopkins Medical Institute
    • 1998 Postdoctoral Fellow in Neuroscience / painDepartment of Health and Human Services (DHHS)  National Institutes of Health (NIH)  National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR)

Appointments

    • Sept 2014 to Present Professor
      Uiversity of Texas at Arlington
    • Sept 2007 to Aug 2014 Assoc Prof
      University of Texas at Arlington
    • Jan 2001 to Jan 2007 Assist Professor
      University of Texas at Arlington

Research and Expertise

  • Nociception/Pain: Using electrophysiological techniques to record signals from both peripheral and central nervous system

    Single cell recording and local field potential recording in both peripheral and central nervous system, anesthetized and freely moving animals.

Publications

      Conference Proceeding 2014
      • Cuong M. Nguyen, Smitha Rao, Hung Cao, Ailing Li, Yuan Bo Peng, and J.-C. Chiao, Miniature Neurotransmitter Sensors Featured with Iridium Oxide Nanorods. IEEE Sensors, Valencia, Spain, November 2-5, 2014.

        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2014
      • Perry N. Fuchs, Yuan Bo Peng, Jessica A. Boyette-Davis, and Megan L. Uhelski: The Anterior Cingulate Cortex and Pain Processing. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, 2014 May 8: 1-10. 

        {Journal Article }

      Conference Paper 2013
      • Shariq M. Athar, Aydin Farajidavar, Christopher E. Hagains, Yuan B. Peng, J.-C. Chiao: Wireless Electrocorticographic Signal Acquisition of Thermal Pain Stimulus in Freely Behaving Rats. SBEC, 2011.
        {Conference Paper }
      2013
      • Aydin Farajidavar, Ramin M. Askari, Christopher E. Hagains, Yuan B. Peng, J.-C. Chiao: Detecting Graded Mechanical Stimuli in Thalamic Ventral Posterior Nucleus. SBEC, 2011.
        {Conference Paper }
      2013
      • Hung Cao, Cuong M. Nguyen, Ai-Ling Li, Yuan Bo Peng, and J.-C. Chiao: Fabrication of a flexible probe for neurotransmitters sensing. SBEC, 2011
        {Conference Paper }

      Conference Paper 2012
      • Kelly Bullock, Ai-Ling Li, Chao Zuo, Yang Wang, Xiaofei Yang, J.-C. Chiao, <strong>Yuan B. Peng</strong>: Effect of primary somatosensory cortex stimulation on mechanical and thermal thresholds in freely moving rats. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2012.
        {Conference Paper }
      2012
      • Jiny Sibi, Ai-Ling Li, Chao Zuo, Yang Wang, Xiaofei Yang, J.-C. Chiao, Yuan B. Peng: Stimulation of ventral tegmental area increases mechanical pain threshold and thermal pain latency in rats. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2012.
        {Conference Paper }
      2012
      • Ai-Ling Li, Chao Zuo, Yang Wang, Xiaofei Yang, J.-C. Chiao, Yuan B. Peng: Stimulation of the ventral tegmental area inhibits spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal activity. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2012.
        {Conference Paper }

      Journal Article 2012
      • Ruben Najera, Jiny E Sibi, Ai-Ling Li, Christopher McNabb, Perry N Fuchs, Yuan B Peng, Heekyeong Park: Deep Brain Stimulation of Entorhinal Cortex Enhances Spatial Memory in Rats. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2012.
        {Journal Article }
      2012
      • He J-W, Tian F, Liu H, Peng YB: Cerebrovascular Responses of the Rat Brain to Noxious Stimuli as Examined by Functional Near Infrared Whole Brain Imaging. Journal of Neurophysiology, 107: 2853-2865, 2012.
        {Journal Article }
      2012
      • Jyoti Puri, Priya Vinothini, Jayne Reuben, Larry L. Bellinger, Li Ailing, Peng YB and Phillip R. Kramer: Reduced GABAA receptor alpha6 expression in the trigeminal ganglion alters inflammatory TMJ hypersensitivity. Neuroscience. Jun 28;213:179-90, 2012
        {Journal Article }
      2012
      • Hung Cao, Ai-Ling Li, Cuong M. Nguyen, Yuan-Bo Peng, and Jung-Chih Chiao: An integrated flexible implantable micro-probe for sensing neurotransmitters. IEEE Sensors Journal, 12(5):1618-1624, 2012.
        {Journal Article }
      2012
      • Zuo C, Yang X, Wang Y, Hagains CE, Li AL, Peng YB, Chiao JC. A digital wireless system for closed-loop inhibition of nociceptive signals. J Neural Eng. 2012 Oct;9(5):056010. Epub 2012 Sep 6.
        {Journal Article }
      2012
      • Farajidavar A, Hagains CE, Peng YB, Chiao JC. A closed loop feedback system for automatic detection and inhibition of mechano-nociceptive neural activity. IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng. 2012 Jul;20(4):478-87.
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2011
      • Hagains CE, Senapati AK, Huntington PJ, and Peng YB: Inhibition of spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal activity by stimulation of the cerebellum. J Neurophysiol. 106(5):2515-22, 2011
        {Journal Article }
      2011
      • Lobanov OV and Peng YB: Differential contribution of electrically-evoked dorsal root reflex to peripheral vasodilatation and plasma extravasation. Journal of Neuroinflammation, 8:20, 2011
        {Journal Article }
      2011
      • Hagains CE, He J-W, Chiao J-C, Peng YB: Septal stimulation inhibits spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal activity in rat. Brain Research, 1382: 189-197, 2011.
        {Journal Article }
      2011
      • Sharma V, He J-W, Narvenkar S, Peng YB, Liu H: Quantification of light reflectance spectroscopy and its application: Determination of hemodynamics on the rat spinal cord and brain induced by electrical stimulation. NeuroImage, 2011.
        {Journal Article }
      2011
      • He J-W, Kashyap D, Trevino LA, Liu H, Peng YB: Simultaneous Absolute Measures of Glabrous Skin Hemodynamics and Light Scattering Change in Responses to Formalin Injection in Rats. Neuroscience Letters, 2011; 492:59-63.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Paper 2011
      • Christopher E. Hagains, Chao Zuo, Yang Wang, Ai-Ling Li, Xiaofei Yang, J.-C. Chiao, Yuan B. Peng: A digital wireless closed-loop system for inhibition of nociceptive signals. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2011.
        {Conference Paper }
      2011
      • Ai-Ling Li, Christopher E Hagains, Yuan B Peng: Formalin Injection Does Not Increase Contralateral Cutaneous Blood Perfusion under Pre-inflammatory Condition. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2011.
        {Conference Paper }

      Conference Proceeding 2011
      • Farajidavar A, McCorkle PG, Wiggins TW, Smitha M.N. Rao, Hagains CE, Peng YB, Seifert J, Romero M, O'Grady G, Cheng L, Sparagana S, Delgado M, Tang T-S, Abell T, and Chiao J-C: A Miniature Power-Efficient Bidirectional Telemetric Platform for in-vivo Acquisition of Electrophysiological Signals. International Microwave Symposium, Baltimore MD, June 5-10, 2011
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Journal Article 2010
      • H. Cao, Y.-B. Peng, and J.-C. Chiao: An Integrated Flexible Implantable L-glutamate Sensor, The 9th Annual IEEE Conference on Sensors, Big Island of Hawaii, Nov. 1-4, 2010.
        {Journal Article }
      2010
      • J-W HPM Peng YB. 2010. Biphasic effects of the anterior cingulate cortex stimulation on glabrous skin blood flow in rats. Brain Research 1356:32-43.
        {Journal Article }
      2010
      • Rattakorn, P., Peng, Y. B., & Kim, S. B. (2010). An effective clustering procedure of neuronal response profiles in graded thermal stimulation. Expert Systems with Applications, 37, 5818-5826.
        {Journal Article }
      2010
      • Hagains CE, Kachlic LA, J-W LH, Peng YB. 2010. Contributions of Dorsal Root Reflex and Axonal Reflex to Formalin-Induced Inflammation. Brain Research 1359:90-7.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Proceeding 2010
      • Farajidavar A, Hagains CE, Peng YB, Behbehani K, Chiao J-C: Recognition and Inhibition of Dorsal Horn Nociceptive Signals within a Closed-loop System. IEEE EMBS, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc. 2010;1:1535-8.
        {Conference Proceeding }

      Conference Paper 2010
      • Farajidavar A, Hagains CE, Peng YB, Chiao J-C: Investigating the power spectral density as a method for quantifying neuronal signals for pain study. BMES, Austin, 2010.
        {Conference Paper }
      2010
      • Li AL, He JW, Hagains CE, Peng YB: Comparing effect of capsaicin and formalin on bilateral cutaneous blood perfusion. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2010.
        {Conference Paper }
      2010
      • Ji Wei He, Sweta Narvenkar, Hanli Liu, Yuan Bo Peng: Hemodynamic and light scattering changes of the spinal cord and primary somatosensory cortex in responses to innocuous and noxious stimuli. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2010.
        {Conference Paper }
      2010
      • Sharma V, He J-W, Narvenkar S, Peng YB, Liu H: Multi-Channel, Light Reflectance Spectroscopy for Fast Detection of Hemodynamic Changes on the Spinal Cord and Brain Induced by Electrical Stimulations in Rats. Optical Society of America, Miami, 2010.
        {Conference Paper }
      2010
      • Farajidavar A, Hagains CE, Peng YB, Chiao J-C: Real-time processing to recognize dorsal horn nociceptive signals. IEEE International Conference on Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing, March 14-19, 2010, Dallas.
        {Conference Paper }

      Conference Paper 2009
      • He J-W, Tian F, Liu H, Peng YB: Comparisons of the brain fNIR signals between with and without scalp in responses to peripheral stimuli. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 74.4/X11, 2009.
        {Conference Paper }
      2009
      • Hagains CE, Huntington PJ, Senapati AK, Wilson HD, Fuchs PN, Liu H, Peng YB: Effects of spinal nerve ligation on cutaneous blood flow in rats. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 561.8/DD6, 2009.
        {Conference Paper }
      2009
      • Herath PM, Hagains CE, He J-W, Davis MA, Liu H, Peng YB: The role of periaqueductal gray induced dorsal root reflexes in cutaneous neurogenic inflammation. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 268.19/BB25, 2009.
        {Conference Paper }
      2009
      • Davis MA, Peng YB: Capsaicin-evoked dorsal root reflex does not produce peripheral cutaneous plasma extravasation. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 268.8/BB14, 2009.
        {Conference Paper }
      2009
      • Farajidavar A, Hagains CE, Peng YB, Chiao J-C: Real-time automatic recognition of pain signals. BMES 2009, Pittsburgh, Oct. 7–10, 2009.
        {Conference Paper }
      2009
      • Farajidavar A, Hagains CE, Peng YB, Chiao J-C: Finding optimum electrical stimulation parameters to inhibit pain. BMES 2009, Pittsburgh, Oct. 7–10, 2009.
        {Conference Paper }
      2009
      • Cao H, Peng YB, Chiao J-C:  Flexible implantable l-glutamate sensors for neuroactivity studies. BMES 2009, Pittsburgh, Oct. 7–10, 2009.
        {Conference Paper }
      2009
      • Vikrant Sharma, Jiwei He, Sweta narvenkar, Dheerendra Kashyap, Yuan Bo Peng, and Hanli Liu, “Quantification of Optical Properties of Tissue and Its Application to Study of Pain Mechanism in Rats,” oral presentation given in SPIE, Photonics West, BiOS Biomedical Optics Symposium, January 24-29, 2009, San Jose, California. 
        {Conference Paper }
      2009
      • Rattakorn P, Peng YB, Kim SB: Novel clustering strategy of neuronal response profiles in graded thermal stimulation, Proceedings of the 2009 Industrial Engineering Research Conference, Miami, May 30 – June 3, 2009.
        {Conference Paper }
      2009
      • Farajidavar A, Hagains CE, Peng YB, Chiao J-C: Inhibition of dorsal horn nociceptive activities by a closed loop feedback system. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 361.11/BB37, 2009.
        {Conference Paper }

      Conference Paper 2008
      • Herath PM, Hagains CE, Kachlic LA, He J-W, Liu H, Peng YB: Increased blood perfusion after GABA evoked dorsal root reflex. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2008.
        {Conference Paper }
      2008
      • Farajidavar A, He J-W, Hsu L-C, Peng YB, Chiao J-C: Investigation of Pain Signals in Spinal Cord Using Interspike Interval Features. Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting, St. Louis, MO, 2008.
        {Conference Paper }
      2008
      • He J-W, Hsu L-C, Ativanichayaphong T, Farajidavar A, Peng YB, Chiao J-C: Progress Report on the Integrative Sensor and Stimulator System. Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting, St. Louis, MO, 2008.
        {Conference Paper }
      2008
      • Hagains CE, Ativanichayaphong T, He J-W, Hsu L-C, Peng YB, Chiao J-C: Self-stimulation in Rats Using a Wireless Device. Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting, St. Louis, MO, 2008.
        {Conference Paper }
      2008
      • Rattakorn P, Kim SB, Peng YB: Functional Data Mining in Neurostimulation Data. IERC 2008 Conference, Vancouver, British Columbia , May, 17-20, 2008.
        {Conference Paper }
      2008
      • Rattakorn P, Kim SB, Peng YB: Clustering of Neuronal Response Profiles in Graded Thermal Stimulation. Proceedings of the 2008 Industrial Engineering Research Conference, IERC 2008 Conference, Vancouver, British Columbia , May, 17-20, 2008.
        {Conference Paper }
      2008
      • Davis MA, Hagains CE, He J-W, Herath PM, Kachlic LA, Liu H, Chiao J-C, Peng YB: Cutaneous neurogenic inflammation evoked by direct capsaicin application at the dorsal root. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2008.
        {Conference Paper }
      2008
      • He J-W, Kaul A, Tian F, Liu H, Peng YB: Detection of hemodynamic changes in the brain by near infrared spectroscopy during mechanical chemical noxious stimuli. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2008.
        {Conference Paper }
      2008
      • Hagains CE, He J-W, Chiao J-C, Peng YB: Septal stimulation inhibits spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal activity in rat. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2008.
        {Conference Paper }

      Journal Article 2008
      • Liu, H., Radhakrishnan, H., Senapati, A. K., Hagains, C. E., & Peng, Y. B. (2008, March). Near infrared and visible spectroscopic measurements to detect changes in light scattering and hemoglobin oxygen saturation from rat spinal cord during peripheral stimulation. Neuroimage, 40(1), 217-27.
        {Journal Article }
      2008
      • Ativanichayaphong, T., He, J. W., Hagains, C. E., Peng, Y. B., & Chiao, J. C. (2008, January). A combined wireless neural stimulating and recording system for study of pain processing. J Neurosci Methods, 170(1), 25-34.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2007
      • Fuchs PN, and Peng YB: Lateral Thalamic Lesions, Pain Behavior in Animals. In Robert F. Schmidt and William D. Willis  (Eds) Encyclopedia of Pain, 1042-1044. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, 2007.
        {Book Chapter }
      2007
      • Su J, Liu H, Peng YB: A Dynamical Model of Fast Intrinsic Optical Signal of Neural Burstings. Advances in Cognitive Neurodynamics - Proceedings of the International Conference on Cognitive Neurodynamics, Eds: Rubin Wng, Fanji Gu and Enhua Shen, 2007.
        {Book Chapter }

      Conference Paper 2007
      • Rattakorn P,  Hagains CE, Ativanichayaphong T,  Chen V, Peng YB, Kim SB, Rosenberger J, Chiao J-C: Statistical data mining of a wireless neuronal recording and stimulation system. Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Fall Meeting, 2007
        {Conference Paper }
      2007
      • Rattakorn P, Hagains CE, Ativanichayaphong T, Chen VCP, Peng YB, Kim SB, Rosenberger JM, and Chiao JC: Statistical data mining of a wireless neuronal recording and stimulation system. Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting, 2007.
        {Conference Paper }
      2007
      • Rattakorn P, Hagains CE, Ativanichayaphong T, Chen VCP, Peng YB, Kim SB, Rosenberger JM, and Chiao JC: Data Mining in a Wireless Neurostimulation System for Pain Reduction. Workshop on Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining (WAID), 2007.
        {Conference Paper }
      2007
      • Su J, Liu H, Peng YB: A Dynamical Model of Fast Intrinsic Optical Signal of Neural Burstings. the 1st International Conference on Cognitive Neurodynamics (ICCN), 2007.
        {Conference Paper }
      2007
      • He J-W, Ativanichayaphong T, Chiao J-C, Hagains CE, Kachlic LA, and Peng YB: Efficiency of an integrative sensor and stimulator system in inhibition of spinal dorsal horn neurons by stimulation of the anterior cingulate cortex. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2007.
        {Conference Paper }
      2007
      • Kachlic LA, He J-W, Hagains CE, Liu H, and Peng YB: The role of the dorsal root reflexes on blood perfusion during inflammatory pain. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2007.
        {Conference Paper }
      2007
      • Hagains CE, Kachlic LA, He J-W, Liu H, and Peng YB: Contributions of Dorsal Root Reflex and Axonal Reflex to Neurogenic Inflammation. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2007.
        {Conference Paper }
      2007
      • Ativanichayaphong T, He J-W, Hagains CE, Peng YB, Chiao J-C: A progress report on an integrated neurosensor and neurostimulator system for pain management. Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Fall Meeting, 2007
        {Conference Paper }

      Journal Article 2007
      • Gatchel, R. J., Peng, Y. B., Peters, M. L., Fuchs, P. N., & Turk, D. (2007, July). The biopsychosocial approach to chronic pain: scientific advances and future directions. Psychol Bull., 133(4), 581-624.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2006
      • Gatchel RJ and Peng YB: Biopsychosocial Management Of Chronic Pain. In J.A. Trafton and W. P. Gordon (Eds.) Best Practices in the Behavioral Management of Chronic Disease, Volume I, Chapter 14,353-370. Los Altos, CA. Institute for Disease Management, 2006.
        {Book Chapter }

      Conference Paper 2006
      • Hagains CE, Senapati AK, Huntington PJ, and Peng YB: Inhibition of spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal activity by stimulation of the cerebellum. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2006.
        {Conference Paper }
      2006
      • He J-W, Fuchs PN, and Peng YB: Stimulation of anterior cingulate cortex inhibits spinal dorsal horn neuron response to peripheral formalin injection. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2006.
        {Conference Paper }
      2006
      • Lobanov OV and Peng YB: Differential contribution of electrically-evoked dorsal root reflex to peripheral vasodilatation and plasma extravasation. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 51.11, 2006.
        {Conference Paper }
      2006
      • Ativanichayaphong T, He J-W, Peng YB, and Chiao1J-C: Development of integrative wireless sensor and stimulator for modulating neuronal activities. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2006.
        {Conference Paper }
      2006
      • Radhakrishnan H, Liu H,Senapati AK, Hagains CE, and Peng YB: Detection of changes in rat spinal cord due to peripheral stimulation using NIR reflectance spectroscopy. Optical Society of America, 2006
        {Conference Paper }
      2006
      • Geol M, Radhakrishnan H, Liu H,and Peng YB: In vivo detection of intrinsic optical signal changes in rat spinal cord due to formalin using a multi-wavelength CCD camera. Optical Society of America, 2006
        {Conference Paper }

      Journal Article 2006
      • LaGraize, S. C., Borzan, J., Peng, Y. B., & Fuchs, P. N. (2006, January). Selective regulation of pain affect following activation of the opioid anterior cingulate cortex system. Exp Neurol, 197(1), 22-30.
        {Journal Article }
      2006
      • Radhakrishnan, H., Liu, H., Senapati, A. K., & Peng, Y. B. (2006, July). Determination of hemoglobin oxygen saturation in rat sciatic nerve by in vivo near infrared spectroscopy. Brain Res., 1098(1), 86-93.
        {Journal Article }

      Book Chapter 2005
      • Peng YB, Fuchs PN, and Gatchel RJ: Chronic Pain:  The Diathesis-Stress Model. In B.B. Arnetz & R. Ekman (Eds.) Stress.  Page: 333-341. Germany:  Wiley-VCH Verlag. 2005.
        {Book Chapter }

      Conference Paper 2005
      • Peng YB, Fuchs PN,LaGraize SC, Borzan J, and Senapati AK: Increased Behavioral and Electrophysiological Responses to Mechanical Stimuli in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE), Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2005.
        {Conference Paper }
      2005
      • Harsha Radhakrishnan, Arun K Senapati, Dheerendra R Kashyap, Yuan B Peng, and  Hanli Liu, “NIR reflectance spectroscopy as a novel method to detect demyelination in rat sciatic nerve in-vivo,” presented in  SPIE, Photonics West, San Jose, CA, Jan. 23-27, 2005.
        {Conference Paper }
      2005
      • Peng YB, Fuchs PN,Senapati AK, Radhakrishnan H, and Liu H: Detection of axonal degeneration after spinal nerve ligation by near infrared spectroscopy. IASP, Sydney, 2005.
        {Conference Paper }
      2005
      • R. Lundy, T. Cleland, L. Hurley, Y.B. Peng: Neuromodulation in Sensory Systems. Winter Conference on Brain Research, 2005.
        {Conference Paper }

      Journal Article 2005
      • Senapati, A. K., Radhakrishnan, H., Liu, H., & Peng, Y. B. (2005). Detection of degeneration in rat sciatic nerve by in vivo near infrared spectroscopy. Brain Res Brain Res Protoc., 14(2), 119-125.
        {Journal Article }
      2005
      • Senapati, A. K., Huntington, P. J., & Peng, Y. B. (2005). Spinal dorsal horn neuron response to mechanical stimuli is decreased by electrical stimulation of the primary motor cortex. Brain Res., 1036(1-2), 173-179.
        {Journal Article }
      2005
      • Senapati, A. K., Lagraize, S. C., Huntington, P. J., Wilson, H. D., Fuchs, P. N., & Peng, Y. B. (2005, July). Electrical stimulation of the anterior cingulate cortex reduces responses of rat dorsal horn neurons to mechanical stimuli. J Neurophysiol., 94(1), 845-51.
        {Journal Article }
      2005
      • Senapati, A. K., Huntington, P. J., Lagraize, S. C., Wilson, H. D., Fuchs, P. N., & Peng, Y. B. (2005, September). Electrical stimulation of the primary somatosensory cortex inhibits spinal dorsal horn neuron activity. Brain Res., 1057(1-2), 134-40.
        {Journal Article }
      2005
      • Radhakrishnan, H., Senapati, A. K., Kashyap, D., Peng, Y. B., & Liu, H. (2005, September). Light scattering from rat nervous system measured in vivo by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. J Biomed Opt., 10(5), 051405.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Paper 2004
      • Hilary D Wilson, Arun K Senapati, Paula J Huntington, Stacey C LaGraize, Perry N Fuchs, Yuan B Peng: Focal electrical stimulation of the anterior cingulate cortex attenuates dorsal horn neuron responses to mechanical stimuli in rat. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2004.
        {Conference Paper }
      2004
      • Yuan B Peng, Arun K Senapati, Paula J Huntington, Stacey C LaGraize, Hilary D Wilson: Spinal dorsal horn neuron response to mechanical stimuli is decreased by electrical stimulation of the primary motor cortex. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2004.
        {Conference Paper }
      2004
      • Paula J Huntington, Arun K Senapati, Stacey C LaGraize, Hilary D Wilson, Yuan B Peng: Spinal dorsal horn neuron response to mechanical stimuli is decreased by electrical stimulation of the primary somatosensory cortex. Society for Neuroscience Abstract, 2004.
        {Conference Paper }
      2004
      • Yuan B Peng, Arun K Senapati, Stacey C LaGraize, Hilary Waldo, Perry N Fuchs: Electrical stimulation of the anterior cingulate cortex reduces responses of rat dorsal horn neurons to mechanical stimuli. American Pain Society Annual Meeting, Vancouver, 2004.
        {Conference Paper }
      2004
      • Arun K Senapati, Stacey C LaGraize, Hilary Waldo, Perry N Fuchs, Yuan B Peng: Spinal dorsal horn neuron response to mechanical stimuli is decreased by electrical stimulation of the primary motor and somatosensory cortices. American Pain Society Annual Meeting, Vancouver, 2004.
        {Conference Paper }
      2004
      • LaGrazia SC, Borzan J, Waldo H, Peng YB, and Fuchs PN: Morphine and GABA administration in the rostral anterior cingulated cortex alters supraspinal processing of nociception. American Pain Society Annual Meeting, Vancouver, 2004.
        {Conference Paper }

      Conference Paper 2003
      • Peng YB, and Fuchs PN:Dorsal root has a faster conduction velocity than the peripheral nerve. Society For Neuroscience Abstract, 2003.
        {Conference Paper }
      2003
      • Borzan J, LaGrazia SC, Peng YB, and Fuchs PN:Testosterone facilitates morphine antinociception in carrageenan induced inflammatory pain. Society For Neuroscience Abstract, 2003.
        {Conference Paper }
      2003
      • LaGrazia SC, Borzan J, Peng YB, and Fuchs PN:Effect of GABA microinjection in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex on supraspinal processing of nociception. Society For Neuroscience Abstract, 2003.
        {Conference Paper }

      Journal Article 2003
      • Peng YB, Ling QD, Ruda MA, Kenshalo, DR. Jr. Electrophysiological changes of the adult rat dorsal horn neuron activities and cord dorsum potentials after neonatal persistent pain. J Neurophysiol 90: 73-80, 2003.
        {Journal Article }
      2003
      • Peng YB, Kenshalo DR, Gracely RH: Periaqueductal gray-evoked dorsal root reflex is frequency dependent. Brain Res. 976: 217-226, 2003.
        {Journal Article }
      2003
      • Peng YB, Ringkamp M, Meyer RA, and Campbell JN: Fatigue and paradoxical enhancement of heat response in C-fiber nociceptors from cross-modal excitation. J Neuroscience J Neurosci. 23(11):4766-74, 2003.
        {Journal Article }

      Conference Paper 2002
      • LaGrazia SC, Borzan J, Peng YB, and Fuchs PN: Morphine injection into the anterior cingulate cortex selectively modulates pain affect. 10th World Congress on Pain Abstract: 421-P55, pp143, 2002.
        {Conference Paper }
      2002
      • Borzan J, LaGrazia SC, Fuchs PN, and Peng YB:Dorsal horn neuron response patterns to graded heat stimuli in rat. Society For Neuroscience Abstract, 2002.
        {Conference Paper }
      2002
      • LaGrazia SC, Borzan J, King VA, Peng YB, and Fuchs PN:Low dose systemic morphine selectively modulates pain affect. Society For Neuroscience Abstract, 2002.
        {Conference Paper }

      Journal Article 2001
      • Ringkamp M, Peng YB, Wu G, Campbell JN, and Meyer RA: Capsaicin responses in heat-sensitive and heat-insensitive A-fiber nociceptors. J. Neurosci. 21(12): 4460-8, 2001.
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 2000
      • Peng YB, Wu J, Willis WD, Kenshalo D: GABAA and 5-HT3 receptors are involved in dorsal root reflexes: possible role in periaqueductal gray descending inhibition. J. Neurophysiol. 86:49-58, 2000.
        {Journal Article }
      2000
      • Ruda MA, Ling QD. Hohmann AG, Peng YB and Tachibana T. Neonatal peripheral inflammation alters nociceptive neuronal circuits. Science 289: 628-630, 2000.
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1999
      • Peng YB, Ringkamp M, Campbell JN, and Meyer RA: Electrophysiological assessment of the cutaneous arborization of A-delta fiber nociceptors. J. Neurophysiol. 82: 1164-1177, 1999.
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1997
      • Peng YB, Lin Q, and Willis WD: Involvement of protein kinase C in responses of rat dorsal horn neurons to mechanical stimuli and PAG descending inhibition. Exp Brain Res 114: 561-570, 1997.
        {Journal Article }

      Journal Article 1996
      • Peng YB, Lin Q, and Willis WD. The role of 5-HT3 receptors in periaqueductal gray-induced inhibition of nociceptive dorsal horn neurons in rat. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 276: 116-124, 1996.
        {Journal Article }
      1996
      • Peng YB, Lin Q, and Willis WD: Involvement of Alpha2-adrenoceptors in the periaqueductal gray-induced inhibition of dorsal horn cell activity in rats. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 278:125-135, 1996.
        {Journal Article }
      1996
      • Peng YB, Lin Q, and Willis WD: Effects of GABA and glycine antagonists on the activity and PAG-induced inhibition of rat dorsal horn neurons. Brain Res 736: 189-201, 1996.
        {Journal Article }

Support & Funding

This data is entered manually by the author of the profile and may duplicate data in the Sponsored Projects section.
    • May 2012 to Apr 2013 1. Development Development of A Wireless Implantable Closed-Loop Device for Major Depressive Disorder sponsored by  - $105900

Courses

      • PSYC 5334-001 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of the human physiology that is categorized in 15 sections and 84 Chapters (see Contents in Appendix). We will not be able to cover all of them. Some of them will be covered by different courses, such as Neuroscience, Immunology and Endocrinology (see sections that are highlighted in gray). Students are expected to learn how the human body works and what the underlying mechanisms that control the physiological responses are. In case of damage to these systems, what will happen to the body as a whole and the impact on behaviors? Topics (tentative) will include:

        UNIT I: Introduction to Physiology: The Cell and General Physiology

        UNIT II: Membrane Physiology, Nerve, and Muscle

        UNIT III: The Heart

        UNIT IV: The Circulation

        UNIT V: The Body Fluids and Kidneys

        UNIT VI: Blood Cells, Immunity, and Blood Clotting

        UNIT VII: Respiration

        UNIT XII: Gastrointestinal Physiology

        UNIT XIII: Metabolism and Temperature Regulation

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2019 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 3322-002 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of the behavior that can be examined at the level of individual nerve cells. Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what are the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior. Topics will include: neurobiology of behavior, cell and molecular biology of the neuron, elementary interactions between neurons-synaptic transmission, perception, movement, and development of the nervous system.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 5333-001 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

        Course Description: This course will provide a comprehensive review of the behavior that can be examined at the level of individual nerve cells.

        Course Learning Goals/Objectives:  Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what are the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior. Topics will include: neurobiology of behavior, cell and molecular biology of the neuron, elementary interactions between neurons-synaptic transmission, perception, movement, and development of the nervous system. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 5334-001 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of the human physiology that is categorized in 15 sections and 84 Chapters (see Contents in Appendix). We will not be able to cover all of them. Some of them will be covered by different courses, such as Neuroscience, Immunology and Endocrinology (see sections that are highlighted in gray). Students are expected to learn how the human body works and what the underlying mechanisms that control the physiological responses are. In case of damage to these systems, what will happen to the body as a whole and the impact on behaviors? Topics (tentative) will include:

        UNIT I: Introduction to Physiology: The Cell and General Physiology

        UNIT II: Membrane Physiology, Nerve, and Muscle

        UNIT III: The Heart

        UNIT IV: The Circulation

        UNIT V: The Body Fluids and Kidneys

        UNIT VI: Blood Cells, Immunity, and Blood Clotting

        UNIT VII: Respiration

        UNIT XII: Gastrointestinal Physiology

        UNIT XIII: Metabolism and Temperature Regulation

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2018 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 3322-002 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of the behavior that can be examined at the level of individual nerve cells. Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what are the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior. Topics will include: neurobiology of behavior, cell and molecular biology of the neuron, elementary interactions between neurons-synaptic transmission, perception, movement, and development of the nervous system.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 5333-001 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

        Course Description: This course will provide a comprehensive review of the behavior that can be examined at the level of individual nerve cells.

        Course Learning Goals/Objectives:  Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what are the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior. Topics will include: neurobiology of behavior, cell and molecular biology of the neuron, elementary interactions between neurons-synaptic transmission, perception, movement, and development of the nervous system. 

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 5334-001 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of the human physiology that is categorized in 15 sections and 84 Chapters (see Contents in Appendix). We will not be able to cover all of them. Some of them will be covered by different courses, such as Neuroscience, Immunology and Endocrinology (see sections that are highlighted in gray).

        Course Learning Goals/Objectives:  Students are expected to learn how the human body works and what the underlying mechanisms that control the physiological responses are. In case of damage to these systems, what will happen to the body as a whole and the impact on behaviors? Topics (tentative) will include:

        UNIT I: Introduction to Physiology: The Cell and General Physiology

        UNIT II: Membrane Physiology, Nerve, and Muscle

        UNIT III: The Heart

        UNIT IV: The Circulation

        UNIT V: The Body Fluids and Kidneys

        UNIT VI: Blood Cells, Immunity, and Blood Clotting

        UNIT VII: Respiration

        UNIT XII: Gastrointestinal Physiology

        UNIT XIII: Metabolism and Temperature Regulation

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2017 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 3322-003 Brain and Behavior

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of the behavior that can be examined at the level of individual nerve cells. Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what are the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior. Topics will include: neurobiology of behavior, cell and molecular biology of the neuron, elementary interactions between neurons-synaptic transmission, perception, movement, and development of the nervous system.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • PSYC 5333-001 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of the behavior that can be examined at the level of individual nerve cells. Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what are the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior. Topics will include: neurobiology of behavior, cell and molecular biology of the neuron, elementary interactions between neurons-synaptic transmission, perception, movement, and development of the nervous system.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2016 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 6101-001 PROSEMINAR IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

        This course will provide the graduate students and faculty in the health psychology/neuroscience program with an opportunity to discuss information about the program, professional issues, and current research. Various aspects of professional topics such as ethical conduct, publishing, and grant-writing will be discussed most semesters from different angles to help enrich graduate students’ training.  The main goals of the course are: (1) To provide a forum in which students can be introduced and to discuss issues related to their future careers as professionals, and (2) To provide graduate students with an opportunity to present research ideas and/or findings from their own work and receive helpful feedback.

        The learning objectives are:

        To become familiar with the multiple perspectives on research in the area of health psychology/neuroscience.

        To understand the various facets of research and professional issues in psychology health psychology/neuroscience.

        To identify and understand the ethical considerations in the practice of psychological research.

        To develop the skills necessary to become an effective public speaker.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 3322-003 Brain and Behavior

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of physiological processes that underlie animal and human behavior.

        Student Learning Outcomes:  Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior are. Topics will include: anatomical structure, molecular basis, sensory and motor systems, neurotransmitters, control of hunger, thirst, temperature, emotional disorders and schizophrenia, etc.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours1 Document
      • PSYC 6101-001 PROSEMINAR IN HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

        This course will provide the graduate students and faculty in the health psychology/neuroscience program with an opportunity to discuss information about the program, professional issues, and current research. Various aspects of professional topics such as ethical conduct, publishing, and grant-writing will be discussed most semesters from different angles to help enrich graduate students’ training.  The main goals of the course are: (1) To provide a forum in which students can be introduced and to discuss issues related to their future careers as professionals, and (2) To provide graduate students with an opportunity to present research ideas and/or findings from their own work and receive helpful feedback.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 5333-001 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

        Course Description: This course will provide a comprehensive review of the behavior that can be examined at the level of individual nerve cells.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2015 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 5334-001 Human Physiology

        Course Description: This course will provide a comprehensive review of the human physiology that is categorized in 15 sections and 84 Chapters (see Contents in Appendix). We will not be able to cover all of them. Some of them will be covered by different courses, such as Neuroscience, Immunology and Endocrinology (see sections that are highlighted in gray).

        Course Learning Goals/Objectives:  Students are expected to learn how the human body works and what the underlying mechanisms that control the physiological responses are. In case of damage to these systems, what will happen to the body as a whole and the impact on behaviors? Topics (tentative) will include:

        UNIT I:       Introduction to Physiology: The Cell and General Physiology

        UNIT II:     Membrane Physiology, Nerve, and Muscle

        UNIT III:    The Heart

        UNIT IV:    The Circulation

        UNIT V:     The Body Fluids and Kidneys

        UNIT VI:    Blood Cells, Immunity, and Blood Clotting

        UNIT VII:   Respiration

        UNIT XII:   Gastrointestinal Physiology

        UNIT XIII: Metabolism and Temperature Regulation

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 6101-001 Proseminar for Health Psychology

        Course content

        This course will provide the graduate students and faculty in the health psychology/neuroscience program with an opportunity to discuss information about the program, professional issues, and current research. Various aspects of professional topics such as ethical conduct, publishing, and grant-writing will be discussed most semesters from different angles to help enrich graduate students’ training.  The main goals of the course are: (1) To provide a forum in which students can be introduced and to discuss issues related to their future careers as professionals, and (2) To provide graduate students with an opportunity to present research ideas and/or findings from their own work and receive helpful feedback.

        The learning objectives are:

        To become familiar with the multiple perspectives on research in the area of health psychology/neuroscience.

        To understand the various facets of research and professional issues in psychology health psychology/neuroscience.

        To identify and understand the ethical considerations in the practice of psychological research.

        To develop the skills necessary to become an effective public speaker.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 3322-001 Brain and Behavior

        Brain and Behavior is one of the biological foundation courses offered by the Department of Psychology. The textbook is Biological Psychology, 11th edition by James W. Kalat. This course will provide a comprehensive review of physiological processes that underlie animal and human behavior. Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior are. Topics will include: anatomical structure, molecular basis, sensory and motor systems, neurotransmitters, control of hunger, thirst, temperature, emotional disorders and schizophrenia, etc. The materials are introduced in the following chapters:

        Chapter 1 The major issues

        Chapter 2 Nerve cells and nerve impulses

        Chapter 3 Synapses

        Chapter 4 Anatomy of the nervous system

        Chapter 5 Development and plasticity of the brain

        Chapter 6 Vision

        Chapter 7 The other sensory systems

        Chapter 8 Movement

        Chapter 9 Wakefulness and sleep

        Chapter 10 Internal body states

        Chapter 12 Emotional behaviors

        Chapter 13 The biology of learning and memory

        Chapter 14 Cognitive Functions

        Chapter 15 Psychological disorders

        After finishing this course, students should know how our nervous system controls our behaviors: normal physiological and pathological behaviors. Some of them are contributed by genetic factors, at cellular, or molecular levels, neurotransmitters and their receptors; what determines our major sensory systems (touch, pain, smell, vision, taste, etc.) and how these information can be integrated to guide our movement; how our homeostasis of sleep, eating and drinking, and reproductive system work.

        This course is a simplified version of Neuroscience course.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 6101-001 Proseminar for Health Psychology

        This course will provide the graduate students and faculty in the health psychology/neuroscience program with an opportunity to discuss information about the program, professional issues, and current research. Various aspects of professional topics such as ethical conduct, publishing, and grant-writing will be discussed most semesters from different angles to help enrich graduate students’ training.  The main goals of the course are: (1) To provide a forum in which students can be introduced and to discuss issues related to their future careers as professionals, and (2) To provide graduate students with an opportunity to present research ideas and/or findings from their own work and receive helpful feedback.

        The learning objectives are:

        To become familiar with the multiple perspectives on research in the area of health psychology/neuroscience.

        To understand the various facets of research and professional issues in psychology health psychology/neuroscience.

        To identify and understand the ethical considerations in the practice of psychological research.

        To develop the skills necessary to become an effective public speaker.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2014 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 3322-001 Brain and Behavior

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of physiological processes that underlie animal and human behavior. Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior are. Topics will include: anatomical structure, molecular basis, sensory and motor systems, neurotransmitters, control of hunger, thirst, temperature, emotional disorders and schizophrenia, etc.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 5333-001 Behavioral Neuroscience

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of the behavior that can be examined at the level of individual nerve cells.  Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior are. Topics will include: neurobiology of behavior, cell and molecular biology of the neuron, elementary interactions between neurons-synaptic transmission, perception, movement, and development of the nervous system.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus Contact info & Office Hours
      • PSYC 3322-001 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR
        This course will provide a comprehensive review of physiological processes that underlie animal and human behavior.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • PSYC 5334-001 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
        Course Description: This course will provide a comprehensive review of the human physiology that is categorized in 15 sections and 84 Chapters (see Contents in Appendix). We will not be able to cover all of them. Some of them will be covered by different courses, such as Neuroscience, Immunology and Endocrinology (see sections that are highlighted in gray).
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2013 Download Syllabus
      • PSYC 3322-001 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of physiological processes that underlie animal and human behavior.

        Course Learning Goals/Objectives:Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior are. Topics will include: anatomical structure, molecular basis, sensory and motor systems, neurotransmitters, control of hunger, thirst, temperature, emotional disorders and schizophrenia, etc.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • PSYC 3322-001 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of physiological processes that underlie animal and human behavior.

        Course Learning Goals/Objectives:Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior are. Topics will include: anatomical structure, molecular basis, sensory and motor systems, neurotransmitters, control of hunger, thirst, temperature, emotional disorders and schizophrenia, etc.

        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2012 Download Syllabus
      • PSYC 3322-001 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • PSYC 5333-001 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
        No Description Provided.
        Fall - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • PSYC 5334-001 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
        No Description Provided.
        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2010
      • PSYC 5333-001 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of the behavior that can be examined at the level of individual nerve cells. Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what are the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior. Topics will include: neurobiology of behavior, cell and molecular biology of the neuron, elementary interactions between neurons-synaptic transmission, perception, movement, and development of the nervous system.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009
      • PSYC 3322-001 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of physiological processes that underlie animal and human behavior.Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior are. Topics will include: anatomical structure, molecular basis, sensory and motor systems, neurotransmitters, control of hunger, thirst, temperature, emotional disorders and schizophrenia, etc.Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior are. Topics will include: anatomical structure, molecular basis, sensory and motor systems, neurotransmitters, control of hunger, thirst, temperature, emotional disorders and schizophrenia, etc.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009
      • PSYC 3322-001 BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR

        This course will provide a comprehensive review of physiological processes that underlie animal and human behavior.Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior are. Topics will include: anatomical structure, molecular basis, sensory and motor systems, neurotransmitters, control of hunger, thirst, temperature, emotional disorders and schizophrenia, etc.Students are expected to learn how nervous system works and what the underlying neural mechanisms that control our behavior are. Topics will include: anatomical structure, molecular basis, sensory and motor systems, neurotransmitters, control of hunger, thirst, temperature, emotional disorders and schizophrenia, etc.

        Spring - Regular Academic Session - 2009