Browse Sponsored Projects

Your search matched 8484 Projects
Jul 2017 - Jun 2028
Industry/University Consortium in Hypoid and Bevel Gear Mesh and Dynamics sponsored by University of Cincinnati
  Industry/University Research Consortium in Hypoid and Bevel Gear Mesh and Dynamics
Sep 2022 - Aug 2027
Upward Bound#1 sponsored by U.S. Department of Education
The UTA UB Project will provide Participants with academic instruction, tutoring, and advising; information on financial aid programs; assistance in completing financial aid applications; financial literacy; and support for applying for college enrollment.
Moreover, Participants will be provided support for their diverse academic and non-cognitive needs to ensure that they persist, succeed and graduate from high school completing a rigorous secondary school program of study, enroll in college, and graduate with a college degree.
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Sep 2022 - Aug 2027
IUCRC Phase III University of Texas at Arlington: Center for Energy Smart Electronic Systems sponsored by National Science Foundation (NSF)
Overview: With the proliferation of automation and electronic devices throughout most major industries,the amount of data being produced and the need to manage that data continues to grow.
The powertrend for electronic systems, in general and server systems, in particular, also continues to grow at asignificant rate, making energy optimization and thermal management a challenging task. The NSFI/UCRC for Energy-Smart Electronic systems was established in 2011 to address this challenge. TheCenter’s Vision is the creation and operation of energy-optimized data centers and electronicsystems at any specified performance level by smart allocation and distribution of IT load, smartintegration of controlled on- demand cooling and smart elimination of energy waste and inefficiencies.The focus in Phase I has been to develop new energy-optimization and thermal management modelsand designs, as well as tools and algorithms enabling electronic data systems to operate more efficientlyand securely. Phase II will expand on these methodologies to progress toward our vision of dynamic, selfsensingand self-regulating systems that optimize energy consumption in data centers. The Centerbrings together computer scientists and mechanical engineers in a synergistic multidisciplinary team toadvance industrially relevant research in this area. The multi-institutional university leadership team,led by Bahgat Sammakia, Binghamton University includes: Kanad Ghose, Paul Chiarot, Timothy Miller,Binghamton University; Dereje Agonafer, University of Texas at Arlington; and Alfonso Ortega, GeraldJones, Amy Fleischer and Aaron Wemhoff, Villanova University; and Yogendra Joshi, The GeorgiaInstitute of Technology, participating as a collaborating partner. An international site – VishwakarmaInstitute of Technology (VIT), in Pune, India, and led by Siddharth Jabade, was added to the Center lastyear. The Center has received financial and/or In-Kind support from over 30 industry members over thepast five years, representing the entire supply chain from hardware manufacturers and softwaredevelopers to end users and one data center consortium – 7x24 Exchange.Intellectual Merit of the Proposed Activity: ES2 focuses on the development of systematicmethodologies for operating electronic systems, including data centers, as dynamic self-sensing andregulating cognitive systems that are predictive and verified in real time. Algorithms are being developedto control cooling resources and to assist expert system schedulers to schedule and/or migrate workload toachieve optimal energy consumption. Thermal management resources will also be allocated dynamicallyin response to system needs, resulting in a holistically controlled system. This requires a multidisciplinaryapproach integrating software algorithms, control systems, thermal management andhardware. New models being developed have direct application to a variety of electronic/computingsystems ranging all the way from the chip or device level to the system or data center level. Problemorientedresearch related to software systems, control systems, thermal management, and implementationand experimental assessment, have been addressed during the Center’s first five year program and willcontinue to be developed in close collaboration with industry.Broader Impacts of the Proposed Activity: ES2, in promoting significant reductions in energyconsumption in electronic systems, will contribute to the national agenda of pursing transformativetechnology breakthroughs that will help us meet our energy and environmental challenges. The proposedwork will have significant impact on the continuing development of experimental and testinginfrastructure at all of the participating universities. One of the emerging strengths of the ES2 Centerdeveloped within Phase I is that its participating universities have developed the most outstandingresearch quality facilities for data center related research in the world. ES2 attracts a diverse group ofstudents at the undergraduate and graduate levels, by providing industrially-relevant training required bygraduates entering the workforce. E2S is committed to attracting talented and motivated students from allgroups, and will integrate a variety of mechanisms across the partners, including enhancement of existingminority pipeline programs to exceed participation by women and underrepresented students (20%). ES2is educating broad-based scientists and engineers to create new innovations in energy efficient systems tobe transferred to industry. Students have access to research data center facilities to conduct experiments.ES2 engages industrial partners as center members on its Industrial Advisory Board and as intern hosts,and provides partners with a technology transfer mechanism for new ES2 technologies. E2S will leverageexisting programming on our campuses to engage K-12 students in conversations on energy conservation.
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Jul 2022 - Jun 2027
UTA Summer Undergraduate Research Program to Promote Diversity in Health Related Research sponsored by National Institutes of Health
The overall goal of this R25 application is to provide unique research and education opportunities to current underrepresented minority undergraduate students at the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA).
Specifically, we will expose these students to the disciplines of biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research with the ultimate goal of enriching diversity in individuals who will represent the future in biomedical research in topics areas related to the mission of the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. UTA is a minority majority institution. that ranks among the top 5 in the nation for student ethnic diversity. As of fall 2020 UTA had a total of ~48,000 full time on-campus students, the majority of which are undergraduate students (~35,000). The undergraduate student body is comprised of 31% Hispanic, 15% African American, 13% Asian, and 5% International. In 2021 the U.S News and World Report ranked UTA fifth in the nation among institutions of higher education for ethnic diversity. Furthermore, UTA is ranked #1 in the nation for “Best for Vets: Colleges” by the “Military Times”, thus is ideally suited to accomplish the objective of increasing diversity in health-related research. We will enroll two separate cohorts of underrepresented minority students: First, our selection committee will identify 10 outstanding sophomore, junior, and senior level undergraduate students from UTA (each year) to participate in a “laboratory-based” summer research education experience. Second, our selection committee will identify up to 40 underrepresented minority sophomore, junior, and senior level undergraduate students to participate in a “classroom only” summer research education experience. Each cohort will participate in a 10-week summer research / educational program, beginning the first week of June each year. Students in the “laboratory-based” cohort will be assigned a primary faculty mentor who will supervise them in conducting fulltime research related activities Monday through Thursday. On Friday’s, both cohorts come together for a joint “classroom-based” research education experience, covering a wide range of topics related to biomedical research ranging from Professional Development to the Responsible Conduct of Research. Students will also engage with URM faculty and graduate students every Friday through a series of research seminars. The primary outcomes / metrics of success will include: 1) Returning to the program for more than one summer experience (particularly for the classroom-based cohort who will be strongly encouraged to reapply the following year for the laboratory-based experience). 2) Successful completion of an undergraduate degree in a STEM field. 3) Applying for competitive fellowships for graduate school or other advanced degrees. 4) Enrollment in an advanced degree program in a STEM field. And 5) Subsequent participation in research or employment in a STEM field.
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Apr 2022 - Mar 2027
Collaborative Research: Practices and Research on Student Pathways in Education from Community College and Transfer Students in STEM (PROSPECT S-STEM) sponsored by National Science Foundation (NSF)
Collaborative Research: Practices and Research on Student Pathways in Education from Community College and Transfer Students to STEM  (PROSPECT S-STEM), an S-STEM Research Hub proposal, is organized thematically around the development of a network of S-STEM projects to empower low-income STEM students who transfer from two-year colleges (2YC) to four-year colleges (4YC).
With a collaborative PI team from universities and community colleges representing 10 current S-STEM projects, researchers in this hub are united by their goal to support domestic low-income STEM undergraduates who are navigating the transfer process from 2YC to 4YC. PROSPECT S-STEM will conduct and disseminate rigorous mixed methods research addressing the following: Student Success: PROSPECT S-STEM will actively involve S-STEM Scholars in telling their own navigational success stories through photovoice case studies, in addition to working with the involved S-STEM projects to collect common quantitative data from scholars to better understand the impacts of S-STEM programs on Scholars entering the STEM workforce.  Program Impact: Investigate the nature of the 2YCs’ and 4YCs’ S-STEM programs and other university interventions to support scholars before and after the transfer process.  Partnership Efficacy: InvestigatePROSPECT S-STEM will interview participating S-STEM PI team members, and collect local project and partnership documentation to identify the successful practices and design principles of S-STEM projects and partnership models. Faculty Learning Communities: Involve local S-STEM faculty mentors in a PROSPECT S-STEM Faculty Learning Communities. Participants will learn from each other to explore 2YC and 4YC partnerships and study recent literature on supporting low-income STEM transfer students to design additional supports for local scholars, and will test out those new ideas--adapted to different local contexts--using principles of improvement science. This community will also produce and help disseminate resources on lessons learned and best practices in mentoring and broadening participation in STEM through 2YC and 4YC partnerships.   The overarching goal of PROSPECT S-STEM is to connect research and practice to better support low-income STEM transfer students through focusing on (1) students’ lived experiences; (2) faculty and staff supports of students; (3) programmatic supports for students; and (4) two-year and four-year institutional partnerships to support transfer students. These four dimensions are interrelated, and will be studied through the lens of 10 current S-STEM projects.   
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Feb 2022 - Jan 2027
Mapping Trajectories of Alzheimer's Progression via Personalized Brain Anchor-nodes sponsored by National Institutes of Health (NIH)
Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a heterogeneous neurodegenerative disorder, not only in pathophysiology, but alsoat different disease progression stages.
Despite numerous studies that have investigated the clinical utility ofmagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) based biomarkers in characterizing AD stages from asymptomatic to mildlysymptomatic to dementia, making a personalized precision prediction and early diagnosis of AD is stillchallenging. Existing imaging biomarkers are limited in representing significant heterogeneity across differentindividuals and at different clinical stages. This challenge originates from the lack of reliable brain landmarks thatcan simultaneously characterize and represent robust population correspondences and individual variationduring normal aging and AD progression. In response, this project aims to: 1) Identify a set of brain anchornodesas population landmarks based on both group-wise consistent patterns and individualized anatomical andconnectivity properties during normal aging and AD progression among massive, publicly available neuroimagingdata sources; 2) Develop an efficient individualized shape transformation approach based on deep learning tomap population anchor-nodes to individual brains by flexibly leveraging multimodal individual features; and 3)Construct a progression tree using anchor-nodes derived brain measures to unveil and represent the widespectrum of AD development. Individual subjects can thus be projected to the tree structure to effectively andconveniently access their clinical status and predict the trend of AD progression. We will test our new frameworkson four large independent aging/AD cohorts including HCP-Aging, UK Biobank, ADNI and the latest stage ofOpen Access Series of Imaging Studies (OASIS-3), and freely release our computational tools and processeddata to the public.
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Feb 2022 - Jan 2027
CAREER: Realizing Alternative Cements with Chemical Kinetics: Tuned Mechanical–Chemical Properties of Cementitious Magnesium Silicate Hydrates by Multi-Scale Synthetic Control sponsored by National Science Foundation (NSF)
Discovering new cement chemistries with low processing energies and effective pathways to enhance cement performance will ultimately result in the easing of the energy and environmental burden of the construction industry.
Although binders based on sulfoaluminates, alkali-activated formulations, and supersulfated phases have shown promise, there remain challenges including the metastability of the phases leading to unpredictable performance in the long-term, the large amounts of caustic activators used that are energy intensive to produce, and their poor durability particularly in the presence of carbon dioxide (CO2). In addition, a major impediment to the implementation of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) substitutes is the lack of raw materials that are available in large enough quantities to support current and future cement production. Here, special focus is placed on magnesium silicate hydrates (MSH) which can be synthesized from widely abundant magnesium-rich solids and brines. Although the structure and thermodynamic properties of MSH endmembers have been studied, the cementitious nature of the phase remains obscure. Nonetheless, the intrinsically lower pH of MSH compared to calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) cements would allow applications at sub-alkaline pH (e.g., nuclear waste disposal) and CO2-rich environments, e.g., in situ geologic CO2mineralization, while the greater barrier for water exchange around Mg2+ than Ca2+ suggests that MSH is more resistant to dissolution and chemical alteration relative to CSH. In this study, we will employ dynamic high-resolution experimental methods to probe, drive, and manipulate MSH synthesis processes, structures, and properties during its nucleation to bulk growth with a focus on the phenomena that occur at the mineral–fluid interface, while emphasizing an integrated approach involving in situmanipulation and observation of disequilibrium structures and metastable states. This will be achieved by the following steps. First, experiments will be performed to derive the kinetic parameters that describe the precipitation processes in aqueous systems containing Mg, Si, and impurities. Second, focus will be placed on MSH nanocrystal and mesocrystal morphologies and the means of manipulating them. Third, we will understand how MSH structures lead to distinguishable mechanical and chemical behavior. We will apply previous learnings on the relatively well-studied CSH system to help develop approaches and interpret results in the MSH system. The central hypothesis of this work is that the rates of MSH precipitation are controlled by ligand exchange around the Mg2+ ions, and that the electric double layer structure of the growth sites controls nanocrystalline assembly into mesocrystals and the consequent mechanical–chemical property development. It is within this framework that bulk MSH growth will be understood and manipulated through its selective synthesis at the nanoscale to mesoscale to obtain phase compositions and morphologies that result in superior mechanical and durability properties. The knowledge acquired from this study can be extended to less-studied magnesium-based cements (e.g., magnesium carbonate) and to analogous systems such as CSH and inform future models of microstructural evolution. These investigations will enable the project’s ultimate goal, which is to evaluate the use of MSH as a viable binder material for construction purposes and an alternative to OPC by revealing the kinetics of its formation, and the processing–structure–property relationships in the system. The fundamental science and discovery gained from this project will expand our understanding of low-temperature mineral crystallization processes and the subsequent property development in cementitious materials across spatial and temporal scales.
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Feb 2022 - Jan 2027
US ATLAS Operations: Discovery and Measurement at the Energy Frontier sponsored by Stony Brook University
This statement of work is for the allocation of funds to the University of Texas atArlington (UTA) for the period 2/1/22-1/31/27, to support work on ATLAS Softwareand Computing (S&C).
UTA requests funding for ATLAS computing activities in five areas: SouthWest Tier 2(SWT2) operations, software development of the ATLAS Production and DistributedAnalysis System (PanDA), coordination of ATLAS distributed computing operations,software and computing R&D for the HL-LHC, and user analysis support for USphysicists.The Southwest Tier 2 Center center plays a critical role in ATLAS data processing,Monte Carlo production, and distributed user analysis. SWT2 provides pledgedresources to ATLAS to meet WLCG annual requirements, provides additional resourcesrequested by ATLAS for MC simulations, and provides computing resources for USphysicists. UTA will continue SWT2 operations and meet our obligations to the wLCG.Kaushik De is the Tier 2 manager for the Southwest Tier 2 hosted by UTA and OU. Hewill coordinate Tier 2 operations with and report to the U.S. ATLAS L3 Manager forTier 2’s, Fred Luehring at IU.The work plan for this period will include:? Purchase of replacement CPU units, storage, and other items to maintain theaugment the hardware? Operation of existing clusters to support ATLAS production and user analysis atUTA and OUSWT2 funding supports two computing professionals at UTA, Patrick McGuigan andMark Sosebee (50%), one computing professional at OU, Chris Walker, as well as Tier 2computing hardware, software and maintenance.Kaushik De is the Deputy Project Leader for US ATLAS Software and Computing(DSCPM). Kaushik De is also coordinating the PanDA Software project jointly withTorre Wenaus, and Alexei Klimentov from BNL.For PanDA software development, this allocation will support the work of FernandoBarreiro, a key PanDA core software developer, Nurcan Ozturk, a key DistributedComputing coordinator and developer, and FaHui Lin, a key PanDA core softwaredeveloper. Fernando is responsible for PanDA server, fair share, quotas and brokerage.He is stationed at CERN and currently serves as the co-coordinator of ADC TechnicalCoordination Board (TCB). Nurcan Ozturk is the ATLAS Distributed Computing DBoperations coordinator. She is also resident at CERN. FaHui Lin will be funded forPanDA pilot, Harvester, and PanDA server development. He is resident at CERN andreceives cost of living (COLA) support. The work of all three PanDA developerssupported by the NSF are critical to the success of Run 3 at the LHC and progresstowards the HL-LHC. Kaushik De supervises the work done by Fernando Barreiro,Nurcan Ozturk, and FaHui Lin, and reports to Alexei Klimentov as US ATLAS L3manager.Under facilities operations, Armen Vartapetian will be supported for the coordinationof ATLAS Distributed Computing Operations Shifts (ADCoS), US Cloud support andUS Facilities integration. Mark Sosebee (50%) will be supported for US ADC Operations
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Oct 2022 - Sep 2026
SCC-IRG Track 1: Enabling Smart Cities in Coastal Regions of Environmental and Industrial Change: Building Adaptive Capacity through Sociotechnical Networks on the Texas Gulf Coast sponsored by National Science Foundation (NSF)
This integrative research grant will build on the findings from our planning grant to assess how sociotechnical networks can be leveraged to build adaptive capacity in Coastal Bend communities facing environmental and industrial threats.
We define adaptive capacity as the ability of individuals and/or institutions to plan for, respond to, and mitigate the effects of the short and long-term impacts of environmental change and industrial growth (Hirschfeld et al. 2020; IPCC 2007). To address our overarching goal, we will (1) evaluate the structure and evolution of regional communication, information-sharing, and policy-making networks focused on environmental change and industrial expansion in the Coastal Bend, (2) develop and deploy a secure, energy-efficient, real-time, and reliable sensing network and data dashboard for environmental monitoring across the region, and (3) assess how the sensing and data communication technologies can be integrated within the regional communication and information-sharing networks to increase knowledge and awareness of environmental and industrial hazards and to build community adaptive capacity equitably among the diverse residents in the region.
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Oct 2021 - Sep 2026
Vertical Lift Research Center of Excellence sponsored by Georgia Institute of Technology
Advanced carbon fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRPs) are playing a major role in designing high-performance andlightweight vertical lift aircraft structures [1].
The DoD and Industry are facing the Future Vertical Lift aviationchallenge to replace more than 6,300 military vertical lift aircraft [2]. The industry is constantly in need of higherperformance materials that offer improved strength and stiffness at a lower weight. There has been a strong demandin using high-modulus (HM) carbon-fiber composites potentially enabling lightweight airframes and rotor componentswith significant weight savings. However, extremely low fiber-direction compressive strength has been a wellrecognizedweakness of the HM CFRPs, prohibiting their implementation in platforms. In fact, compressive strengthof intermediate-modulus (IM) CFRPs currently used in aircraft platforms almost doubles that of the HM counterparts[3]. It is also worth noting that fiber-direction compressive strength/strain to failure of the production CFRPs is onethird to one half of the fiber-direction tensile strength. Such a low compressive strain to failure imposes severelimitations on structural strength and flexibility as well as fatigue performance.Despite the strong need in higher performing materials, the lack of research efforts enabling and acceleratingfuture material solutions for vertical lift structures has been evident. The first noteworthy material developmentprogram for rotorcraft during the last decade includes the NRTC/VLC Advanced Materials Technology (AMT) Project[1]. The AMT Project, completed six years ago under the PI leadership, has been a unique collaborative effort of theUS rotorcraft OEMs and Academia, engaging commercial manufacturers of preimpregnated fiber-reinforced polymercomposites (prepreg) and offering an opportunity for the rotorcraft OEMs and the material manufacturers to worktogether toward the development of material solutions improving structural strength and fatigue performance. TheAMT Project identified promising nano-sized structural reinforcement techniques improving matrix-to-fiber interfaceproperties and increasing the matrix stiffness throughout the material – all contributing to increasing the fiber-directioncompressive strength. In particular, IM carbon/epoxy and glass/epoxy composites with 40% nanosilica weight contentin the matrix demonstrated up to 45% increase in compressive strength; 20% higher interlaminar shear strength; and25% higher endurance limit or more than a factor of 10 increase in fatigue lifetimes. However, replacing theintermediate-modulus carbon fibers with HM carbon fibers in otherwise the same composite recipe could not result indesirable property improvement [3].
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